Does rowing to the North Pole prove man made global warming?

It appears a British group has rowed to the North Pole in what has been (self?) described as a world first. From the report from The Telegraph, I have just a few questions:

"...he and his five-man team were "exhilarated" after completing their 450-mile voyage through the Arctic waters."

OM asks: Do you see any water in their picture?

"It was later pointed out by observers that the group had in fact reached the 1996 location of the pole."

OM asks: So how far are they from the actual geographical North Pole? How far are they from the current magnetic north pole?

"It will go down in history books as the first ever (time) someone has rowed to the North Pole."

OM asks: Huh?

"... in their specially designed boat-***-sledge the Old Pulteney, which has runners on its underside so that it can be hauled over the ice."

OM asks: Huh?

So a couple of guys spent a month doing some rowing, some pulling over ice to reach the spot where the magnetic pole was in 1996 and claim it's a world first? And the Telegraph headline is: British explorers row 450 miles to North Pole in world first voyage.

Does this seem funny, pathetic, sad, ingenious, ridiculous...what's your point of view???

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/earthnews/8724098...

By the way, this should give you an idea where the magnetic pole was in 1996: http://www.greatdreams.com/solar/magnetic-north-po...

12 Answers

Relevance
  • 8 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    OMFG this is definitive proof that suckling at the teet of climate change funding goes well beyond science!

    Bravo on the intrepid reporting there Mike! Way to bring another bastard down!

  • Trevor
    Lv 7
    8 years ago

    Rowing to the North Pole doesn’t prove manmade global warming, but then I don’t think anyone is implying that it does.

    The expedition has managed to reach the 1996 location of the magnetic north pole by undertaking a journey that wouldn’t have been possible in the past. It’s the fact that the amount of Arctic sea-ice extent is presently at it’s second lowest recorded level that made it possible to row almost to the pole.

    Far more information is available on the expeditions website which includes live GPS tracking so you can see exactly where they’ve been and where they are.

    http://rowtothepole.com/

    << OM asks: Do you see any water in their picture? >>

    The Guardian article doesn’t say where the picture was taken. If it was taken at the pole then there wouldn’t have been any water as it was frozen. Of the 450 mile route the last two miles were across ice, the rest was in open water. This is what’s remarkable, only a few years ago almost all the route would have been frozen.

    << OM asks: So how far are they from the actual geographical North Pole? >>

    1269km. The 1996 magnetic north pole was at 78°35’07”N 104°11’09” and the geographic north pole is at 90°0’0”N 0°0’0”E, using the Great Circle Calculation gives the result.

    The magnetic pole is constantly moving, each day it travels about 40km and returns to roughly where it started from, the overall drift is in a northwesterly direction at a rate of about 60km per year. In 1996 an expedition equipped with magnetometers managed to pinpoint the exact position of the pole – the first time it had been done.

    Because the MNP is constantly moving it has been necessary to use an arbitrary fixed position for the purposes of sporting events, expeditions, research benchmarks etc and the 1996 fix is the one that’s used.

    << How far are they from the current magnetic north pole? >>

    Approximately 400km to the southeast but because the MNP is constantly moving it’s not possible to give a precise answer.

    << It will go down in history books as the first ever (time) someone has rowed to the North Pole >>

    They rowed 448 of the 450 miles, for all intents and purposes they rowed to the pole. So yes, it will go down in the history books. Just like the first man to swim across the pole has done (Lewis Pugh in 2007)

    And the first people to drive to the Pole (Top Gear in 2007).

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lewis_Gordon_Pugh

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Top_Gear:_Polar_Speci...

    << in their specially designed boat-сum-sledge the Old Pulteney, which has runners on its underside so that it can be hauled over the ice >>

    As explained above

    << Does this seem funny (no), pathetic (no), sad (no), ingenious (yes), ridiculous (no) >>

    << what's your point of view??? >>

    It dramatically highlights just how quickly the ice in the Arctic is retreating. Events such as swimming across the MNP or rowing to it would have been impossible even a few years ago. It’s the unprecedented melting that has enabled such events to take place.

    Right now both Arctic sea-routes are fully open and navigable by all ocean going vessels, never before has this happened.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-1467...

