What's the difference between the electron field, electric field and magnetic field?

I started to write what I understood about particles and their related fields, and realised that I don't understand very well at all. Maybe the quantum electron, quark and gluon (etc) fields are a completely different in concept from electric, magnetic and gravitational fields. In that case, I'd like to... show more I started to write what I understood about particles and their related fields, and realised that I don't understand very well at all.

Maybe the quantum electron, quark and gluon (etc) fields are a completely different in concept from electric, magnetic and gravitational fields. In that case, I'd like to know whether the electron field is susceptible to any simple kind of observation (as with a magnet, paper and iron filings, or whatever).

Sorry to give such a confused question and thanks if you can help me get it clear.
Update: Thanks Oldprof, I'm a little bit clearer now. But this Wikipedia page encapsulates much of my confusion: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_field_theory . That talks about an electron and photon field (QED), and quark fields (QCD). I had pictured an electron being an exitation emitted at a particular... show more Thanks Oldprof, I'm a little bit clearer now. But this Wikipedia page encapsulates much of my confusion: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_field_theory .
That talks about an electron and photon field (QED), and quark fields (QCD).
I had pictured an electron being an exitation emitted at a particular energy level in an electron field, and used that picture to imagine a Higgs particle being an exitation emitted at a particular energy level in the Higgs field, etc.
Come to think of it, I'd also hung my picture of Pauli's Exclusion Principle being regulated by an underlying electron field.
I seems I need to study a lot more.
Update 2: Thanks very much Neb, that helped a lot. Muchas gracias.
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