Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesBooks & Authors · 9 years ago

Out of the 101 books in here, which have you read?

Tell me which ones you've read, how long or short they are, and whether you liked it or not. You can also recommend books as long as you give me the author and a description.

Author: Title

– –: Beowulf

Achebe, Chinua: Things Fall Apart

Agee, James: A Death in the Family

Austen, Jane: Pride and Prejudice

Baldwin, James: Go Tell It on the Mountain

Beckett, Samuel: Waiting for Godot

Bellow, Saul: The Adventures of Augie March

Brontë, Charlotte: Jane Eyre

Brontë, Emily: Wuthering Heights

Camus, Albert: The Stranger

Cather, Willa: Death Comes for the Archbishop

Chaucer, Geoffrey: The Canterbury Tales

Chekhov, Anton: The Cherry Orchard

Chopin, Kate: The Awakening

Conrad, Joseph: Heart of Darkness

Cooper, James Fenimore: The Last of the Mohicans

Crane, Stephen: The Red Badge of Courage

Dante: Inferno

de Cervantes, Miguel: Don Quixote

Defoe, Daniel: Robinson Crusoe

Dickens, Charles: A Tale of Two Cities

Dostoyevsky, Fyodor: Crime and Punishment

Douglass, Frederick: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

Dreiser, Theodore: An American Tragedy

Dumas, Alexandre: The Three Musketeers

Eliot, George: The Mill on the Floss

Ellison, Ralph: Invisible Man

Emerson, Ralph Waldo: Selected Essays

Faulkner, William: As I Lay Dying

Faulkner, William: The Sound and the Fury

Fielding, Henry: Tom Jones

Fitzgerald, F. Scott: The Great Gatsby

Flaubert, Gustave: Madame Bovary

Ford, Ford Madox: The Good Soldier

Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von: Faust

Golding, William: Lord of the Flies

Hardy, Thomas: Tess of the d'Urbervilles

Hawthorne, Nathaniel: The Scarlet Letter

Heller, Joseph: Catch-22

Hemingway, Ernest: A Farewell to Arms

Homer: The Iliad

Homer: The Odyssey

Hugo, Victor: The Hunchback of Notre Dame

Hurston, Zora Neale: Their Eyes Were Watching God

Huxley, Aldous: Brave New World

Ibsen, Henrik: A Doll's House

James, Henry: The Portrait of a Lady

James, Henry: The Turn of the Screw

Joyce, James: A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

Kafka, Franz: The Metamorphosis

Kingston, Maxine Hong: The Woman Warrior

Lee, Harper: To Kill a Mockingbird

Lewis, Sinclair: Babbitt

London, Jack: The Call of the Wild

Mann, Thomas: The Magic Mountain

Marquez, Gabriel García: One Hundred Years of Solitude

Melville, Herman: Bartleby the Scrivener

Melville, Herman: Moby Dick

Miller, Arthur: The Crucible

Morrison, Toni: Beloved

O'Connor, Flannery: A Good Man Is Hard to Find

O'Neill, Eugene: Long Day's Journey into Night

Orwell, George: Animal Farm

Pasternak, Boris: Doctor Zhivago

Plath, Sylvia: The Bell Jar

Poe, Edgar Allan: Selected Tales

Proust, Marcel: Swann's Way

Pynchon, Thomas: The Crying of Lot 49

Remarque, Erich Maria: All Quiet on the Western Front

Rostand, Edmond: Cyrano de Bergerac

Roth, Henry: Call It Sleep

Salinger, J.D.: The Catcher in the Rye

Shakespeare, William: Hamlet

Shakespeare, William: Macbeth

Shakespeare, William: A Midsummer Night's Dream

Shakespeare, William: Romeo and Juliet

Shaw, George Bernard: Pygmalion

Shelley, Mary: Frankenstein

Silko, Leslie Marmon: Ceremony

Solzhenitsyn, Alexander: One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich

Sophocles: Antigone

Sophocles: Oedipus Rex

Steinbeck, John: The Grapes of Wrath

Stevenson, Robert Louis: Treasure Island

Stowe, Harriet Beecher: Uncle Tom's Cabin

Swift, Jonathan: Gulliver's Travels

Thackeray, William: Vanity Fair

Thoreau, Henry David: Walden

Tolstoy, Leo: War and Peace

Turgenev, Ivan: Fathers and Sons

Twain, Mark: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Voltaire: Candide

Vonnegut, Kurt Jr.: Slaughterhouse-Five

Walker, Alice: The Color Purple

Wharton, Edith: The House of Mirth

Welty, Eudora: Collected Stories

Whitman, Walt: Leaves of Grass

Wilde, Oscar: The Picture of Dorian Gray

Williams, Tennessee: The Glass Menagerie

Woolf, Virginia: To the Lighthouse

Wright, Richard: Native Son

Update:

I guess I forgot to mention:

This list is from the College Board 101 recommended books to read for the College Bound. I've been getting more interested in reading and I wanted a list so I found this. Obviously I won't be able to read all of these ( or I may.. you never know.. ), so I wanted people's opinions to see how short or long the book is and whether it's interesting or boring.

