Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Food & DrinkCooking & Recipes · 1 decade ago

Whats the best way to cook a Haunch of Venison?

16 Answers

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  • Daisy
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Haunch of Venison with Red Wine, Black Pepper and Thyme

    Servings: 4

    Level of difficulty: Easy

    Preparation Time: 40 minutes

    Cooking Time: 25 minutes

    Ingredients

    For the potato gratin

    500g Potatoes, peeled and thinly sliced

    1/2 tsp fine sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

    1 pinch grated Nutmeg

    1 garlic clove, finely chopped

    1.2 litres whipping cream

    For the venison

    1kg haunch of venison, bones removed

    1 tsp Salt

    2 tbsp cracked Black peppercorns

    1 tbsp vegetable oil

    5 tbsp chilled butter, diced

    1/2 tbsp thyme leaves, or 1/2 tsp dried thyme

    300ml Red wine

    1/2 tsp Sugar

    thyme sprigs, to garnish

    Method

    1. Preheat the oven to 160C/gas 2. For the potato gratin, put the potato slices into a large bowl and season with salt, pepper and grated nutmeg. Rub the seasonings over the slices to ensure that they are evenly distributed.

    2. Mix the garlic with the cream and pour over the potatoes. Tip the mixture into an ovenproof gratin dish, smoothen the top and cover with greaseproof paper. Bake for 1 hour, until the potatoes are soft and the top is golden.

    4. Increase the oven temperature to 180C/gas 4. Season the venison generously with salt. Press all but 1 teaspoon of the black pepper over the meat.

    5. Heat a heavy ovenproof frying pan over a moderate heat. Add the oil and 2 tablespoons of butter. Once the butter begins to foam, add the venison. Brown the meat on all sides, and transfer to the oven. Roast for 15 minutes.

    6. When cooked, transfer the meat to a warmed plate, cover with foil and leave to rest while you make the sauce.

    7. Pour any fat out of the pan and add the thyme, remaining pepper and the red wine. Cook down until there's about 6 tablespoons of liquid left in the pan.

    8. Remove the pan from the heat and whisk in the remaining butter. Taste the sauce for seasoning, adding a little sugar and salt if necessary.

    9. Carve the venison into 1cm slices, adding any juices to the sauce. Arrange the meat on warmed plates, garnish with a sprig of thyme and pour over the sauce. Serve with creamy potato gratin.

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  • 1 decade ago

    1 six-pound haunch of Venison 1 Bottle claret or burgundy 1 large onion, sliced 1 bay leaf 1 crushed clove garlic 3 juniper berries 6 strips fat bacon - - - - ~ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ~ - - - - - - - - - If the lower part of the leg is used, remove the shank bone from the venison. Place the meat in a large bowl, & marinate overnight in the wine with the Onion, Garlic, Bay Leaf & Juniper Berries. Preheat oven to hot 450 degrees. Remove the meat from the marinade & skewer & tie it into a compact shape. Strain and reservee the marinade. Insert a thermometer in the thickest portion of muscle & place the meat on a rack in an open roasting pan. Place the bacon strips on top of the meat. Roas the meat twenty minutes. Reduce the oven temp. to moderate, 325 degrees & cook 15-18 min per pound to an internal temperature of 140 degrees for very rare; 150 degrees for medium-well done. While the meat is roasting, be sure to baste occasionally with the marinade. Serve with boiled potatoes

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  • indie
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    First of all, with any wild meat you want to make sure that any blood is drained off or you will get a gamy (strong) flavor. If it's frozen, thaw and drain it well. Also, wild game usually has much less fat than commercially raised meat so you want to add some. If you are going to roast it, I find that laying a couple of strips of bacon over the meat works well. Season with garlic and fresh black pepper. Usually the juices don't make a very good gravy. Another thing I sometimes do is sprinkle Lipton's tomato/onion soup mix on the meat and then lay the strips of bacon on top.

    A few times, on the BBQ we cooked a venison roast and a roast beef together wrapped in foil. this turned out really moist and tasty.

    Happy Cooking

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Roast Haunch of Venison Stuffed with Wild Mushroom Deuxelle and Wild Rice Recipe

    Ingredients:

    7 pounds deboned and butterflied haunch of venison.

