promotion image of download ymail app
Promoted
Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Cars & TransportationMaintenance & Repairs · 1 year ago

If I were to change a vehicle's engine, would it expand it's lifespan?

Normally vehicles last about 150,000 miles, would replacing the engine with another similar engine help expand it's lifespan, IE make it last longer than 150,000 miles?

Update:

My assumption of 150,000 miles was meant for an older vehicle, one from the 1970s. A modern car could last over 300,000 miles.

14 Answers

Relevance
  • F
    Lv 6
    1 year ago

    I had a car in the 80s and did 175 000 miles in it in 7 years. It had some minor engine work done but he body work was the problem in the end. A modern day car would still have decent bodywork after 7 years.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 1 year ago

    Until the next thing broke

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    Yes.

    NORMALLY? You get that stat from where? 150,000 miles does not say age. Average low usage is 10,000miles a year so 150K= 15 years. If you drove 20K/year then car would be 7.5 years old , or 30K/yr then car lasts 5 years, or 50K/yr then the car BODY would be 3 years old. If you drive 400 miles/day in 1 year = 146000miles on engine on a 1 year old car body. The engine is just a PART. Just like tires or windshield wipers. An expensive part, but just a part.

    Car engines greatly exceed the 150,000. Mine did 850K before I broke it.

    (or 35 yrs) Another car and engine was 30 yrs.(550Kmiles) Another 27 yrs.(470Kmiles)

    . It is not a 1 off event.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 1 year ago

    Only if the engine had some serious problem. Most cars that reach the end of their useful life still have decent engines... a bit worn but not worn out.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • What do you think of the answers? You can sign in to give your opinion on the answer.
  • 1 year ago

    The engine is only one component - you also have to take into account the transmission, rear end (if it is rear-wheel drive), wheel bearings, suspension, etc., all of which will still be old.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 1 year ago

    Assuming you wouldn't put a brand-new engine in such a car, how do you know that the used engine you use has been maintained any better than the old one? And, if you maintained your car so poorly that the engine is shot at 150,000 miles it stands to reason that the rest of the car is junk as well.

    • ...Show all comments
    • Name Withheld
      Lv 7
      1 year agoReport

      Not too many people buying Vegas and PT Cruisers these days . . . . . and the compiled reports show that (for unknown reasons) PT Cruisers lasted much longer than Neon. Wasn't the only difference other than bodywork that the PTC was made in Mexico instead of US?

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    You assumption about mileage is incorrect. Many cars do double that mileage. Especially diesels. But it's not always engine wear that kills cars. I would not go to the expense of fitting a new engine in an old vehicle only to discover the body or running gear is clapped out.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    'probably' .....................

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • Joe
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    Depends on what else is going on with the car.

    Example: My car and engine both have about 275,000 miles on them. The body is showing signs of "game over" rust in several areas. A new engine won't change that.

    No complaints: that's a good, long life for both engine and body.

    And an engineering lesson: If everything wears out at about the same time, you haven't wasted money over-engineering one component.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 1 year ago

    Most modern engines will go a lot more than 150,000 miles, but to answer your question: Yes a new engine will extend the lifespan. Assuming that the transmission is good , the suspension and steering are not wore out, and the body has not rusted excessively.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
Still have questions? Get answers by asking now.