In old times would humans teeth decay in sync with the average life span before medicine so there was no need to look after them?

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  • MARK
    Lv 7
    5 months ago
    Best answer

    They may not have had significant tooth decay because they ate little refined sugar. My mother is an octogenarian and sitll has all her own teeth. She firmly believes that is because during a significant part of her childhood, i.e. during the Second World War, she did not eat sweets because they were simply unavailable. I agree with her.

    • PhotonX
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      <because they ate little refined sugar> That's it exactly. The ancient Egyptians, for example, had a far harder time with their teeth than some cultures because they had to use sandstone to mill their grain, and the sand grains, being harder than tooth enamel, would wear them down over time.

  • Tom
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    Yes---there was no SUGAR in pure form, so teeth stayed healthy for a surprisingly long time

  • 5 months ago

    I expect so.

    I think tooth decay in the modern world is a product of the vast amounts of sugar consumed and the almost complete lack of fibre.

    I am not convinced that fussing about brushing and flossing really does much except perhaps partially compensate for the sugar/fibre abuse.

  • 5 months ago

    They were more prone to look after their teeth through herbal medicines . Coal is treated best to shine the teeth and tree sticks , called Miswak , is a well known norm to clean teeth in Muslim countries .So , where there is will , there is always a way

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