    1 1/2 pound of wild or domestic mushrooms (duexelle or coarsely chopped)

    2 med. Onions chopped

    6 cloves garlic , minced

    2 teaspoons each herb: Rosemary , thyme , sage , marjoram

    7 juniper berries .crushed

    2 cups red wine reduced to 1/2

    1/4 cup olive oil (ex virgin)

    1 big handful of chopped Italian Parsley

    1/3 cup bread crumbs

    1/2 cup pare - cooked wild rice

    3 Tbs butter

    Salt and pepper to taste

    3 Tbs coarse ground prepared mustard

    1 egg

    Directions:

    First, to make the stuffing saute in butter 1 chopped onion and 3 cloves minced garlic, add chopped mushrooms, cook 5 mins, and add the parsley and rice, and 1 tsp of each herb. Set aside to cool; Mix in bread crumbs, egg, salt and pepper.

    Prepare the marinade with the reduced red wine, 3 cloves minced garlic, the herbs, olive oil, and chopped onion. Marinate the venison at least over night. The following day salt and pepper meat, and rub the mustard into the meat, from this point you'll wish to stuff the roast and tie it to help keep the stuffing in, I use a net bag from the butcher shop. From here, in a large roasting pan heat 1/4 cup olive oil and brown the roast on all sides, pour remaining marinade into roasting pan, and roast at 375 degrees, using a thermometer till desired doneness baste with marinade, last 35-45 minutes of cooking

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  • 1 decade ago

    Marinate, butterfly and grill it.

    For a haunch, because the meat is so thick, butterflying it will open it up and make it a bit thinner and easier to cook. And with venison, low & slow is often a good solution.

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  • lou
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    Haunch of Venison with Maderia Sauce

    Origin: British Period: Traditional

    Ingredients

    1 hauch of venison (about 5kg) boned and rolled

    2 carrots

    2 onions<

    1 bulb of garlic

    4 cloves

    10 juniper berries

    1 bouquet garni (aromatic mix made of ½ leek, celery stick, thyme, bay leaf, all tied up with string)

    5ml olive oil

    50g butter

    10ml red wine vinegar

    250ml port

    300ml maderia

    500ml red wine

    salt and freshly-ground black pepper to taste

    In a large roasting pan, brown the venison on each side until nicely coloured. Season the meat well then set aside to rest.

    Next roughly chop the vegetables, add them to the roasting pan and cook them off in the pan juices until nicely caramelized. Add the vinegar and stir the vegetables continually until the liquid has evaporated completely. At this point add the Madeira and cook until it has reduced to a syrupy consistency.

    Next add the red wine and cook it for 10 minutes or until the alcohol contained has evaporated, then add the stock and the meat.

    Transfer the meat back to the roasting dish and cover with a lid (or with foil). Place in an oven pre-heated to 180°C and cook the meat for 20 minutes per kilo for a rare roast (ad an additional 50 minutes to the cooking time for a medium roast). At the end of this cooking time cooking set the meat aside to rest. Pass the cooking liquid trough a sieve and reduce it to 1/3. Rectify the seasoning, whisk the butter into the sauce and serve as soon as possible.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Butcher it into more manageable pieces: Roasts, steaks, stew cubes and freeze what you're not going to use right away. Or did you mean: Haunch of Venison (MRC) Hash House Harriers?

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  • Claire
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    I've always found that a slow cooked stew is the best way since it can be a bit tough sometimes. If it's the first time you've had it then it might give you the sh!ts because it's a very rich meat. Bloody delicious though.

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  • 1 decade ago

    IT DEPENDS WHETHER IT'S A DOE OR BUCK + THE AGE IS A FACTOR ALSO , A BUCK ESPECIALLY AN OLDER ONE IS MOSTLY USED FOR STEWS , ROASTS ,ETC , COOKED SLOWLY AT A LOW TEMP . YOU CAN STILL USE IT FOR FAHITAS , STEAKS + THAT SORT OF THING , BUT I'VE FOUND IT REALLY HELPS TO PAN SEAR THE SLICED MEAT IN OLIVE OIL JUST ENOUGH TO GET THE OUTSIDE OF THE MEAT , TO SEAL IN JUICES , THEN PROCEED AS YOU WISH , DONT GO FOR WELL DONE UNLESS YOU WANT IT TOUGH + GAMEY. W/ A DOE I'D GO FOR STEAKS , MUCH MORE TENDER + TASTY

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Throw it in a big pot with a tasty stock and lots of lovely vegetables, and then simmer for a couple of hours.

    I believe in the Keith Floyd school of cookery - minimal effort, just chuck things into a pot. Then you can enjoy a vat of red wine while the whole thing cooks itself.

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