Anonymous
Anonymous asked in SportsMartial Arts · 1 decade ago

How to make my low kicks really powerful?

which muscles do they get power from

how to get better

how to aim better

where to aim

and how to land one propperly

when i do them, i can occasionally get one to land well, but when it does it has very little power and usually hits their knee or i hit with my foot which hurts

i have conditioned shins so they dont hurt much but yeah i wanna get them better any tips

Update:

wow thanks alot guys, these are all amazing answers too bad i cant pick all for best answers

11 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    The muscles that low kicks rely on, among others, are the core muscles of the upper body, the hip flexors, and the muscle groups that make up the thigh (quadriceps, hamstring, etc.) as well as the muscles and tendons that stabilize the knee and ankle joints.

    To get more accurate, try using a headache bag set low to the ground, at thigh height. This is basically a padded cylinder that has an elastic cord at top and another at bottom. These are attached to the floor and ceiling, or a tree limb, and the bottom attached to a weight of some kind that won't move. The height of the target is adjustable (up and down) so that you can work different attacks at different (correct) heights. The elasticity of the cords means that when you strike the target, it bounces away and snaps back, providing a dynamic, moving target for your attacks. These are relatively cheap - usually less than $30.00 - and can be found at many sporting goods stores which carry boxing or martial arts equipment. They are even cheaper and easier to find online. Work this target at mid-thigh height, and be sure to switch up your legs, as your opponent will not repeatedly expose the same side of their body as a target in actual practice.

    For power, you must work something heavy and dense. Some suggestions are:

    *A tire, mounted to something to keep it in place while you stomp, kick, and sweep.

    *A heavy bag, with or without a retention cord on bottom to improve return speed and reduce swinging.

    *A padded pole or post which is not apt to become structurally damaged.

    *A Wing Chun Dummy, if you have the means, lol.

    Where to aim: The mid thigh for roundhouse kicks, the back of the calf, where it is most muscled for sweeps, the quadriceps, knee, shin, or top of the foot for stomps.

    *Watch Marco Ruas's fight against Paul Varelans (way back in UFC 7) for an example of the damage that repeated thigh kicks can do against a much bigger opponent.

    *To properly execute a sweep (in the clinch) you must "pop" the muscle of your calf against the muscle of the opponent's calf. Almost a kick has to be used to knock the foot loose from the floor. A pulling, hooking type of motion will not work against anyone with experience or solid base/footwork.

    *For roundhouse kicks, do not kick with the "ball of the foot", or with the shin. Instead, kick with the hard structure of the ankle complex. With your toes pointed so that the top of your foot is in nearly a straight line with your shin, kick with the bones which make up your ankle. Against a soft target suck as the muscle of the thigh, or the lower side, even ribs, the ankle will not become injured. Be careful kicking with these bones if you think there is a chance you will hit the opponent's knee, though, as this could damage your ankle. It is important to note that you need to kick with the "front" of your ankle, and not with the side, which would be painful for you as much as for the opponent.

    Keep these basic principles in mind, train weekly for best results, and you will find that you are faster, strike harder, and more accurately within a short period of time. Good luck with your training, and let us know how it turns out!

    Source(s): 22 years martial arts experience: Former blackbelt-level hand-to-hand combat / self-defense / personal protection / weapons instructor.
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  • Alison
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    Even IF you were to master the kick technically that does not mean that you could actually apply it in a fight. It takes more than just knowing a technique to be a good fighter. You also need to learn how to land it and that takes strategy and some experience with a partner. If you are planning on learning how to kick at home who is going to correct you?

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  • Stormy
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    Night's answer is very comprehensive, all I can do is elaborate a little.

    The key muscles to work for a good low round kick are the core muscles. Power comes from the hips. For this work your abs, obliques and back muscles to get the good hip movement. Practice the proper body mechanics and try something like a core board for developing those muscles.

    The ideal target is the sciatic nerve, located in the outer side of the thigh.

    For help with your aim, practice with a partner on the thai pads. You'll soon get better.

    And remember a good thai kick requires cultivation and practice, practice, practice.

    Keep up the good work!

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  • 1 decade ago

    You mention shin kicks. The easiest place to use them effectively is to shin kick the inside of the opponents legs. most people attack the outside of the opponents leg. That is easier, but not as effective. The inside of the leg is much more sensitive and easier to injur. It does require a bit more skill to hit. Power is not what is important. Accuracy in hitting the correct target is much more important. Personally I like to either shin kick my opponents legs or toe kick them(on the inside of the leg). Drops them easily.

