Can I move to Israel if my great grandmother was Jewish?

The Israeli law of return states that you must have at least one Jewish grandparent to move to Israel. My great grandmother was Jewish and gave birth to my grandpa, so he was technically Jewish too. I m just not sure if this would allow me to immigrate to Israel.

7 Answers

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  • 5 months ago

    Is your Jewglish any good?

  • 5 months ago

    yes, and as soon as you get there ask to be sent to a remote outpost where youll be able to murder Palestinians.

  • Kevin7
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    Non-Jews without any Jewish ancestry can also move to Israel via working,studying or living in Israel. If you have 1 Jewish grandparent can immigrate to Israel via Jewish law of the Return.

  • 6 months ago

    If you can show that your grandfather was Jewish by birth, then that is enough. Your great grandmother being Jewish automatically makes any children she had Jewish, in this case your grandfather.

    Israel allows aliyah if you can demonstrate at least one halachically Jewish grandparent. In this case providing evidence of your great grandmother's Jewish heritage and then proving via birth certificates that she was your biological great grandmother is enough.

    It should be noted that although Israel will allow you to immigrate, you still won't be considered halachically Jewish under stricter Orthodox Jewish rules which require you to have either converted or have a Jewish maternal line.

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  • 6 months ago

    Being Jewish is passed down from mother to mother. Guys don't count.

  • 6 months ago

    It depends, do you look jew enough? Are you circusized plenty?

  • TNO
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    Yes...though moving to Israel doesn't necessarily require a Jewish parent. It is possible to move there as a non-Jew. That's harder than Aliyah/right of return, but worth mentioning.

    From what you've provided, you may be able to make the case for moving to Israel under the right of return. A general rule is that you need one Jewish grandparent to make Aliyah, and you'd have that even if grandpa wasn't that religious. One thing that may negate your claims is if your great-grandmother converted out of Judaism before giving birth to him, or if you can't prove your grandparent or great-grandparent was Jewish. To take advantage of the right of return/Aliyah, Israel will need certain documents (e.g., marriage certificates or death records) or backing from a respected individual like a Rabbi to confirm your Jewishness.

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