How do we know for sure the sun is going to blow up or the universe will end in in whatever scenario ?

It could all be just pure speculation.

Update:

Additionally we dont know how exactly how the earth and it's orbit would behave with no human intervention.Perhaps nothing serious would happen if we leave everything as it is ?

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  • Matt
    Lv 7
    1 year ago
    Favorite Answer

    It is speculation, but we can observe what happens to other stars, so we have a decent idea of what will likely happen. But it's a long way away.

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  • 1 year ago

    The answer about the sun and the universe and the planet earth goes back and comes from our Creator.

    It is told that the earth will endure therefore the Sun and Moon was given to divide day and night and it's been faithfully occurring showing God is faithful in word too.

    Please Read Isaiah 45:18 and Psalms 104:5 these are just a few to reflect that earth has a purpose.

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  • Jim
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    Best guess is out sun expands out to about the orbit of Earth in another 4 billion years.

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  • 1 year ago

    We know because we understand quite accurately how stars evolve and what happens to them over time.

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  • 1 year ago

    Absence of Proof is not Proof of Absence

    That is the Philosophical answer

    I think we will be Toast

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  • 1 year ago

    How do we know the life cycle of a tree...?

    When you walk through the forest, you see pine cones, and dead, fallen trees, and saplings, and large pines standing tall... logically, we can deduce that these are different phases of trees - from birth to death.

    We do the same thing with stars... we can look out and see stars in various stages of their time on the main sequence; we see 'stellar nurseries' where stars are being formed, we see early stars surrounded by gas and dust, and (recently, at least) we see stars with planetary systems. In death, we see white dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes...

    Our sun is a dwarf star; small, when compared to others; it won't have the mass to explode at the end of it's life - it'll swell up as it begins to die in the 'red giant' phase, and slough off it's outer layers; at the end of it's life, only it's core will remain, a white dwarf about the size of Earth - which will cool slowly over billions of years.

    • Chazz1 year agoReport

      Only about 5 billion years from now

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  • Adam D
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    Set an egg out on your kitchen table, leave it for 6 months. When you crack it open, it's going to be rotten. Do that again 100 times - what happens when you crack those eggs? Rotten.

    Set out one more egg. Is it "pure speculation" to say that in 6 months, when you crack that egg, it is going to be rotten?

    The way we model how stars change over time is based on watching other stars. There are LOTS of them available to observe, at various stages of development. We don't know "for sure" what will happen in all future scenarios, but for a great many things, we can be pretty sure based on past observations of the same or similar circumstances.

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  • Sharon
    Lv 6
    1 year ago

    the Sun will not and cannot "blow up", being well below the minimum mass for a supernova.

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  • There's a limit to "for sure", but we can be reasonably confident about our current understanding about stellar life cycles -- and there's a huge difference between 'just speculation' and 'extrapolation based on observation and mathematical analysis'.

    The sun is too small to explode; that's for certain. It will just run out of hydrogen at its core, swell up into a red giant as it begins fusing helium, and when that runs out, it'll eventually shut down and become a white dwarf powered only by its trapped residual heat, surrounded by a slowly dissipating planetary nebula.

    Scenarios about the end of the universe are a great deal more uncertain, and depend on things of which we don't yet have a complete understanding. There are three likely scenarios right now: if the accelerating expansion of the universe is a runaway process, then space will simply rip itself apart. If not, then eventually the last black hole will evaporate *long* after the last star has burned out, and there will be nothing but a sea of photons at maximum entropy, and how long it takes for that to happen depends on whether protons decay or not.

    Also, we do know how the Earth's orbit would behave without human intervention as humans have *never* been able to intervene in the Earth's orbit. What we observe is driven by the gravitational relationship between the Earth/Moon system and the Sun, with extremely minor perturbations from the other planets.

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  • 1 year ago

    Obviously. I'm not trying to knock science. It has helped us really understand and know the earth and how it functions very well. Science is amazing in that way, I love nature shows. But let's be real.. The Sun has been here long before us and will be here long after us. Most of our studies of space does make me laugh because it's so limited. And there are why more theories than facts. Like the big bang theory? Like "poof! Here's a universe!" Yeah okay 👌

    Though I do think the studies are important, because we may have more facts than theories if we keep learning about the great beyond. Who knows? We may conquer space travel at some point. Until then I take most science about space with a grain of salt.

    • cosmo
      Lv 7
      1 year agoReport

      I suggest a few semesters of Astrophysics for you before you decide it's "so limited".

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