I was wondering if anyone knows if a cancellation fee can be enforced for a missed first appointment if you’ve not signed an agreement?

I recently had an appointment which I had to reschedule/cancel due to work and I was told I had to pay the full fee for cancelling. I wouldn’t normally just cancel but then their attitude got my back up so I decided not to reschedule the original appointment and go elsewhere. They’re now saying I have to pay the full fee. Is this enforceable? I have no contract with them and haven’t signed anything. They also didn’t state an actual time scale on their cancellation policy just that there was one for ‘late’ cancellations. They have sent emails and sent a letter to my house and I’m unsure on where I stand on this issue legally. Would/could they try to enforce it somehow?

Thanks :)

13 Answers

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  • 5 months ago

    You DID legally agree to the terms INCLUDING the cancellation fee.

  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    What kind of service is this for a missed Doctor's appt?

  • 5 months ago

    Thank you for the responses so far. I guess it does depend on how much they want to cause an issue. I’d have thought it’d be more hassle than it was worth. As for the agreement, they did state in an email there was a cancellation fee for a late cancellation or change but never said how much that was or what the time scale was on this. I’ve never had someone try to charge me before without first having taken a deposit or having made me sign something.

  • 5 months ago

    since they didn't spell it out to you in advance, there is no court that will uphold the fee. what you're dealing with there is an overzealous clerk ... who lost your business for that firm as seems appropriate

    Source(s): grampa
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  • 5 months ago

    Many businesses have a cancellation fee if you cancel within certain time frame.

  • 5 months ago

    They can ruin your credit rating.

  • 5 months ago

    Depends on where you leave. The laws vary. But normally since you do not have a written contract and nothing in writing that states their policies, you do not have a contract with them.

  • 5 months ago

    If a contract was signed or agreed up even if it is verbal then you are obligated to pay. The verbal would need a witness though

    I hardly doubt they will make you pay , but it could go against your credit rating . It depends on how much they want you to pay

  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    No, they can't enforce it.

    They should have required a non-refundable payment in order to book the payment.

    They can, however, be little turdballs and even assign your "debt" to a collection agency. You need to know how to handle that if it happens.

    My dentist tried this BS on me once. I had to cancel because my employee called in sick. Literally ten minutes later I was able to find a sub, called my dentist back, and they said the slot had already been booked. They still expected me to pay $100 cancellation fee even though they were declining to keep the appointment. Ummm....no. You don't get to double-dip. And please send my records to my new dentist.

  • 5 months ago

    Tell them you impose a $25 fee for responding to their letters. Explain that failure to satisfy this fee will result in late charges. Start sending them invoices.

    Their obligation to pay is the same as yours.

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