Thanks for all the help and the recommendations. If you're wondering why some other great books aren't on here, it is because this is a list of 101 of them. There are probably many many more books that are amazing. Thank you for pointing some more for me and my friend! Wish us luck in tackling a lot of these books!

Update 2:

Of course I know that people have different likes and dislikes. That's why I'm asking for suggestions. I like seeing people's opinions. Plus I need to narrow down my choices since I can't possibly read all of them in a fast amount of time.

Update 3:

Of course I know that people have different likes and dislikes. That's why I'm asking for suggestions. I like seeing people's opinions. Plus I need to narrow down my choices since I can't possibly read all of them in a fast amount of time.

Update 4:

Of course I know that people have different likes and dislikes. That's why I'm asking for suggestions. I like seeing people's opinions. Plus I need to narrow down my choices since I can't possibly read all of them in a fast amount of time.

25 Answers

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  • Loubie
    Lv 5
    9 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    These are the ones I've read. There's too many to comment on every one, so I'll just comment on a few):

    Achebe, Chinua: Things Fall Apart

    Austen, Jane: Pride and Prejudice

    Brontë, Charlotte: Jane Eyre

    Brontë, Emily: Wuthering Heights

    Camus, Albert: The Stranger - everyone should read this. Mine is translated as 'The Outsider'

    Chaucer, Geoffrey: The Canterbury Tales (I've only read The Miller's Tale. Pretty hard to understand the Middle English it's written in. We had to translate it line by line for A level Eng. lit. - boring.)

    Defoe, Daniel: Robinson Crusoe

    Dostoyevsky, Fyodor: Crime and Punishment - amazing book

    Fitzgerald, F. Scott: The Great Gatsby - also amazing

    Golding, William: Lord of the Flies

    Heller, Joseph: Catch-22 - one of my favourite novels. Really good.

    Huxley, Aldous: Brave New World

    James, Henry: The Turn of the Screw - scary, good if you like gothic lit.

    Lee, Harper: To Kill a Mockingbird

    Marquez, Gabriel García: One Hundred Years of Solitude

    Orwell, George: Animal Farm

    Plath, Sylvia: The Bell Jar

    Salinger, J.D.: The Catcher in the Rye

    Shakespeare, William: Hamlet - I like Shakespeare, but I understand he's not to everyone's taste.

    Shakespeare, William: Macbeth

    Shakespeare, William: A Midsummer Night's Dream

    Shakespeare, William: Romeo and Juliet

    Shaw, George Bernard: Pygmalion - hilarious.

    Shelley, Mary: Frankenstein

    Swift, Jonathan: Gulliver's Travels

    Tolstoy, Leo: War and Peace - AMAZING novel, can't recommend this enough.

    Voltaire: Candide

    Vonnegut, Kurt Jr.: Slaughterhouse-Five - really good, you'll like this if you like Catch-22.

    Walker, Alice: The Color Purple

    Wilde, Oscar: The Picture of Dorian Gray

    I've read quite a few of them, but only because I studied English Literature for my degree. Thinking about it, I should have really read more of these. I'll get around to it one day...

    My favourite of the list is probably War and Peace or Crime and Punishment, but I think Anna Karenina by Tolstoy should be on this list. My copy of War and Peace (translated by Larissa Volokhonsky) is 1224 pages long. It's a fantastic book, and you shouldn't be put off by its length or writing style.

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  • 9 years ago

    I've read:

    Wright, Richard: Native Son

    Williams, Tennessee: The Glass Menagerie

    Vonnegut, Kurt Jr.: Slaughterhouse-Five

    Salinger, J.D.: The Catcher in the Rye

    Shakespeare, William: Hamlet

    Orwell, George: Animal Farm

    Shakespeare, William: Macbeth

    Shakespeare, William: A Midsummer Night's Dream

    Hurston, Zora Neale: Their Eyes Were Watching God

    Homer: The Odyssey

    Golding, William: Lord of the Flies

    Fitzgerald, F. Scott: The Great Gatsb

    Hawthorne, Nathaniel: The Scarlet Letter

    Faulkner, William: The Sound and the Fury

    Huxley, Aldous: Brave New World

    Dostoyevsky, Fyodor: Crime and Punishment

    Conrad, Joseph: Heart of Darkness

    Remarque, Erich Maria: All Quiet on the Western Front

    Lee, Harper: To Kill a Mockingbird

    Kafka, Franz: The Metamorphosis

    Miller, Arthur: The Crucible

    Source(s): AP Language & Composition AP Literature & Composition
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  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    – –: Beowulf

