Background Blur Effect?

How to get a Background Blur Effect when taking close up shots using a semi pro cameras.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    in DSLR camera's there will be a setting called Aperture Priority on your camera dile it will be either A or AV set your camera to this.

    what Aperture does is control the depth of Field which is how blurry the background of a photo is, the higher the F-stop number is the more of the photo will be in focus, and the lower the number the less of the photo will be in focus.

    if all else fails, in photo shop, open the photo and press control J and this will give you a new layer. on this new layer go to adjustments and blur, Gaussian blur and set it to how blurry you want the whole picture.

    then click the little picture of an eye in the layers palette so the background layer is visible and lasso the area you don't want blurry, the go to - select - refine edge - and feather the selection to about 40 is what i use, then make the top layer visible again and use the eraser tool to earse the selection and you should have a blurred background

    Source(s): experience in both CS4 and Photoshop Elements
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  • 1 decade ago

    By semi pro camera do you mean a DSLR? because if it's not a DSLR it's not really semi pro and will have a tiny sensor (assuming it's digital) and camera with tiny sensors are hard to blur backgrounds with, anyway the best way to get the background out of focus is to use as wide an aperture as possible.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Adjust your depth of field, you can set a shallow depth of field in aperture priority mode or set your camera to a automatic macro mode and it will do it for you, focus on the subject and snap.

    if all else fails, take the photo and use the blur tool in a photo editor and just go over the background.

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  • 4 years ago

    Set the camera for f/stop priority. (See your manual for instructions) Use the largest opening for the most background blur. Not knowing the lens speed of your camera let me give an example. Lenses on cameras today vary from f/4, f/3.5 and so on. So set the aperture at the widest lens opening. It is also most likely engraved on the lens rim. So the camera will now set the proper shutter speed needed for the correct exposure by itself. Good Luck!

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  • EDWIN
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    You are asking about Depth of Field (DOF).

    DOF is controlled by three things:

    1) Lens focal length.

    2) The f-stop chosen.

    3) Subject distance.

    For a good explanation and a DOF Calculator go to:

    http://www.dofmaster.com/dofjs.html With the Calculator you can compute DOF for any combination of focal length, f-stop and subject distance imaginable.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    focus the camera lens on an object close in front of you and the background will be blurred. if you wish to have the blur without the object in it, manually focus the object on the close object, then remove the object, and CLICK! you got it

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  • 4 years ago

    This site contains photography tutorials and courses for you to study at your own pace. https://tr.im/ZbMXr

    To get started, all you need is a camera, whether it be the latest digital camera or a traditional film-based apparatus!

    Read about what is ISO, aperture and exposure. Discover different types of lenses and flash techniques. Explore portrait photography, black and white photography, HDR photography, wedding photography and more.

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  • 1 decade ago

    (A)perture Priority

    Open aperture to lowest f number available (physically widest)

    Zoom out

    Move close to subject while maintaining focus on subject.

    Enjoy blurred background

    Research "Depth of Field" or "DOF" for complete details.

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  • 3 years ago

    1

    Source(s): Shoot Incredible Pictures http://PhotographyMasterclass.enle.info/?Aqq7
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  • 1 decade ago

    A lensbaby

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