Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Cars & TransportationMaintenance & Repairs · 1 decade ago

Problem with Nissan Micra battery drain?

Hello! I am having trouble with my Nissan Micra 2003... I have never used Yahoo answers before so I'll try to put in a much detail as possible!!

I have had my car for about 6 months and until recently was using ever single day. I have just got a new job which means I only need to use it about once a week and it seems that something is draining the battery. The battery is relatively new (few months old) after last time it was left standing so I was surprised when this happened again. It will jump start fine and being left for the odd few days. Last time that its happened it had been standing for a week or a bit more.

I have tried testing the drain on the battery with an amp meter and when we put out the fuse for the immobiliser the drain is much better. The immobiliser seems to be draining the battery. I have heard that this is quite a common problem with Micras but I'm not sure what the actual fault is and how this can be fixed? I was hoping someone would know a quick fix? Any advice would be lovely!!

Thank you!

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Sounds like a faulty connection in the electric system, possibly something is constantly switched on i.e. radio lights etc, and so is draining the battery in which case youll need a new motherboard.

    try a new battery in it first though, the battery might be faulty, and that will cost you much less.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    This is a fairly common fault with most modern cars nowadays. My 40 year old car with no fancy electrics will easily take being left for a month and still fire up first try, yet my modern car with alarm, led clock, cd/radio etc needs jump started after 4 or 5 days of inactivity, maybe 2 weeks if I don't set the alarm, and lock it manually without the plipper.

    Short of disabling the immobiliser or taking it for a run once a week, there's not much you can do.

    You can get little solar trickle chargers that put a slight charge into the battery via the cigarette lighter socket, but I've never used one so I don't know if they're any good.

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  • Mark B
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    It most likely is the battery isn't getting enough charge on the time the car is out Modern cars use a lot of power even when sitting on the driveway. Add that to the fact most of us drive with the radio on, the blowers at full speed and in many cases air con on too. The only fix in my mind is to use the car more and give it a good run at the weekends. This will also help keep all the mechanical parts from seizing up.

    Source(s): Mechanic.
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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    New batteries can be faulty. Are you certain it is new? If so it is under guarantee for at least 12 months and the supplier should be able to test it for you and replace if necessary. If it doesn't take and hold a charge properly it will self discharge what little is in it. Also make sure your alternator is putting out a full charge. You can check this easily by switching on the headlamps whilst facing a wall/fence at night. Rev the engine up and down from tick over. The headlamps should brighten as you rev. If not and they stay the same intensity, the alternator is not charging properly.

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  • I fink
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    Disconnect the battery next time you leave it,and if it won`t start the engine when you reconnect it,you`ll know it`s the battery.

    You could start the engine every other day to keep it charged.

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