What are the lanyard colours for the different (British) regiments on No.2 Dress uniform?

I think white is for Royal Engineers and black for the Royal Artillery but what about other regiments such as PWRR or the Coldstream guards?

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
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    Many regiments do not wear lanyards, Artillery is white, Royal engineers purple, AGC Red & Blue, RLC Blue & Gold, Paras, Red, Blue, Breen, for 1,2 & 3 PARA respectively. Duke of lancasters Maroon, Yorkshire Regiment Black. Footguards do not wear lanyards. the remaining regiments that I have missed I don't know due to recent amalgamations. Its worth noting that it is a tradition in some infantry units for the regiemntal signallers to wear a white lanyard instead of the regimental colour.

    EDIT: My mistake about the engineers or is it my colour blindness! As for the common fairly tail about the gunners lanyards it is just that a fairly tail!

    "Origins of The Lanyard & The classic "Sapper Leg-pull"

    There has long been a tale-usually told by Sappers-about the Gunners wearing a white lanyard for cowardice, allegedly for deserting their guns. Of course, the story is nothing more than a piece of leg pulling. The tradition of ‘winding up’ stems from the age-old rivalry between the two ‘sister’ corps founded under the Board of Ordnance and trained together in Woolwich. However, I am still being asked by Gunners whether this story is true, so it is time it was put to rest.

    Lanyards associated with dress came into use in the late 19th Century, when field guns, such as the 12 and 15 pounders, used ammunition which had fuzes set with a fuze key. The key was a simple device, and every man had one, attached to a lanyard worn around the neck. The key itself was kept in the breast pocket until needed. The lanyard was a simple piece of strong cord, but it was gradually turned into something a bit more decorative, smartened up with ‘blanco’, and braided, taking its present form.

    Prior to the South African War, Gunners were issued with steel folding hoof picks, carried on the saddle or in the knife. In about 1903 these were withdrawn and replaced with jack knives, which were carried in the left breast pocket of the Service Dress attached to a lanyard over the left shoulder. In the war years that followed, the lanyard could be used as an emergency firing lanyard for those guns which had a trigger firing mechanism, allowing the gunner to stand clear of the gun’s recoil.

    The question of which shoulder bore the lanyard depends on the date. There is no certainty about this, but the change from the left shoulder to the right probably took place at about the time of the Great War, when a bandolier was introduced, because it was worn over the left shoulder. But there are some who insist that 1924 was the date of change, when sloping of rifles over the left shoulder would soil the white lanyard.

    Eventually in 1933, the end of the lanyard was simply tucked into the breast pocket without the jack-knife, though many will remember that it was often kept in place with the soldier’s pay book! On the demise of ‘Battle Dress’, the lanyard disappeared for a short time, but returned as part of the dress of the Royal Regiment of Artillery in 1973.

    It may surprise many readers that this particular piece if leg-pulling is repeated in various forms. The gold stripe in the Gunner stable belt stems from the colours of the uniform at the time the stable belt was introduced. It was not a question, as the jokers would have it, of yellow stripes for cowardice! Equally ludicrous is the suggestion that the Gunners has seven ‘flames’, as opposed to the sapper’s nine, because we lost two guns at some point in history!

    For those still plagued by jokers, the simplest answer to this kind of leg-pulling is to invite the joker to produce his evidence. No change to any of the Army’s dress regulations can take place without a formal order, and-let us be realistic! it is ridiculous to suppose that the Army Board in its wisdom would countenance the idea of a ‘badge of shame’ to be worn by any branch of the Service. It would guarantee that no one would ever join it! And since no such evidence exists, the joker’s story falls flat on its face. One might even ask why other arms and corps wear lanyard."

    Source(s): 19 years still serving. http://www.26thregra-asc.com/trra.html
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  • 5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    What are the lanyard colours for the different (British) regiments on No.2 Dress uniform?

    I think white is for Royal Engineers and black for the Royal Artillery but what about other regiments such as PWRR or the Coldstream guards?

    Source(s): lanyard colours british regiments 2 dress uniform: https://shortly.im/qyxYw
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  • 3 years ago

    British Army Dress Regulations

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  • mckey
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    Royal Engineers Stable Belt

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  • 1 decade ago

    Actually it`s Blue for the Royal Engineers, this used to be the colour of the Royal Artillery but their lanyard colour was changed to white after running away during some battle and the engineers taking over the Guns.

    The lanyard for the Royal Arny Medical Corps Is red and is a simple Loop,primarily the idea was to represent a tourniquet.

    Source(s): Ex Army Combat medic with 23 yrs service who has served with most regiments
    • chris5 years agoReport

      You are one of the gullible ones who believe the story of the white lanyard too oh well it takes all sorts. You show us proof of this and then I may believe you.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Blue Lanyard for the Royal Signals.

    http://www.samrainc.org/Historical%20Snippets/The%...

    Bands of the British Army - full dress uniforms

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FA62X9kHrDo

    Youtube thumbnail

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  • 1 decade ago

    Many Regiments and Corps have different coloured lanyards.Some don't wear lanyards,some have a different Pattern on the lanyard.

    Source(s): 16 yrs Army 2 yrs TA
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  • 5 years ago

    RAEC was Oxford and Cambridge Blue

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