C4 Snake asked in Consumer ElectronicsTVs · 1 decade ago

Television On Standby?

How much electricity does a television use on standby compare to one that is switched on (as a percentage if possible)

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9 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favourite answer

    a tv left on stanby will use at least 70% of the electricity to when it is turned on, it is always better to turn off,

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  • 1 decade ago

    Our television uses 36/37 Watts when on, and 6 Watts when off, so that's about 16% of the 'on' power.

    To give an idea, 1 Watt of power on all years costs around £1. I think it's actually a little less than that, but with energy prices rising, it's still a good rough guide. So turning your television off at night would save you around £3 a year. It doesn't sound much, but if you do the same for computer/microwave/DVD player/HiFi etc. it can come to quite a lot.

    In our house, the worst offender was the microwave, which used 42 Watts when not doing *anything* except displaying the time. So thats £30-£40 or so saved a year for us, as it's only switched on during meal times for preperation

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  • Dave
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    I had a leaflet from my electricity supplier and it says that on stand by it uses just as much electric as it does being on.The biggest electricity user is a fridge freezer,i must admit i was surprised by this.

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  • Chris
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    Not worth the bother, Tried it once and had to re tune the channels and it's the same with the DVD recorder time date etc

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    One third that it uses when its on. If left in stand by for a year it would cost you an average of £30, extra on your bill.

    Source(s): Dragons Den
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  • 1 decade ago

    About 10% (8W compared to 70W+ for a 20" crt TV)

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  • 1 decade ago

    Varies according to the model. Some are far better than others but good pratice to turn off altogether if you can.

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  • 1 decade ago

    It uses just about the same, so they say on the tv advert

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Not Enough! F*ck Global Warming!

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