? asked in Arts & HumanitiesGenealogy · 1 decade ago

What does the name Harry mean?

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  • Tina
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago
    Favourite answer

    Harry Name Meaning and History

    English (mainly South Wales and southwestern England): from the medieval personal name Harry, which was the usual vernacular form of Henry, with assimilation of the consonantal cluster and regular Middle English change of -er- to -ar-.

    French: from the Germanic personal name Hariric, composed of the elements hari, heri ‘army’ + ric ‘power(ful)’.

    Dictionary of American Family Names, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-50813

    http://www.ancestry.com/facts/Harry-family-history...

    Henry as a Given Name

    English: a perennially enduring given name, of Continental Germanic origin, composed of the elements haim home + ric power, ruler. It was introduced to Britain by the Normans, and has been borne by eight kings of England. In its various European cognate forms and in the Latin form Henricus, it has been borne by kings and princes in many countries of Europe. Henry the Fowler (c.876–936), Duke of Saxony, was elected King of the Germans and became the first of a long succession of bearers of the name to rule in central Europe. It was also borne by six kings of France and four kings of Castile and Leon. In England it was not until the 17th century that the form Henry (rather than Harry) became the standard vernacular form, mainly as a result of the influence of Latin Henricus and French Henri. Cognates: Irish Gaelic: Anraí, Éinrí. Scottish Gaelic: Eanraig. French: Henri. Italian: Enrico. Spanish: Enrique. Catalan: Enric. Portuguese: Henrique. Romanian: Henric. German: Heinrich. Low German: Henrik, Hinrich. Dutch: Hendrik. Scandinavian: Hen(d)rik. Polish: Henryk. Czech: Jindrich. Finnish: Heikki. Hungarian: Henrik; See also Imre.

    Pet forms: English: Hal, Hank, Harry. Spanish: Quique. German: Heino, Heinz. Low German: Heiko, Henning. Danish: Henning.

    A Dictionary of First Names, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0192800507

    http://www.ancestry.com/facts/harry-family-history...

    Henry Name Meaning and History

    English and French: from a Germanic personal name composed of the elements haim, heim ‘home’ + ric ‘power’, ‘ruler’, introduced to England by the Normans in the form Henri. During the Middle Ages this name became enormously popular in England and was borne by eight kings. Continental forms of the personal name were equally popular throughout Europe (German Heinrich, French Henri, Italian Enrico and Arrigo, Czech Jindrich, etc.). As an American family name, the English form Henry has absorbed patronymics and many other derivatives of this ancient name in continental European languages. (For forms, see Hanks and Hodges 1988.) In the period in which the majority of English surnames were formed, a common English vernacular form of the name was Harry, hence the surnames Harris (southern) and Harrison (northern). Official documents of the period normally used the Latinized form Henricus. In medieval times, English Henry absorbed an originally distinct Old English personal name that had hagan ‘hawthorn’. Compare Hain 2 as its first element, and there has also been confusion with Amery.

    Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó hInnéirghe ‘descendant of Innéirghe’, a byname based on éirghe ‘arising’.

    Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Éinrí or Mac Einri, patronymics from the personal names Éinrí, Einri, Irish forms of Henry. It is also found as a variant of McEnery.

    Jewish (American): Americanized form of various like-sounding Ashkenazic Jewish names.

    Dictionary of American Family Names, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-508137-4

    http://www.ancestry.com/facts/Henry-family-history...

    Last name: Harry

    This interesting surname is first recorded in England, but also has later Scottish associations. It derives from the personal name Harry, itself a nickname or dialectal transposition from the old French name "Henri". This name translating as "home-rule", first appears in England in its Latinized form "Henricus" in the Domesday Book of 1086, being introduced at the Norman Invasion of 1066. During the Middle Ages the name, as Henry, became enormously popular in England and was borne by no less than eight kings, a record not equalled until the 20th Century, when Edward V111 had his short reign in 1936. The surname both as Henry and Harry, is first recorded in the latter half of the 13th Century. Early examples of the recordings taken from authentic charters and registers of the period include William Herry, a witness in the court rolls of the borough of Colchester in 1337, and William Harrys of Eynsham, Oxfordshire, in the year 1406. Over the centuries the surname has been variously recorded as Harry, Harrie, Harrhy, Harris, Harries, and Harriss, all but the first being patronymics. Amongst the many interesting name bearers are "Blind" Harry, a court musician (1470 - 1492), Walter Harris, (1647 - 1732), the court physician to King Charles 11, and George Harris, the first baron Harris, general commanding the British 5th Fusiliers at the battle of Bunker Hill, in 1775. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Nicholas Herri, which was dated 1327, in the "Subsidy Rolls of the county of Buckinghamshire", during the reign of King Edward 1st of England, known as "The Hammer of the Scots", 1272 - 1307.

    © Copyright: Name Origin Research www.surnamedb.com 1980 - 2010

    Read more: http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Harry#ixzz0pspeXb...

