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Anonymous asked in Education & ReferenceWords & Wordplay · 1 decade ago

Origin of the word "woman" - "woe of man"?

I've been taught that the origin of the word "woman" was "woe of man" - is this true? Is this false? Or is it one of several possible origins? If that is a myth, where did it come from? And where does the word "woman" really come from?

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favourite answer

    Actually Adam was walking through the world naming things and then he saw eve and was like "whoa man" and God was like i guess we'll go with that

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  • 4 years ago

    Origin Of The Word Woman

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  • 4 years ago

    Tonight I'm Loving You- Enrique Iglesias Give Me Everything Tonight- Pitbull FT. NeYo Hollywood Tonight- Michael Jackson

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    No.

    It comes from Old English "wifman" meaning female human. Hence the word "wife" also. (In French, where "femme" means both woman and wife, in German, where "Frau" stands for both, in Dutch where it's "vrouw" and in many other languages, there is still not the distinction between a female and a wife).

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  • 1 decade ago

    I can't believe you've been taught that. RUN very quickly away from whoever said that. The "wo" in woman comes from womb. The very basic idea is that woman is a "womb-man."

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Very amusing.

    wom·an(wmn)

    n. pl. wom·en (wmn)

    1. An adult female human.

    2. Women considered as a group; womankind: "Woman feels the invidious distinctions of sex exactly as the black man does those of color" Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

    3. An adult female human belonging to a specified occupation, group, nationality, or other category. Often used in combination: an Englishwoman; congresswoman; a saleswoman.

    4. Feminine quality or aspect; womanliness.

    5. A female servant or subordinate.

    6. Informal

    a. A wife.

    b. A female lover or sweetheart. See Usage Notes at lady, man, person.

    Idioms:

    (one's) own woman

    Independent in judgment or action: She has always been her own woman.

    to a woman

    Without exception.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    [Middle English, from Old English wimman, variant of wfman : wf, woman; see ghwbh- in Indo-European roots + man, person; see man.]

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    woe of man just sounds like woman so somebody somewhere along the line (obviously a man) has made it up, just another stupid thing. dont worry about it

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  • 1 decade ago

    This is not the hebrew meaning.

    "And Adam said This is now my bone of my bones, and flesh of my flesh; she shall be called woman. (it is imortant that the hebrew here is 'ishshah

    1 woman , wife, female

    a) woman (opposite of man)

    b) wife (woman to be married to man)

    Not a bringer of woe. In fact woman is the reason that a man should leave his mother and father and cleave unto his wife; and they should be one flesh.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    that sounds harsh but to many woman is the wo of man but i think it was because back then the woman held the dowry of their family

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  • Maria
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    Did some guy tell you that???

    It's from the Old English "wif-man" meaning "female human."

    Nothing mysterious or derogatory.

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