WEre the ten commandments plagarized?

Below you will find references to the dating of the ten commandments--and dating of the code of Ur-Nammu. Many Christians tell us our morality derived from the ten commandments--by inference that before then we must have been immoral. Clearly the dating of these two documents shows that the biblical ten... show more Below you will find references to the dating of the ten commandments--and dating of the code of Ur-Nammu. Many Christians tell us our morality derived from the ten commandments--by inference that before then we must have been immoral. Clearly the dating of these two documents shows that the biblical ten commandments against robbery, murder, rape, and adultry were predated by over 600 years by earlier human codes. Note that the UR code came in the 21st century BC, while ten commandments came 13th century BC. Abraham came from UR, and would have been exposed to these laws and transmitting them to the hebrews. Doesn't this clearly indicate the hebrew authors simply plagarized existing human laws into their own religious dogma via a man exposed to them--abraham?

Biblical Ten Commandments

1 Kings 6:1 (King James Version)
1And it came to pass in the four hundred and eightieth year after the children of Israel were come out of the land of Egypt, in the fourth year of Solomon's reign over Israel, in the month Zif, which is the second month, that he began to build the house of the LORD.



The date can be calculated based on a 961BC date for Solomons Temple, we then add the 480 years which arrives at 1441 BC for the Exodus. The 10 Commandments would have been received some time after that - probably in 1440 or later in 1441, depending on which month the Exodus began in. The verse below indicates it took 3 months to travel from Egypt to Sinai where the commandments were given to Moses.

CODE OF UR-NAMMU
The Code of Ur-Nammu is the oldest known tablet containing a law code surviving today. It was written in the Sumerian language circa 2100 BC-2050 BC . Although the preface directly credits the laws to king Ur-Nammu of Ur (2112-2095 BC), some historians think they should rather be ascribed to his son Shulgi.

The first copy of the code, in two fragments found at Nippur, was translated by Samuel Kramer in 1952; owing to its partial preservation, only the prologue and 5 of the laws were discernible[1]. Further tablets were found in Ur and translated in 1965, allowing some 40 of the 57 laws to be reconstructed.[2] Another copy found in Sippar contains slight variants.

Although it is known that earlier law-codes existed, such as the Code of Urukagina, this represents the earliest legal text that is extant. It predated the Code of Hammurabi by some three centuries.

The laws are arranged in casuistic form of if-(crime), then-(punishment) — a pattern to be followed in nearly all subsequent codes. For the oldest extant law-code known to history, it is considered remarkably advanced, because it institutes fines of monetary compensation for bodily damage, as opposed to the later lex talionis (‘eye for an eye’) principle of Babylonian law; however, murder, robbery, adultery and rape were capital offenses.
Update: If you took out the commandments that were common as one religous poster noted to previous cultures--what you'd be left with is the "one commandment" alll the rest are to be found in writings from earlierr cultures. I will admit keeping the sabbath special is a unique hebrew affectation.
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