What is the range of masses a star can have and be similar to the sun?

So, stars with half our sun's mass are red dwarfs, and stars 10 times our sun's mass are blue supergiants. Would a star 5 times its mass have similar properties to our sun? Would its use of the CNO cycle rather than the PP chain to fuse hydrogen have an influence on its eventual fate? It's just that... show more So, stars with half our sun's mass are red dwarfs, and stars 10 times our sun's mass are blue supergiants. Would a star 5 times its mass have similar properties to our sun? Would its use of the CNO cycle rather than the PP chain to fuse hydrogen have an influence on its eventual fate? It's just that brown dwarfs and red dwarfs etc seem to be neatly compartmentalised into certain masses and given certain properties, but what is the general category for stars like our sun, those which become red giants but never supernovae?

If anyone could link me to an article or something that addresses this, it would also be very much appreciated :)
Update: Thanks for the helpful answer ron. One thing..you said stars up to 8 solar masses become red giants, but that stars above 3 solar masses could fuse elements heavier than helium. So, just to check, stars between 3-8 solar masses can fuse helium into other elements, but still become red giants just like the sun... show more Thanks for the helpful answer ron. One thing..you said stars up to 8 solar masses become red giants, but that stars above 3 solar masses could fuse elements heavier than helium. So, just to check, stars between 3-8 solar masses can fuse helium into other elements, but still become red giants just like the sun will?
Also, is our sun completely incapable of fusing helium into other elements until it becomes a red giant? Cheers.
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