Centripetal force and latitude?

Wherever you stand on the Earth, you travel in (very nearly) circular motion with a period of 1 day. This requires a centripetal force directed towards the nearest point on the Earth's axis. Wherever you stand on the Earth, the force of gravity is (very nearly) in the direction of the center of the Earth. NOT... show more Wherever you stand on the Earth, you travel in (very nearly) circular motion with a period of 1 day. This requires a centripetal force directed towards the nearest point on the Earth's axis.
Wherever you stand on the Earth, the force of gravity is (very nearly) in the direction of the center of the Earth. NOT towards the nearest point on the axis unless you're on the equator.

Suppose you're at 40 degrees north latitude. Gravity is at a 40 degree angle from the direction of your acceleration. The normal force from the ground is directly opposite gravity (normal to the surface). The rotation of the ground below you and air around you creates friction towards the east, tangential to the circle.
What force adds the missing northerly component to your acceleration?
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