Do you think the Sex Offender Registry is like The Scarlet Letter?

I asked this question several months ago, but didn't receive very many answers, and then some cvnt insulted me and voted herself Best Answer, so I'm asking it again. The Scarlet Letter is about a woman who becomes pregnant while estranged from her husband in a 17th century Puritan community. Naturally,... show more I asked this question several months ago, but didn't receive very many answers, and then some cvnt insulted me and voted herself Best Answer, so I'm asking it again.

The Scarlet Letter is about a woman who becomes pregnant while estranged from her husband in a 17th century Puritan community. Naturally, her community believes she must have committed adultery, and brands her with The Scarlet Letter, a letter branded onto criminals' skin so that everyone forever identifies them as a criminal. But the woman lives such a virtuous life and helps so many people, that eventually The Scarlet Letter comes to be known as a symbol of goodness and compassion, rather than something negative.

This seems eerily similar to our own society's Sex Offender Registry, which forever brands people as sex offenders, even for such small crimes as a 16 year old girl sending out her naked pictures to her friends or something like that. Once a person is marked like this, it can ruin them for life. Employers can see them on that list and think they're rapists, anyone they know can find them on that, and so on. It can ruin a person's life.

So do you think The Sex Offender Registry is just our society's modern form of branding?

Inspired by this question:
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?...
Update: You have to put yourself in the mind of a 17th century Puritan, Nate. Crimes that seem small to us were egregious to them, that's the whole point. All crimes are subjective and judged by the society viewing them. The Scarlet Letter speaks of a deeper truth than one that can be found by just judging another... show more You have to put yourself in the mind of a 17th century Puritan, Nate. Crimes that seem small to us were egregious to them, that's the whole point. All crimes are subjective and judged by the society viewing them. The Scarlet Letter speaks of a deeper truth than one that can be found by just judging another society from your present point of view.
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