How do you convert Newtons to Joules please?

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I probably should know this but I don't! So I'm asking for the simplest conversion mehod possible, preferable at A level standard or below. Thankyou! A slightly harassed ...show more
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newton is the unit for force
joules is the unit for work done
by definition, work done = force X distance
so multiply newton by metre to get joules

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4 out of 5
Thanks, speedy answer! Thats what I was looking for :D
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Other Answers (6)

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  • ableego answered 7 years ago
    1 newton = 1 joule/meter

    Use this online converter:

    Source(s):

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  • xyz answered 7 years ago
    A trick to remember is to consider what you are left with at the end of your problem.

    IE: If you are looking for work done, what does the formula W=fd contains,

    It contains a force or f expressed in kg*m/s^2(if you are left with kg*m/s^2 you are left with a newton)

    multiplied by a distance (d) in meters (if you are left with m you are left with a distance in meters)

    So if you are left with kg*m^2/s^2 you are left with joules.
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  • madnira answered 7 years ago
    If 1 joule of force acts on one meter distance, its one newton.please check this
    http://www.unitconversion.org/force/newtons-to-joules-per-meter-conversion.html
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  • vale l answered 7 years ago
    newtons arent for the same thing as joules.newtons are for force, joules are for work done, so you can't do a conversion.
    anyway joules=newtons/meters
    1joule*1meter=1newton

    kisses
    p.s:if you need help on physics, email me!!;)
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  • epidavros answered 7 years ago
    You cannot convert Newtons to Joules - they measure different things. If you do not understand this you are WAY below A level standard.

    Newtons are units of force.

    Joules are units of energy.

    Clearly, a force can do work and so can be related to energy. But so can many other things. This does not imply a conversion.
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  • Lirrain answered 7 years ago
    Aren't you a little young to remember Juice Newton? Oh, wait...
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