ilovemax asked in PetsHorses · 1 decade ago

pirouette on horse back - HELP!?

how do i get my horse to do a pirouette?

i want to know what I have to do, because i need to know what do do with my arms and legs and seat and aids basically. i have a forrward pony, so he will be able to do it fine as he does dressage.

i just need to know what I have to do. Instructions please! haha

thanks for answers i reli need help =D

Update:

P.S. if you call it something else or you dont know what it is... type it in on youtube, it will show you =D i really need help quick, coz i have to do a GCSE in it tomorrow!

Update 2:

weeell i only need to do a half pirouette - on a re-reading :S so i was just wondering if there was anyway of just making him do it or does that not work?

15 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    First of all what the heck is a pirouette??? and second, if you want to learn whatever this is, I suggest you learn it from a expirenced riding instructor, not outta a book or by someone telling you. It's so much harder, plus if you do it w/an instructor, you'll know your doing it right! ~HB2MH~

    (I took my last edit out, got ya'll mad at me lol)

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  • 4 years ago

    While the leg yield is a basic movement found in first level tests, the pirouette is an upper level movement that a low level horse will probably not be doing. Either way, it is all about a weight shift and leg placement. To leg yield to the right, you would place weight in your right seat bone and move the left leg back. The inside or right leg continues to softly push the horse forward. It's usually easiest if you visualize a rope pulling you forward and to the right while you do the movement. Looking to the letter you want to go to is also necessary. Do not over do the leg or you'll end up with the haunches coming in. The leg yield should basically be with a straight body, neck bent slightly to the left. Some common errors are bending the neck too much which allows the shoulder to drop in and then the horse becomes crooked. The other is to not use the inside leg and then the horse goes sideways too much and not forward as well. Doing a leg yield across the diagonal works well if you do a short leg yield, straighten and go forward a few strides, then leg yield again. Pirouettes at the walk are created using fist a larger circle. Create haunches in and then ask the horse to basically walk in a smaller circle with the haunches in. The should must move around the outside of the circle with the hind end in the middle of the circle. Doing too small a circle at the beginning can cause the horse to just spin around the hind feet instead of stepping. The hind feet should continue stepping thruout the movement.

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  • 1 decade ago

    a pirouette is one of the highest level movements. It's unfair to your pony to make it do anything like that without all the proper training to get their. Lots of horses and ponies aren't even capable of this movement. You should be working with a highly experienced dressage trainer.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I hope you mean a walk pirouette because there is no way you should even attempt canter pirouette until you have mastered the other lateral movements and have a good instructor.

    He's a website detailing the aids for walk pirouette:

    http://www.equusite.com/articles/riding/ridingPivo...

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  • 1 decade ago

    Are you sure it's really not meant as a turn on the haunches? You do this on the rail to change direction from a halt or walk. It's much more basic to teach... A pirouette is done at a high level for horse and rider!

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  • 1 decade ago

    I have no idea what a GSCE or whatever is, but if you just need to know the details on how a pirouette is performed, rider aides, and what the horse should be doing:

    A pirouette is an extremely collected CIRCLE. It is a like a turn on the haunches and it is performed at the walk or canter only.

    A horse must have years of training behind him before beginning this type of high school maneuver. It must be completely supple, and move well from a lateral aides and indirect reins. It must collect well and have proper impulsion from the hind end, as well as needing to have a strong hind end and the ability to lighten the forehand and bring the haunches well under him.

    The rider must have years of experience, impeccable control over all aides (from head to heel), and should have experience with performing this move on an experienced horse first before attempting to teach it to a horse that doesn't know how.

    This is a serious dressage movement, and and it very easy to screw up, injure the horse, or sour the horse to collection. Too many people think tightening the reins is equivalent to collecting the horse, and too many people think a horse going quick is a horse with impulsion, and too many people think because their horse will hold his nose in he is a dressage horse.

    If you are trying to do this move without experience, training, an instructor, and a horse that knows the move - PLEASE do not try this.

    The rider must sit deep in the saddle and create a forward moving, collected canter with strong impulsion. A halft halt will usually the cue the horse to prepare for a pirouette, and if they were preparing to pirouette to the left, the rider would use the outside (right) rein to circle the horse - literally neck rening - this keeps the horse straight and prevents it from collapsing its neck or over bending to the left. The left rein is also used as a slight guide to the left circle and to prevent the horse from turning his nose outward (right). Lateral aide is applied from the right leg and the horse is encouraged to canter a circle to the left. The hind legs are allowed to move in a circle, but the ideal circle should be about 20" around. It is literally a 20" circle.

    This is an upper level dressage move, that highly trained horses and riders can perform - this takes years to build up the collection, musculature, and suppleness to perform. Usually horses at the 4th level and above that would be performing this move are ridden in a double bridle, which offers more control.

    An attempt to perform this move by inexperienced hands will create a horse with a harsh mouth, stiff neck, reluctance to submit to lateral aides, refusal to work, and can even damage suspensories and hips.

    A walk pirouette, which I think is called for in 3rd level, is extremely similar, just done at the walk, not the canter. Again, the horse must have complete collection, and must be able to create a collected walk before a walk pirouette can be attempted.

    Here are some pirouettes in action courtesy of YouTube posts:

    This one is OK- this is a well schooled horse, but obviously still working on it, notice the suspension in the stride, the deep seat of the rider, and how it seems like nothing is happening between the pair and the horseis doing what it is supposed to do.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=659jBfIBJyo

    Youtube thumbnail

    Perfect pirouette of an Olympic level horse Grand Prix horse

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gg4hartoXJ4

    Youtube thumbnail

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    This is a very advanced dressage movement. Are You able to ride pirouette in walk? You say that your pony is very forward,but for this movement you will need a lot of collection. At what level are You riding dressage tests? We need more information.

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  • 1 decade ago

    You.re doing a GCSE on pirouette? What the hell subject is that?

    Anyway, is it canter pirouette you mean? Because you have to start with walk pirouette to make sure you have the aids right, then work your very collected canter in smaller and smaller circles until your horse can perform the turn still keeping the canter rythmn but with the inside hindleg not moving from the spot. It's not something a horse can just DO if you get the aids right, it's a test of the horses collection and athletic ability. A horse that can do it, will not require much in the way of aids anyway, as it's an advanced move

    PS to you in the US, it's a sort of posh version of a rollback

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  • 1 decade ago

    What is a pirouette? Is it a dressage move or something? Anyways, dont ask us, ask an expierenced trainer.

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  • 1 decade ago

    how in the world cud a horse do that?????????????????????????????????????????????

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