    Harry Surname

    The surname of HARRY was of Welsh origin, descendant of Harry, a pet form of Henry. This surname was the Middle English version of Henry, rarer than its derivatives Harris. Early records of the name mention William Harrys of the County of Oxfordshire in 1406. Lawrence Harryes of the County of Hertfordshire in 1468. The rise of surnames, according to the accepted theory, was due to the Norman Conquest of 1066 when Old English personal-names were rapidly superseded by the new christian names introduced by the Normans. Of these, only a few were really popular and in the 12th century this scarcity of christian names led to the increasing use of surnames to distinguish the numerous individuals of the same name. Some Normans had hereditary surnames before they came to England, but there is evidence that surnames would have developed in England even had there been no Norman Conquest. The development of the feudal system made it essential that the king should know exactly what service each person owed. Payments to and by the exchequer required that debtors and creditors should be particularized, and it became official that each individual acquired exact identification. Both Harris and Harrison are extremely common English surnames; the former tends to be more common in the West Midlands and South West England, whereas the latter is commonest in the North of England. A large and influential American family are descended from Benjamin Harrison, who emigrated from England to Virginia in 1633 or 1634. Ancestors include another Benjamin Harrison (1726-91) who was an activist in the American Revolution and a signatory of the Declaration of Independance. His son William Henry Harrison (1773-1841) and great grandson Benjamin Harrison (1833-1901) both became president of the United States. http://www.4crests.com/harry-coat-of-arms.html

    Henry Surname

    The surname of HENRY was a baptismal name 'the son of Harry'. Early records of the name mention Henricus listed in the Domesday Book of 1086. Willelmus Henrysone was listed in the Yorkshire Poll Tax of 1379. When the sparse Irish population began to increase it became necessary to broaden the base of personal identification by moving from single names to a more definite nomenclature. The prefix MAC was given to the father's christian name, or O to that of a grandfather or even earlier ancestor. The name was originally from a Germanic personal name composed of the elements HEIM (home) and RIC (power) meaning 'home-rule). The name was introduced into England by the Normans in the form HENRI. During the Middle Ages this name became enormously popular in England and was borne by eight kings. Continental forms of the name were equally popular, in Germany as Heinrich, France, Henri etc. In the period in which the majority of surnames were formed in England, a common vernacular form of the name was HARRY; official documents of the period normally used the Latin form HENRICUS. On the whole the richer and more powerful classes tended to acquire surnames earlier than the working class or the poor, while surnames were quicker to catch on in urban areas than in more sparsely populated rural areas. The bulk of surnames in England were formed in the 13th and 14th centuries. The process started earlier and continued in place names into the 19th century, but the norm is that in the 11th century people did not have surnames, whereas by the 15th century they did. Early records of the name mention Henricus (without surname) who was listed in the Domesday Book of 1086. Thomas Henery was recorded in 1275 in County Kent, and Adam Henris appears in 1333 in County Sussex. Willelmus Henrysone was listed in the Yorkshire Poll Tax of 1379. Joanne Henery was documented in County Gloucestershire in the year 1621, and Henry Jepson and Jennett Smith were married at St. George's, Hanover Square, London in the year 1656. The name has been given to eight Kings of England and to four Kings of France. http://www.4crests.com/henry-coat-of-arms.html

    The Harry surname has roots in Latin and translated as "home-rule", first appears in England in its Latinized form "Henricus" in the Domesday Book of 1086, being introduced at the Norman Invasion of 1066. Also, French: from the Germanic personal name Hariric, composed of the elements hari, heri ‘army’ + ric ‘power(ful)’ and English and French: from a Germanic personal name composed of the elements haim, heim

    Source(s): Sources in text of answer.
  • 1 decade ago

    Harry

    English: pet form of Henry, sometimes used as an independent name. This was the usual English form of Henry in the Middle Ages and later, and was the form used by Shakespeare as the familiar name of the mature King Henry V (compare Hal). The intermediate form Herry probably arose from the French pronunciation with a nasalized vowel, or it may be the result of straightforward assimilation; the change of -er- to -ar- was a regular feature of late Middle English. Pet form: Hal.

    A Dictionary of First Names, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0192800507

    Henry

    English: a perennially enduring given name, of Continental Germanic origin, composed of the elements haim home + ric power, ruler. It was introduced to Britain by the Normans, and has been borne by eight kings of England. In its various European cognate forms and in the Latin form Henricus, it has been borne by kings and princes in many countries of Europe. Henry the Fowler (c.876–936), Duke of Saxony, was elected King of the Germans and became the first of a long succession of bearers of the name to rule in central Europe. It was also borne by six kings of France and four kings of Castile and Leon. In England it was not until the 17th century that the form Henry (rather than Harry) became the standard vernacular form, mainly as a result of the influence of Latin Henricus and French Henri. Cognates: Irish Gaelic: Anraí, Éinrí. Scottish Gaelic: Eanraig. French: Henri. Italian: Enrico. Spanish: Enrique. Catalan: Enric. Portuguese: Henrique. Romanian: Henric. German: Heinrich. Low German: Henrik, Hinrich. Dutch: Hendrik. Scandinavian: Hen(d)rik. Polish: Henryk. Czech: Jindrich. Finnish: Heikki. Hungarian: Henrik; See also Imre.

    Pet forms: English: Hal, Hank, Harry. Spanish: Quique. German: Heino, Heinz. Low German: Heiko, Henning. Danish: Henning.

    Source(s): ancestry.com
  • Jacy
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    Harry is a variant of the name Henry (also a common nickname for Henry.) The meaning of the names is, Home or House Ruler (ruler of the house.)

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    Having lots of hair.

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