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Soul Man asked in Arts & HumanitiesHistory · 7 years ago

What were some of the reasons why Hitler and Germany didn't want Communism in their nation?

Update:

Ok, then why were National Socialists opposed to Communism and didn't want that ideology within their political discourse?

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  • 7 years ago
    Favourite answer

    Hitler was strongly opposed to communism and considered it a great threat to Germany. Anyone who disagreed with Hitler politically was seen as an enemy. Communists tended to be revolutionaries which would have been a threat to Hitler as well, not being communist himself. He also considered it to be a system created by the Jews to control the people of the world. The communist ideals of a classless society wouldn't have sat well with someone who believe Aryans were above everyone else, even if communist countries never truly achieve those ideals (or try to in most cases, but that's another discussion).

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  • Anonymous
    7 years ago

    In 1924 some of Hitlers Bankers told Him to tone down the SA and his anti Semite Rhetoric or Loose funding

    Hitler was anti Jews Communism and Unions so from 1924 his rhetoric was to Blame the Communists and the Trade Unions for All of Germany's troubles That was why the Wanassee Conference was held in 1942 and Not in 1933 JP Morgan and Associates set up the Hitler Fund FDR Lindbergh Prescott Bush the Rockefeller's Warburg and Standard Oil all Financed Hitlers Bid for the Chancellors Job in 1933

    This Funding was in the Belief that Hitler would Go to war with the Bolsheviks and they Made Billions of Dollars out of the Funding and the Building of Hitlers war machine from 1933

    the Warburg chase Bank remained Open in Paris up to July 1944 to collect the Profits from the Fund

    some of the JP Morgan Associates were In Fact Semites

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  • 7 years ago

    Communism is most likely to take hold in a country that is in the midst of economic and political turmoil, and the conditions in Germany after WW1 were very favorable for it. Hitler was very pro German, and found the willingness of the Communists to take directives from Moscow abhorrent. Germany belonged to the Germans in Hitler's mind, and the Bolsheviks were people who were subhuman. The Germans were the master race destined to rule inferior types, not the other way around. Also there was a connection with the Bolsheviks to Jews, and Hitler hated Jews. Communism offered promise of equality and fairness to the Jews, who have been generally disliked

    throughout history, and discriminated against because of it. A fairly high proportion of Jews as compared to the overall population did tend to favor it, but being Jew and Bolshevik have never actually been one in the same thing. Hitler seemed to think so. The hatred and opposition of the Communists, as well as the Jews, was a part of the Nazi's propaganda campaign. It gave the German people scapegoats for their problems.

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  • 7 years ago

    The opposition is a factor, but so was the will of the people, reinforced by propaganda and within it promises/"rewards". What those were might have been an issue working with the oppression of those people, as perceived by them. Most uprisings, and differing political systems, come to power, only because of telling people that they are being oppressed in the state that they were/are in. That to me, conceived oppression and promised freedom from it, might have been more of the working cause behind the empowerment of the ideology, more than just the ideology itself. I really don't think I have a clear idea of what the people were going through before and after the rise of Hilter and how the Fascist ideology itself was perpetuated as a more beneficial system of politics and economics. I would guess that would take an few minutes of reading.

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  • ?
    Lv 6
    7 years ago

    He was ideologically opposed to that political movement.

    The communists were also blamed for the Reichstag fire, and persecuted for it. In doing so, Hitler was able to remove his political opposition and win votes with the German public.

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  • 7 years ago

    Who would want Communism in their nation? Pure communism takes everyone's property and redistributes it or makes it communal. Everyone works for free and everyone shares the the fruits of the labor. Or at least in theory that's the way it is supposed to work. It discourages hard work. This is counter to German culture and in Hitler's case it also discourages idolizing a leader, such as Der Fuhrer.

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  • 7 years ago

    Nazis were turned off by what they saw as the soulless materialism of Communism.

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  • Anonymous
    7 years ago

    because he was a national socialist

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