So while in a store yesterday, an employee whose first language is Spanish spoke it to a Hispanic who barely speaks Spanish. (more below)?

I was the next customer in line and that employee knows I am fluent in Spanish, but since I am nit Hispanic she insists on using heavily-accented English with me. Being fluent in both languages means I can easily switch quickly and effectively between them, but found this unprofessional on her part. How do you... show more I was the next customer in line and that employee knows I am fluent in Spanish, but since I am nit Hispanic she insists on using heavily-accented English with me. Being fluent in both languages means I can easily switch quickly and effectively between them, but found this unprofessional on her part. How do you suggest I proceed in the matter?
Update: " not Hispanic " rather than " nit Hispanic " .. sorry about that typo, please focus on content.
Update 2: Most employees at that store are at least conversant in both languages. I just find it ridiculous she'd use Spanish with a Hispanic customer who barely speaks Spanish, but since I am not Hispanic it apparently doesn't matter that I'm possibly better at Spanish than she is, if that makes any sense. This... show more Most employees at that store are at least conversant in both languages. I just find it ridiculous she'd use Spanish with a Hispanic customer who barely speaks Spanish, but since I am not Hispanic it apparently doesn't matter that I'm possibly better at Spanish than she is, if that makes any sense. This happened in a town near the Mexican border so bilingualism is definitely an asset.
Update 3: No Mercy - please double check your post for spelling mistakes.
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