    Achebe, Chinua: Things Fall Apart

    – –: Beowulf

    Austen, Jane: Pride and Prejudice

    Camus, Albert: The Stranger

    Chaucer, Geoffrey: The Canterbury Tales

    Chopin, Kate: The Awakening

    Crane, Stephen: The Red Badge of Courage

    Dante: Inferno

    Ellison, Ralph: Invisible Man

    Faulkner, William: As I Lay Dying

    Fitzgerald, F. Scott: The Great Gatsby

    Golding, William: Lord of the Flies

    Hawthorne, Nathaniel: The Scarlet Letter

    Heller, Joseph: Catch-22

    Hemingway, Ernest: A Farewell to Arms

    Homer: The Iliad

    Homer: The Odyssey

    Huxley, Aldous: Brave New World

    Ibsen, Henrik: A Doll's House

    Joyce, James: A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

    Kafka, Franz: The Metamorphosis

    London, Jack: The Call of the Wild

    Melville, Herman: Moby Dick

    Morrison, Toni: Beloved

    Orwell, George: Animal Farm

    Pasternak, Boris: Doctor Zhivago

    Plath, Sylvia: The Bell Jar

    Poe, Edgar Allan: Selected Tales

    Proust, Marcel: Swann's Way

    Roth, Henry: Call It Sleep

    Shakespeare, William: Hamlet

    Shakespeare, William: Macbeth

    Shakespeare, William: Romeo and Juliet

    Sophocles: Antigone

    Sophocles: Oedipus Rex

    Stevenson, Robert Louis: Treasure Island

    Swift, Jonathan: Gulliver's Travels

    Vonnegut, Kurt Jr.: Slaughterhouse-Five

    Walker, Alice: The Color Purple

    Wharton, Edith: The House of Mirth

    Williams, Tennessee: The Glass Menagerie

    Woolf, Virginia: To the Lighthouse

    Wright, Richard: Native Son

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  • I have read...

    Austen, Jane: Pride and Prejudice

    Fitzgerald, F. Scott: The Great Gatsby

    Homer: The Odyssey

    Kafka, Franz: The Metamorphosis

    Lee, Harper: To Kill a Mockingbird

    London, Jack: The Call of the Wild

    Salinger, J.D.: The Catcher in the Rye

    Shelley, Mary: Frankenstein

    Sophocles: Antigone

    Twain, Mark: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

    I've read only ten books from the list? That's darn sad.

    Source(s):
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  • Kailey
    Lv 6
    9 years ago

    I've read 13 of 101. Wow...I feel like such a failure :P

    Beowulf, The Canterbury Tales, The Awakening, Brave New World, To Kill a Mockingbird, The Crucible, Animal Farm, Hamlet, Macbeth, Romeo and Juliet, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Candide, and The Picture of Dorian Gray.

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  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

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  • 9 years ago

    Let me start with saying what is a good book for somebody, doesn't mean it would be a good book for yourself. It depends on peoples taste in books, and for what kind of read they are looking for.

    I've read 4 and am in the middle of my 5th. The books from this list that I have read are:

    Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare (I thought this book was really good, well one because it was a tragedy romance, and to me those are amazing, but it was also Historical Fiction which is also one of my many favorite genres.),

    The Crucible by Arthur Miller (Amazing to me, but not so much for a person who doesn't believe in witchcraft, or like the Salem Witch Trials, as this book contains both of these. Also mentions the devil alot.),

    To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee (Another great book to me, the characters were thought of brilliantly, the only flaw I thought it had, was the characters ages. The whole book felt to me that it would have been more truthful had Scout and Jem been a little bit older than 6 and 9, I think),

    and

    The Odyssey by Homer (Personally, I HATED this book. It was so dragged out, though Homer did put great detail in it, and you almost felt as if you were the main character, who's name I can't spell.).

    At the beginning of the 2010-2011 school year I started reading Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte, unfortunately I still can't seem to get through it. So in my opinion it is one of the most boring books I've ever read.

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  • ?
    Lv 4
    9 years ago

    I've read The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. It's about three hundred pages, and it's spelled phonetically (so words like stayed look like staid). It's really good and interesting... funny, too!

    I would recommend any books by Anne Rinaldi. She is an amazing Historical Fiction author that shows life in every point of history. If you're looking for a specific book, A Break With Charity (by Anne Rinaldi) is amazing! It's about the Salem Witchcraft Trials. Also The Girl in Blue (Also by Rinaldi) is an excellent book about a girl in the Civil War.

    Hope I could help!