    Source(s): Over 41 years of martial arts training and research (since 1967) Over 35 years of teaching martial arts (since 1973)
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  • 5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    How to make my low kicks really powerful?

    which muscles do they get power from

    how to get better

    how to aim better

    where to aim

    and how to land one propperly

    when i do them, i can occasionally get one to land well, but when it does it has very little power and usually hits their knee or i hit with my foot which hurts

    i...

    Source(s): kicks powerful: https://tinyurl.im/eYvbu
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  • 1 decade ago

    You get the power from your hips, the more you swing them the stronger they'd be.

    You get better from practicing, hit the heavy bag, and pads.

    You aim better again by hitting the bag/pads.

    You aim just above the knee.

    You land it with your shin, snap it as soon as you hit and get back to your stance.

    Practice more, and has to be on a downward motion, remeber to stand on the ball of your foot when you kick.

    good luck!

    Source(s): my brain ;)
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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Really, you mainly need to just focus on using them, for like a month straight at least. Make them part of your regualr practice for at least that long, kicking into something that offers both resistance and recoil, like an old tire that requires power to indent it. Make it part of every sparring technique as much as you can, part of every slower technique practiced.

    Above all, use Bruce Lee's "startle response" training as a cue to your kicks. Bruce would practice sometimes while watching TV and advised that one should toos an attack every time he heard a new voice, every time a new face popped up, every time a suddent change of scene or lighting occurred. The point was, he gave himself an unpredictable EXTERNAL cue to shooting his attacks, which most MA teachers/ practitioners severely lack (and which keeps their practice from being realisitic, since you are always responding to an opponent).

    I remember I was training with this big tall kung fu guy years ago. He was quick in the hands and had some skills, so I had to be able to counter him without getting into a reach-versus-reach competition. I focuses on my low kicks for a couple of weeks before he and I had this discussion one day.

    He was getting a little cocky and made a little fake motion, testing my response. My reaction was an automatic shin kick, followed by an eye jab and ear cuff.--- Needless to say, he never got cocky or jumpy around me again. He even complimented me, and started sending some of his difficult students to train with me.

    DE-Bags, which the other guy called "headache bag", may help you work on timing and accuracy, but it won't help with developing power. (In fact, most boxing gyms use these things wrong by setting the tension too high, making the bag move like some strange vibrator. I've yet to see a human being move like a vibrator in all my years of fighting.)

    Better would be to stop by your local hardware store and make a little frame that suspends a 2X4 or 4X4 from a strong spring, kept at an angle. That way you've got both tension and a simulation of the human leg at a slightly angled lead leg position. This will encourage a quick witrthdrawal on your part, since to let your leg drop too close in will cause you to be struck by the block as it springs back.

    Fancy Wing Chun dummies and all that are nice, but they really don't do much for promoting power in your kicks. There's a actually a book on various different types of wooden dummies (since the Wing Chun version is NOT the only one out there). I think it was called "Hall of Wooden Men".

    Another thing to do is to use resistance bands for training your kicks. Ringside and Everlast both have adjustable bands for the feet that are intended for training boxers not to spread their feet too wide or going too short. These are excellent for getting resistance in low kicks. (I'd advice using an Ace bandage on your ankles under these, to avoid the friction burns.)

    Likewise, you can also use light ankle weights to offer more variance to your training and mess with your accuracy a little more. (Again, the Ace bandage helps.)

    Now, let me give you something no one else here has, just to keep this place from looking so much like Wikipedia.

    Source(s): Mook Jong Construction Manual:.. on a Budget --- Michael Janick * Low Kicks: Aiming for Maximum Destruction --- Fred Hutchinson * Power Kicker resistance band http://www.amazon.com/Strength-Trainer-Covered-Cor... * No Holds Barred Fighting: Kicking Bible... for MMA & the Street --- Mark Hatmaker * Ultimate Kicking Drills-- Sang Kim
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  • 1 decade ago

    A downward stomp with heel or foot edge is probably the most naturally powerful kick you can use as it has gravity on it's side whereas to kick hi you must fight gravity to some extent,

    The damage you can do with these direct stomp kicks is tremondous which is the reason only circular kicks to the legs are allowed in MMA .

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  • 3 years ago

    1

    Source(s): Eliminate Sciatica Forever http://ReliefSciaticaNaturally.enle.info/?7zPR
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  • 1 decade ago

    having a strong core, and using your whole body into the kick will make it powerful this can be achieved by proper form when kicking, muay thai has the strongest low kicks out of the styles of combat, in my opinion of course but it has been documented. click on this link and it will show you how to throw a power full kick. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s5iTWCwlZyM

    Youtube thumbnail

    hope this helps.

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