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Is there a theoretical smallest physical size for a rocket that could achieve orbit?

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  • jehen
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    Yes, depending on the fuel, the engine and the payload. But I imagine at some point in the shrinking process a projectile that reaches orbit would be far more effective than a miniature rocket.

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  • Eric
    Lv 4
    1 year ago

    There is no such thing as orbit. Explain how a vacuum can exist right alongside a self-contained system.

    • Ozzie Klunk
      Lv 6
      1 year agoReport

      You must be trolling so congrats to you for snaring me. The vacuum of space does not "exist right alongside" the Earth's atmosphere. And another thing: did you ever hear of gravity?

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  • Athena
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    Yes

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  • 1 year ago

    Minimum orbital velocity is ~17,500 miles per hour. A minimal satellite such as Sputnik with a mass of ~25kg will need a kinetic energy of ½mV², so you could calculate the minimum amount of rocket fuel plus oxidizer in order to impart this kinetic energy to said satellite. I don't remember my Physics schooling enough to perform this calculation, but it is easy enough for one who is knowledgable in this area.

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  • 1 year ago

    no. Hydrogen atoms manage to disperse outside the atmosphere all the time.

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  • If there is, it would be smaller than the Pegasus launch vehicle.

    However, no small sounding rocket has ever achieved orbit.

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