    Source(s): Personal Experience! (The best source around)
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  • 9 years ago

    Brontë, Charlotte: Jane Eyre (not too bad, nice story)

    Brontë, Emily: Wuthering Heights (short, nice story)

    Hawthorne, Nathaniel: The Scarlet Letter (short, I hated it, very depressing)

    Homer: The Odyssey (short, I loved it) :)

    London, Jack: The Call of the Wild (not too bad, I loved it)

    Melville, Herman: Moby Dick (not too bad, nice story)

    Miller, Arthur: The Crucible (short, meh)

    Shakespeare, William: Hamlet (not too bad, loved it)

    Shakespeare, William: Macbeth (not too bad, loved it)

    Shakespeare, William: A Midsummer Night's Dream (short, loved it)

    Shakespeare, William: Romeo and Juliet (not too bad, loved it)

    Shaw, George Bernard: Pygmalion (short, meh)

    Shelley, Mary: Frankenstein (short/not too bad, everyone should read this at least once)

    Sophocles: Antigone (short, nice story)

    Sophocles: Oedipus Rex (short, nice story)

    Stowe, Harriet Beecher: Uncle Tom's Cabin (not too bad, meh but everyone should read it)

    Swift, Jonathan: Gulliver's Travels (not too bad, nice story)

    Twain, Mark: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (not too bad, loved it)

    also partly read (and someday I WILL finish them lol):

    Austen, Jane: Pride and Prejudice

    Chaucer, Geoffrey: The Canterbury Tales

    Cooper, James Fenimore: The Last of the Mohicans

    Fitzgerald, F. Scott: The Great Gatsby

    Hope this helps :)

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  • 9 years ago

    I'm sensing a lot of scrolling up and down to answer this one. We'll see how it goes.

    Austin, Jane: Pride and Prejudice (I'm not female and read this book. Not sure if it's still relevant to the times, but if you can get into the setting, like I was able to, you can still become invested in the characters)

    Bronte, Charlotte: Wuthering Heights (Thousand times yes)

    Defoe, Daniel: Robinson Crusoe (Read it a long time ago. Can't recall much about it)

    Dickens, Charles: A Tale of Two Cities (Amazing on many levels. Read into it, it's one of the few books that I actually enjoyed close reading)

    Dostoyevsky, Fyodor: Crime and Punishment (I'm just glad The Brothers Karamazov weren't on here. I really enjoyed Crime and Punishment, but couldn't stand Karamazov. Life's funny that way)

    Ellison, Ralph: Invisible Man (Very interesting book. Not your typical racial empowerment either.)

    Fitzgerald, F. Scott: The Great Gatsby (Most people are required to read this, for a reason)

    Golding, William: Lord of the Flies (Wow. Children are messed up. Great book though)

    Hurston, Zora Neale: Their Eyes Were Watching God (Chock full of feminism and dialect. Still a worthwhile read)

    Kingston, Maxine Hong: The Woman Warrior (actually just finished last night, and wasn't much to my tastes. It doesn't have a cohesive plot, so consider it a collection of short stories)

    Lee, Harper: To Kill a Mockingbird (Amazing no matter how many times I read it)

    London, Jack: The Call of the Wild (Pretty simple book. I read this when I was in middle school I think.)

    Melville, Herman: Moby Dick (Horrible. I read it on my own, and it was incredibly boring. And I can handle my fair share of prose, too)

    Miller, Arthur: The Crucible (Can't say I enjoyed it much)

    Salinger, J.D.: The Catcher in the Rye (Overrated, but not in a bad way)

    Shakespeare: Hamlet (Fantastic)

    Shakespeare: Romeo and Juliet (Overdone, I would have replaced this with King Lear. It's only on here because the story is popular)

    Shakespeare: A Midsummer Night's Dream (Fantastical story, does it well)

    Shakespeare: Macbeth (FEAR MACDUFF! No, but it's a good play.)

    (As to why King Lear isn't included in that Shakespeare list I do not know. It should be though)

    Steinbeck, John: The Grapes of Wrath (Really great story about a pivotal time in American History)

    Stevenson, Robert Louis: Treasure Island (Another simplistic read, but it's timeless)

    Swift, Jonathan: Gulliver's Travels (Took me a few tries to read all the way through this, usually having to try again after a couple of years. It was well worth the wait though. Withering commentary on society, I only wish I knew more of the context)

    Thoreau, Henry David: Walden (Admittedly, I've only read MOST of this one, and it's pretty typical Thoreau, all the way through. Interpret that as you will)

    Tolstoy, Leo: War and Peace (I chose to read this bad boy for class, and actually enjoyed the paper I wrote on it. Really excellent book)

    Twain, Mark: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Probably a bit boring for many readers, but it's worth it to power through and read)

    Williams, Tennessee: The Glass Menagerie (Meh)

    And that's it. It was interesting to see for myself how many of those were due to required reading for a class compared to what I read on my own.

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