Morag asked in Society & CultureLanguages · 1 year ago

Do Americans have rhyming slang like the Cockneys?

8 Answers

Relevance
  • Snid
    Lv 7
    1 year ago
    Favourite answer

    Occasionally. We're really big into tots and pears now days. Is that Cockney?

    • Morag1 year agoReport

      apples and pears (stairs)

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 1 year ago

    Rhyming slang was used somewhat in the past the criminal underworld of the West Coast between 1880 and 1920.

    It's not in general use in the United States today, but a few notable exceptions include "bread" ('bread & honey' = 'money'), "blow a raspberry ('raspberry tart' = 'fart'), "put up your dukes" ('Duke of York' = 'fork', a Cockney slang term for 'fist'), "brass tacks" ('facts')

    • RE
      Lv 7
      1 year agoReport

      Wow! Excellent. I didn't know those. Now I do, thanks to you.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    Yes, we do. For instance, we still call "giving a Bronx cheer" "blowing a raspberry," from raspberry tart [making a mouth sound like a fart], and we use the verb razz for short.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • sarah
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    No they don't, only London cockneys have rhyming slang.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • What do you think of the answers? You can sign in to give your opinion on the answer.
  • Ben
    Lv 6
    1 year ago

    Yes, because rhymes happen often even in poems and songs.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 1 year ago

    Only the very young juveniles.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    maybe like up your @ss with 5 gallons of gas...

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • Aaron
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    I don't think so.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
Still have questions? Get answers by asking now.