    Today the Arctic sea-ice extend is the second lowest it’s been at this time of year (it was less in 2007), probably not since 128,000BC was the extent as little as it is today.

    http://www.ijis.iarc.uaf.edu/seaice/extent/AMSRE_S...

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    EDIT: TO ANDY

    The Vikings wrote detailed accounts of their exploits, it’s something they are renowned for doing; as such it provides an illuminated period in history. We know where they went and what they did. It’s from these Chronicles that we get the Sagas and there is nothing that I’m aware of that suggests they navigated any part of either of the fabled Arctic passages.

    More info, links and historical detail about the Vikings, the Northwest Passage and it’s early transits in a previous answer of mine: http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=201007...

  • andy
    Lv 7
    8 years ago

    Considering that they had to haul the boat over ice to reach a theoretical point and not any of the two poles I would say this is no feat. Then again, the activists will use this as a success story. The sad thing is we don't know if any Viking long ships sailed all of the way across the Northwest passage. If we had proof of this it would dump a lot more doubt into this being the first time.

  • Ian
    Lv 5
    8 years ago

    1. They had to change their route because there was too much ice blocking their planned path. 2. They of course waited till August to be at the peak of the summer melt. 3. Their claim of being only able to row/drag their boat to the 1996 magnetic north pole because of global warming melt is bogus. 4. This in no way counts as being the first people to "row to the 1996 magnetic north pole" since they had to drag their boat across ice to reach it. If it does count, I'm going to be the first person to swim to the 1996 magnetic north pole by swimming in a pool then jumping in a chartered helicopter which drops me off at that location.

  • What do you think of the answers? You can sign in to give your opinion on the answer.
  • JimZ
    Lv 7
    8 years ago

    As you pointed out, the magnetic north pole has very little resemblance to the actual north pole. Typically they are very near but since we have apparently been beginning a reversal, it spirals away from the actual pole and in fact will probably get further. Maybe when and if it gets as far south as California, I can row a boat there as well, well if I get some fountain of youth medicine sometime in the near future that is since it would probably be hundreds of years.

    Since they seemed to want to infer that it was the actual north pole, I would call it pathetic. Does Jeff really believe they were there to study natural climate change? That I would call ridiculous.

    That they were aiming for the 1996 magnetic north, I would call funny and perplexing.

    It seems a bit like making a floating sled that you can row and naming it a row boat. Well it is exactly like that. That I would call funny as well and a bit perplexing. Yeah it might have been a first. They could have brought a golf bag and called it the first golf cart to make it there too or a surf board, etc...

  • Jeff M
    Lv 7
    8 years ago

    It's the media... People in here have consistently told you to look at the science as opposed to the media. And nowhere in that article does it state anything about 'man-made' climate change. It does state that they are investigating the effects of climate change on the region. where did 'man-made' come into it? Here is what it stated:

    "Throughout the journey, the crew, one of whom became a father a few days ago, compiled scientific research to help provide fresh environmental data on the impact of arctic deterioration on the polar landscape."

    Take off your narrow-viewed glasses please and re-read the article.

    And the 'picture' is merely a picture for the media. This entire post is obvious from someone who didn't pay the least bit of attention to it. Chances are, though, that you are getting this information from some sort of blog somewhere and didn't even read the article they were discussing but merely provided a link and restated what that blog post stated.

    JimZ: They were there to study the effects a warming environment has on the arctic. Can you not read? How in the world are they going to study the effects man-made global warming has on the arctic merely be rowing to it? Seriously some of you deniers have your head in the clouds and seem to come up with your own fantastical reason why people do things that any logical person would question what in the world you're talking about.

  • 8 years ago

    It would seem that the point of the question was to prove that you read the Telegraph.

    So do many other people, but they do not go on and on and on and on about it.

  • 8 years ago

    To avoid polluting the pristine wilderness, I wonder if they had a Porta- potty with them?

  • 8 years ago

    They rowed all but the final two miles. The had to drag the boat across most, but not all, of the final two miles.

    The posted a couple of videos for those who are interested

    http://www.rowtothepole.com/

  • Anonymous
    8 years ago

    And your point is?

Still have questions? Get answers by asking now.