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Anonymous asked in Education & ReferenceWords & Wordplay · 1 year ago

How come Christmas is the only day of the year that we use the term "Merry" and we say "Happy" for all other holidays?

12 Answers

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  • 1 year ago

    it wouldn't sound right to use merry for other holidays

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  • Ian
    Lv 6
    1 year ago

    Merry is an interesting word which doesn't really translate into modern English. It means roughly: Jolly/drunken/celebratory/pagan/fertile/permissive. Related words include Mermaid (they are sexy as well as maritime), Morris dancing and marriage. "Merry old England" was England before the Puritans, and opposition to the Puritans rallied around their alleged attempt to ban Christmas. The puritans were opposed to all things "merry".

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  • sepia
    Lv 7
    1 year ago
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  • 1 year ago

    Merry company is the term in art history for a painting, usually from the 17th century, showing a small group of people enjoying themselves, usually seated with drinks, and often music-making. These scenes are a very common type of genre painting of the Dutch Golden Age and Flemish Baroque; it is estimated that nearly two thirds of Dutch genre scenes show people drinking.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Merry_company

    merry dancers - the aurora borealis

    https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/engli...

    https://www.bartleby.com/81/11343.html

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  • Mike
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    At the end of the poem a Visit from St. Nicholas, St. Nick says "Happy Christmas to all, and to all a good-night."

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  • 1 year ago

    The British do say Happy Christmas. "Merry" is an older reference and probably has hung on due to the popularity of Charles Dickens' "A Christmas Carol". In England, "happy" was adopted by the royal family because :merry" was associated with the lower classes.

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  • 1 year ago

    Christmas is usually recognized as the number 1 holiday and so it gets its own unique handle.

    • hi
      Lv 5
      1 year agoReport

      woww 3 liberals found your answer "politically incorrect"... the funny thing is that I guarantee you that all those 3 liberals who thumbed down your answer celebrate Christmas. God bless you.

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  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    Because it's not Merry Christmas, it's Mary Christmas, in honor of that prostitute Mary Magdalene, who was Jesus' squeeze back in the forties.

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    • Lv 7
      1 year agoReport

      Right. And, the Palestinians crucified Jebus. She was a ho for sho--does it really matter? She got immortalized in The Last Supper, the Holy Grail, her sarcophagus is hidden in the basement of the Louvre, and she was doing the dirty with Jebus--the woman's a legend. I get my facts from Dan Brown.

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  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    Merry Easter

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  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    Because of tradition and it makes it more memorable by helping it stand out from other holiday greetings.

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