Can your DNA change ?

If for instance you had a bone marrow transplant would your DNA alter to the new marrow? Or would your existing DNA alter the donation ?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    Your DNA can change, but not in the way that i think you mean... DNA is frequently changing as errors can occur in DNA replication which leads to mutations, which are slight alterations in your DNA sequence. Most of the time these will have little effect on your body as a whole. Having a bone marrow transplant would not change your DNA set as a whole. The bone marrow is concerned with the production of blood cells so basically the DNA in bone marrow is just telling it to do this. The bone marrow is still under the control of your bodily processes. Most people are not made of 100% their "own" DNA anyway. Viruses live by encorporating themselves into their host (ie you) genome, and using their resources to make their own DNA. Think about the amount of viruses you will pick up in a lifetime...

    Source(s): med student
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  • 1 decade ago

    the DNA would not change at all from a transplant. the body part that is being transplanted is (at first) recognised as a foreign body by the immune system and will attack it, but medicine managed to overcome this problem. the bone marrow would only provide stem cells. stem cells will (by an unkown reason) change to any cell that is needed in the body, so DNA comes from the cell (that is needed) and not the bone marrow or the stem cell.

    however DNA does change due to different factors. this is called mutation.

    the whole sequence would not change but a section will. if a section of DNA was replaced, then it substitution. if it was removed, then it is elimination, the DNA section can be inverted and a section can be added. these are the effects of mutation. mutation has many factors, one major factor is radioactivity.

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  • 1 decade ago

    What happens after a bone marrow transplant is a fraction of your bone marrow cells will have the donor's DNA, and a fraction will have yours.

    This is what we call a "mixed chimaera".

    The rest of your body will be "yours", od course, although studies carried out in Europe in the 80's and 90's showed some tissues that are created by the bone marrow (some cells of the hair and skin...) will also have the donor's DNA

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  • 1 decade ago

    No, your DNA is fixed at the moment of conception (as are all inheritable characteristics) when the DNA that you get from your mother (from her ovum) unites with the DNA that you get from your father (from his spermatozoon). However, exposure to strong ionising radiation may cause deleterious mutations to occur and the natural processes associated with ageing also seem to predispose one to things like cancer, but this is due to cellular degeneration (things going wrong) and not to a spontaneous changing of your DNA.

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    More specifically, in answer to your sub-question, again the answer is no: a bone marrow transplant would neither alter your or the donor's DNA. However, it would probably trigger an immune response from your body once your body's defences recognise the new marrow as being of foreign origin.

    • Jeff F6 years agoReport

      How about answering questions you actually know. Your blood type we'll change along with the DNA to the donors just like a liver transplant doesn't change the liver's DNA to the recepient

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  • 1 decade ago

    No it cant, the bone marrow would retain the dna of the donor and the rest of your body would remain the same. Bone marrow produces white blood cells so they would have the same dna as the donor too.

    Cancer is caused by damage to dna when cells replicate.

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  • 1 decade ago

    No, you see what happens is, if you have a bone marrow transplant, you will have two different dna's. One of which was your origional one and the other one is the one from the bone marrow!

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  • 1 decade ago

    Yes, it is possible because of a mutation which starts to change the way that the works and acts with in the cell. The DNA from a transplant would not change because it still works with the same functions.

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  • 1 decade ago

    DNA can change, that's the definition of cancer. For a transplant, the marrows will keep their DNA, and donor marrow will have a hard time intermingling with the existing marrow, that's what donor drugs are for (to prevent rejection).

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  • no i dont think so the only way i think you can have a dna change is when you have cancer. the cancer changes the dna so instead of reproducing regular cells it will produce cancer cells. your dna will not change the new marrow but instead fuse with it. the marrow must be a exact copy of the old marrow. if it is not the same it will produce clots in the blood system

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    you'd still have the same dna as a bone marrow transplant doesnt take up all your body does it!but did you know identical twins also have insentical dna,sorry but read it in a magazine as a girl slept with 2 indentical twins and fell pregnant and she tried getting dna tests done but they cant tell who the father is lol!!!!!

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