Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Cars & TransportationMaintenance & Repairs · 1 decade ago

Ford Fiesta Zetec Oil change?

Hi

I have just realized my mothers car (ford feista 1.2) Has not been served for over 5 years. We cannot afford to put it in for a major service so i was going to do some of the stuff myself.

I'm planning to do an oil change first of all. The oil is very thick and jet black at the moment. Should I use engine flush as i have heard some horror stories?

Also i was going to put some cheap oil in for a week and then do another oil change again with expensive oil to try and get some more of the black oil out of the engine. Also do 2 changes of the oil filter.

Should i do this or should i just go for the one oil change?

Thanks for the help.

9 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    I agree with the general trend of answers and Big John in particular. A good, thorough oil and filter change and then see how it goes..

    Engine flushes are an American fad and both unnecessary and sometimes dangerous if they dislodge particles which block oilways. They're only relevant if the engine has been standing around for years and the oil has turned to something akin to tar.

    I'd get yourself a Haynes manual for the car and look through that, particularly the servicing schedules. They're very good at detailing the various tasks and explaining how to do them.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Just use engine flush and allow the car to run so the flush can circulate within the engine. Once this is done, drain the oil and replace the filter, you should also change the sump plug as the car has not been serviced in 5 years. Don't bother with two oil changes, it only needs one. Be sure to use the right oil grade to ensure the oil is not too thick or thin as this can cause problems in the future.

    Source(s): Working as a mechanic
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  • 4 years ago

    Ford Fiesta Oil Change

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  • 4 years ago

    Ford Fiesta Oil Filter

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  • Nomadd
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    The engine flush stories are true. You don't want to break all that junk loose at once. Just use good high detergent oil. Don't try to save ten bucks by using cheap stuff, even on the first change. It might take several changes before it's clean again. And use the thinnest oil the manual recommends. It will flow through all the tight spots and clean things up better.

    There are oils made for high mileage engines. They have a little more detergent and gasket conditioners.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I would go for changing the oil and filter first. Get the engine up to normal running temp, and drain while hot. leave it to drain for about 1 hour. Fit new filter, and fill with a good quality synthetic oil. Keep an eye on the colour of the oil over the next few weeks, and if it goes excessively black, then change it and the filter again.

    Source(s): 60 years of car maintenance experience
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  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    Having built and know people who still build performance racing engines, I think your problem may NOT be the viscosity (thickness) of the oil. I am leaning towards a different solution. Check your Oil Pressure Sending Unit. If you can get to it safely, unplug it from the wiring harness and check ohm's resistance with engine off (not running). start the engine then preferably cold and check the resistance, finally check the resistance when the engine is at operating temperature. You should see an increase in resistance from 0 to around 25K to 40K Ohms and then a slight drop from the "Cold" measurement when at "Operating" temp. If the sending unit tests within parameters according to your Chilton or Haynes Manual, then you'll need to have the Oil Pump tested. That's when you'll really need a mechanic if that's bad unless you feel you can do that test. It will involve buying some things custom to do it. Oil viscosity is set by the manufacturer, look in the owner's manual. Some vehicles may have recommended oil viscosity written on the oil cap or filler tube. Depending on your average temperatures where you live should also be your guide. Talk to your Oil Supplier, they can make good recommendations. My personal brand is Havoline.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Since it has been a while, I would use an engine flush. Just after you use the flush, let it drain for a while. Two oil changes in a short period would kind of just burn money. Just flushing it and letting it drain well would be a world of difference. Hope this helps you.

    Source(s): Experience.
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  • 1 decade ago

    Go for the one change and one oil filter. I cant see doing two making a difference. I wouldnt worry about expensive oil either: that is a false economy.

    Source(s): Haynes Manual Entheusiast :)
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