Alion
Lv 7
Alion asked in Politics & GovernmentGovernment · 1 decade ago

Republicans: Why did Bush veto the spending measure for health and education programs?

On Tuesday,Bush vetoed the measure. He blamed Democrats for a tax and spend philosophy,saying:"This year alone,leaders in Congress are proposing to spend $22 million

more than my budget provides."

Democrat Rep.David Obey said,"This is a bipartisan bill supported by over 50 Republicans. There has been virtually

no criticism of it's contents. It is clear the only reason the President vetoed this bill is pure politics."

The House fell 3 votes short of a veto-proof margin as it sent the measure to Bush.

Meanwhile,the $471 billion defense budget gives the Pentagon a 9 percent,$40 billion budget increase. This will

help to provide for new and expensive weapons systems

like the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter($6.3 billion),the Navy's DD

destroyer($2.8 billion) and the new Virginia-class submarine

($3.1 billion).

So what do you think about that?

9 Answers

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  • ?
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    To distract us from this:

    Last week, Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke testified to Congress that the economy would "slow noticeably" this year and likely get worse before getting better. Yesterday on ABC News's This Week, Sen. Chris Dodd (D-CT), chairman of the Senate Banking Committee, said of a possible recession: "[I]t's certainly pointing in that direction. We hope that's not the case, but there are many people who watch this minute to minute and would have drawn that conclusion." America's economic fundamentals have been weak for some time now. Since 2000, investment growth has been anemic, productivity growth has declined, and income growth has stagnated. Weak income and job growth and the decline of health care and retirement benefits have already squeezed the middle class and made Americans more vulnerable to economic downturns. When these trends are combined with the subprime mortgage crisis and the ensuing slowing of the housing market, the collapsing dollar, and the enormous cost of the Iraq war adding to the country's ever-growing debt, the economic slowdown is likely to hit Americans quite hard. Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY) found Bernanke's testimony disquieting. "I'm very concerned that there may be a bigger storm on the horizon," he said. Approximately 48 percent of Americans feel that the economy is already in recession, including 69 percent of black Americans. Another poll found that two-thirds of Americans worry that economic conditions are getting worse, "by far the highest number since 1992," and four in ten say recession is likely next year.

    Last spring, Bernanke downplayed the broader effects of the subprime mortgage crisis, suggesting that the effects seemed "likely to be contained" to the housing sphere. Last week, Bernanke admitted that "[a]lthough the problems with subprime mortgages initiated the financial turmoil, credit concerns quickly spilled over into a number of other areas." He added, "A sharp increase in foreclosed properties for sale could also weaken the already struggling housing market and thus, potentially, the broader economy." An October real estate report showed that U.S. home prices fell nationwide in August for the eighth consecutive month, in the ten largest cities falling five percent from a year ago, the biggest monthly drop since June 1991. Remarking on the falling housing sales, Dodd noted that it was "the first time since the Great Depression we've had two successive years of predictions of housing sales declines." Housing had been the one sector through which many middle class families could get ahead through investment. A report released late last month by the congressional Joint Economic Committee, however, stated that "families, neighborhood property values, and state and local government will lose billions of dollars as two million subprime mortgage homes are foreclosed." The housing crunch, dragging the whole economy down with it, demands the government's full attention. The most President Bush will admit thus far is that "housing is soft."

    A new report by the Joint Economic Committee estimates that the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have cost the average American family of four more than $20,000. The government is spending $2 billion per week to wage war in Iraq, and a Congressional Budget Office report estimated that the total cost of the war in Iraq could equal $2.4 trillion. Though the White House has asserted that it is "not worried" about the cost of war, it should be. The war is draining finite resources away from needed programs at home and abroad. Approximately $2.4 trillion is enough to "provide every college freshman in the country with a free, four year education at a private college or university; provide health care coverage to every American for one year; [or] pay off 26% of our current national debt."

    The dollar fell to a new low against the euro on Friday, propelled by Bernanke's glum economic forecast and by signals from the Chinese government that it would "readjust" some of its U.S. Treasuries holdings from dollars to other currencies. A weak dollar is likely to affect average Americans at the gas pump, since "crude oil is priced in dollars, and oil producers, especially members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, want to be compensated for the dollar's decline." As oil approaches the unprecedented price of $100 a barrel, the average cost of gasoline continues to rise, surpassing $3 per gallon last week, a rise of over 81 cents from last year. Gas prices are expected to rise another 20 cents over the next two to three weeks, making holiday travel more expensive. Sen. Sam Brownback (R-KS) said, "When those gas prices get up to $3 a gallon, it seems to hit some sort of psychological point in consumer's mind that 'I have less to spend,' and that's a reality for them." Before the holiday recess, Congress should pass a final energy bill that will establish a 35 mpg standard and require utilities to draw 15 percent of their electricty from renewable sources by 2020.

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  • gollub
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    i do no longer have faith Dems with social subjects and that i mistrust the Reps only approximately as plenty. while Clinton replaced into interior the White domicile, Hillary launched into a plenty publicized attempt to clean up the well-being care issues, besides the undeniable fact that, mid way interior the direction of the Clintons have been given their choker chains yanked by using the drug companies and the docs institutions who sell off as plenty money into their coffers as they do the Repubs. So she bailed out on it and supply up even although she had a Dem White domicile and a very Dem Congress. while the Dems communicate do no longer consume that Elmer it might desire to no longer be pudding/.

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  • 1 decade ago

    So do you think all Republicans support Bushs actions. He has spent, spent, spent like a democrat his entire term as President. His restraint now is surprising. Spending has been out of control. The bill will raise taxes. The war is spending will decrease as our troops continue to reduce violence in Irac and our military begin thier withdraws next year.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Lets see, museums for prisons, sailing lessons, Portuguese as a second language are among the things the bill would have paid for. Weapons systems defend the country. What good does sailing lessons provide?

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  • 1 decade ago

    Because he wouldn't help anyone but himself and hey remember the stem cell veto-that could have saved many lives but the evil one can't do that!

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    No money for the big oil companies.

    When was the last time a desease was declared cured.

    Right Polio. The War machine needs Blood, Oil.

    How many Iraquis were on the planes on 9-11?

    People wake up! register to vote.

    And GO VOTE!!!!!! anything but Republican.

    nuff said

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    You want the rich to pay more? For government healthcare, this is a joke. There is enough to pay, strong defense is key, you are wrong.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Thank God he vetoed it! Another step to Socialism we can't afford

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  • 1 decade ago

    It was full of pork spending - and as we all know pork isn't healthy for us.

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