The feathered dinosaurs - one question on the matter of feathers?

With birds you have beaks and, in some cases, toothed edges (with swans, geese, etc.) The beak keeps the individual feathers in shape so they stay in perfect condition for flight. The oil gland above the tail helps waterproof them too, all that I understand. However in dinosaurs who have feathers (and some had... show more With birds you have beaks and, in some cases, toothed edges (with swans, geese, etc.) The beak keeps the individual feathers in shape so they stay in perfect condition for flight. The oil gland above the tail helps waterproof them too, all that I understand.

However in dinosaurs who have feathers (and some had quite large feathers) - HOW did they keep their feather shafts in perfect condition? They were toothed jaws, which don't smooth individual feathers back to good condition no matter how you look at it. How did the dinosaurs keep their feathers 'right'? You can't do it with claws, they had no beaks, the tongue won't do it (feathers don't react like fur on a tongue).
Update: True, I know of the 'dinofuzz', but still, the ones with legit feathers had toothed jaws and not beaks. I don't think a muzzle could do enough smoothing on both sides fo the shaft (as a bird beak repairs ruffled feather damage) just by being rubbed over it. I've seen emu feathers (sort of... show more True, I know of the 'dinofuzz', but still, the ones with legit feathers had toothed jaws and not beaks. I don't think a muzzle could do enough smoothing on both sides fo the shaft (as a bird beak repairs ruffled feather damage) just by being rubbed over it. I've seen emu feathers (sort of primitive hairy things, bifurcated) and even emus do the standard bird smoothing via their beak.

A toothed jaw would put slices into the feathers, not help interlock the shaft and barbs back to full working condition.
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