amcg
Lv 6
amcg asked in Society & CultureLanguages · 1 year ago

Good evening, I am trying to collect the maximum of food-related English idioms. Such as ...?

* Don't over-egg the pudding.

* He gave them a dressing down.

* You don't have to bring home the bacon.

* He kept as cool as a cucumber.

* She looked like butter wouldn't melt in her mouth, but she was a tough cookie..

Would you tell me more ?

Update:

Thank you Fan Girl and Dunny. I understand the meaning.

To the next people, please, give me the meaning, I am not native speaker !

9 Answers

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  • 1 year ago
    Favourite answer

    The "dressing" in "dressing down" has nothing to do with salad dressing.

    But, there are salad days (the care free days of youth). You can milk a situation to your benefit (take advantage of a situation). That's the way the cookie crumbles (that's just how life is). He had egg on his face (he was embarrassed). One shouldn't compare apples to oranges (you can't compare things that aren't the same). She has a sugar daddy (an older man provides gifts and possibly living expenses to a young woman). Bread, dough and lettuce as terms for money. He got punched in the breadbasket (punched in the stomach).They're very much alike, like two peas in a pod. His possessions don't amount to a hill of beans (a meager amount). It was a cracker jack performance (well-done). Pork barrel legislation (laws that favor a representative's district). Corny comments (wry, funny statement). I didn't just fall off a turnip truck (I'm not naive or stupid). She is the apple of his eye (he regards her very highly).

  • 1 year ago

    The proof of the pudding is in the eating -- You can't judge something unless you try it.

  • 1 year ago

    "He's one taco short of a combination plate." ("He's not entirely in his right mind." Mildly insulting.)

    "As American as apple pie." ("Thoroughly American.")

    "Champagne taste on a beer budget." (Probably obvious: "Prefering things one can't afford."

  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    Dressing-down is not food-related. It's a nautical expression. When sails became old and sere and no longer windproof, they were dressed down: taken down and re-dressed with oil and wax, to make them hold the wind again. A sailor who was dressed down was thus treated in a way which would dramatically improve his effectiveness.

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  • 1 year ago

    - Crying over spilled milk - being upset about something that's already happened and can't be changed.

    - Cheap as chips - something that's very affordable.

    - A piece of cake - an easy task.

    - Having bigger fish to fry - more important things to do.

    - Flat as a pancake - very flat.

    - Take it with a pinch of salt - something that is exaggerated or probably untrue.

    - Bringing home the bacon - earning a living.

  • 1 year ago

    Were cooks at cruel they beat the cream and crack the eggs.

    Two many cook spoil the broth

  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    You can't have your cake and eat it too.

  • 1 year ago

    He was the main provider, the family breadwinner

  • dunny
    Lv 5
    1 year ago

    Too many cooks spoil the broth

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