Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureHolidaysYom Kippur · 10 years ago

What's the difference between Kosher coffee and normal coffee?

I bought coffee and realised it said kosher, still bought it though. I'm not Jewish, but what is the difference? :))

Thanks

Update:

@slyven: Yeah I thought that too, coffee is kosher. Maybe incase it's been stored next to meat or the possibility of it being contaminated I'm not sure. It's an odd one :P

9 Answers

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  • 10 years ago
    Favourite answer

    The 'beans' which is in fact a seed of the drupe fruit of the Coffea shrub or tree, are kosher. However, during the production the bean is often roasted and then flavour enhanced, this enhancement of flavour must adhere to Kashrut, the Jewish dietary laws. There is also problems in whether the chemicals used in decaffeinated caffeine adhere to dietary laws. There is also the packaging which cannot be made from anything that can come in contact with the food which is considered non-Kosher. Non-Kosher sources in packaging renders the items inside unacceptable. Also, some food items in Jewish dietary law have to be handled by a Jew or supervised by a Rabbi. Then there is the problem of marris ayin in some cases, an action that is permitted under Jewish law, but gives the impression of wrongdoing, for instance purchasing the coffee through a outlet that is known for being largely traif (non-Kosher).

    And this is before we move onto Kosher milk.

  • 4 years ago

    Kosher Coffee

  • 10 years ago

    it means that what was used was kosher, that the equipment used was kosher and that there was a rabbi watching over the production of it.

    btw kosher is way more complicated when whether it is meat that is from a kosher animal and killed the right way. you can't mix meat and milk. a rabbi has to watch over it or confirm that it is kosher (thats what it means when it says kosher- that a rabbi approved of it) kosher equipment - if it was used for milk cant be used for meat ... there are many kinds are animals that aren't also birds and fish. - a lot of candy (especially gummies) are made with gelatin which usually is not kosher. also it doesnt matter where it was stored - unless it was open.

    most coffee is kosher - coffee from Starbucks and dunkin donuts is kosher (usually)

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    What's the difference between Kosher coffee and normal coffee?

    I bought coffee and realised it said kosher, still bought it though. I'm not Jewish, but what is the difference? :))

    Thanks

    Source(s): 39 difference kosher coffee normal coffee: https://tr.im/i8NS5
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  • Anonymous
    10 years ago

    It really has nothing to do with the coffee itself. It has to do with the equipment that the coffee is prepared in...it assures the people to whom it matters that no pork, milk, or other meat, shellfish, etc., have come in contact with the beans or the machinery that is used to produce it.

    See, if any of those things come in contact with the coffee or machinery, it becomes contaminated.

    Granted, it's a pretty remote possibility, but the people who keep strict kosher really care about such things.

  • Melkha
    Lv 7
    10 years ago

    Although coffee beans themselves are kosher it is the process and all that the beans contact that must adhere to strict kosher standards.

    Kosher refers to both the food item and the processing.

    Kosher means - fit for consumption.

    Kosher can also refer to non food items as well - such as a Kosher Torah, mezzuzah, etc.

  • Anonymous
    10 years ago

    The plants where it is processed.

    It has nothing to do with the coffee itself, but with what it can come in contact with that isn't kosher.

  • Anonymous
    10 years ago

    Thats weird it must just be telling you its Kosher even though its impossible for it not to be as its not meat :L

  • 10 years ago

    35 cents

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