If you pretend to be someone you're not for long enough, do you become that "other" person?

This is an offhand question I decided to ask, because I've just received my (replacement) copy of Kurosawa's "Kagemusha" in the mail and have often wondered at the way the impersonator picks up so well on how to "become" the Lord Takeda Shingen, while still not being him. The humans are... show more This is an offhand question I decided to ask, because I've just received my (replacement) copy of Kurosawa's "Kagemusha" in the mail and have often wondered at the way the impersonator picks up so well on how to "become" the Lord Takeda Shingen, while still not being him. The humans are fooled, but the animals are not--can one truly shed a persona and become another and find fulfillment and personal purpose this way? I would be interested to hear personal views or experiences of anyone who has tried so hard to be someone else that he or she has caught an "essence" of this "other" or found the other within oneself. Thanks for your responses!
Update: I put this question in R&S because I am looking for a philosophical/spiritual viewpoint on the phenomenon, i.e., the experience of the ego or self when it finds that being what others believe is "someone else," one can find the core truth or "spirit" of the one impersonated and bridge the... show more I put this question in R&S because I am looking for a philosophical/spiritual viewpoint on the phenomenon, i.e., the experience of the ego or self when it finds that being what others believe is "someone else," one can find the core truth or "spirit" of the one impersonated and bridge the distance between the two personae, thus creating a perfect empathy. A step on the path to oneness, perhaps. By the end of Kagemusha, is the impersonator still himself? Or is he like the ghost of Shingen walking the battlefields, a shadow without absolute ego-permanence?
Update 2: Sorry to blather, but I just realized another great example of this phenomenon from a book I read long ago. It was called Double Star and was an early Heinlein novel about an actor who plays the part of a politician who dies and thus leaves the actor stranded in his persona. He then lives out the rest of his life... show more Sorry to blather, but I just realized another great example of this phenomenon from a book I read long ago. It was called Double Star and was an early Heinlein novel about an actor who plays the part of a politician who dies and thus leaves the actor stranded in his persona. He then lives out the rest of his life as this politician. It was as if he took the image of this "other" and made it his own, drawing from the power of his new position and, in a sense, achieving a synthesis. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_Star
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