Jehovah Witnesses, is the Father called the 'Beginning,' and the End?

Does the 'Beginning' mean He had a beginning? Does it mean He was created? I'm trying to follow your logic here. You said, because Jesus is said to be the Beginning in Revelation 3:14, and in also called the Beginning and the End in Revelation 1 and 22, He thus had a beginning. Same Greek words are used... show more Does the 'Beginning' mean He had a beginning? Does it mean He was created? I'm trying to follow your logic here. You said, because Jesus is said to be the Beginning in Revelation 3:14, and in also called the Beginning and the End in Revelation 1 and 22, He thus had a beginning. Same Greek words are used when 'Beginning and End' is describing the Father. Why in one instance does it mean Jesus was created, but not the Father? Neither the Father, nor the Son are created.
Update: Hannah, Regarding Colossians 1:15... According to Thayer's Greek Lexicon, the word 'firstborn' (Greek: prototokos) is an adjective. While in a literal sense, it can denote the first that comes from the womb, but frequently is an expression of supremacy, not chronological order. Psalms 89:27,... show more Hannah,

Regarding Colossians 1:15...

According to Thayer's Greek Lexicon, the word 'firstborn' (Greek: prototokos) is an adjective. While in a literal sense, it can denote the first that comes from the womb, but frequently is an expression of supremacy, not chronological order.

Psalms 89:27, God said in regards to David, that He would appoint David to be His 'firstborn, the highest of the kings of the earth.' Also in Jeremiah 31:9, where Ephraim is called the Lord's 'firstborn,' although, Manasseh was Ephraim's older brother, the 'firstborn' from the womb (Genesis 48:14). In this context, and as shown in Genesis 48:19, as well as Psalms 89:27, the term 'firstborn' is a title of superiority, of supremacy. The term 'firstborn' in Colossians 1:15 does not refer to an actual physical birth, but rather, refers to Christ's position of supremacy.
Update 2: Hannah, And as for Revelation 3:14... ‘Beginning’ here, translates from the Greek word ‘arche,’ meaning ‘the origin,’ ‘the active cause,’ ‘that by which anything begins to be,’ ‘leader,’ ‘the person or thing that commences,’ ‘magistracy,’ ‘rule.’ Revelation 3:14 does not in anyway teach that Christ was... show more Hannah,

And as for Revelation 3:14...

‘Beginning’ here, translates from the Greek word ‘arche,’ meaning ‘the origin,’ ‘the active cause,’ ‘that by which anything begins to be,’ ‘leader,’ ‘the person or thing that commences,’ ‘magistracy,’ ‘rule.’ Revelation 3:14 does not in anyway teach that Christ was created. Ironically, it teaches that He is the ‘active cause,’ ‘the origin’ of all creation, that He is the Creator, the source of all things, the Beginning of all things.
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