Lee
Lv 4
Lee asked in Politics & GovernmentMilitary · 1 decade ago

What is the turning circle of a big aircraft carrier?

Say for instance the USS Nimitz (CVN 68). I've looked on wikipedia but can't find any reference to it.

14 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Best answer

    Classified information....that's why you aren't finding it. If you want to know, go talk to a Navy Recruiter about enlisting.

  • 1 decade ago

    The turning circle in a turning basin using tugs is defined as 1.2L where L is the design length of the ship. It gets larger if there is slight current. The USS Yorktown from WW2 had a turning circle of 1000yds. The modern stuff like the Nimitz class seem to keep the stats under wraps but do have what is called a tactical diameter, i.e how fast it can turn and still keep the aircraft on deck from falling into the sea or maintain flight operations. The jury is out as to whether the Nimitz class has side thrusters or multiple independent rear propellors in which case the turning in around twice it's own length would be practical. http://forums.howwhatwhy.com/showdynamic.php?Cat=&...

    shows a great picture of a carrier "on the ragged edge" during a turn.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Having served aboard H.M.S. ARK ROYAL (R09) not the little thing they have now. It all depends on how many knots the ship is doing at the time of the turn. It can not turn on a sixpence.

    So in maneuvering a ship, there is a lot of inertia and momentum to be dealt with. For example, a loaded super tanker, which can weigh well over 250,000 long tons, may travel several miles in the original direction of motion before stabilizing on a new course or speed.

    Navy Sailor, since when has it been classified information about a ships turning distance? Don`t make me laugh lol.

    Source(s): Myself
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Depends on speed. The Nimitz has most likely sideway propellers, or maybe her propellers can be turned. At zero speed, a sophisticated ship should be albe to turn on the spot. But because everything is so powerful on a huge ship, they would certainly use tug boats in any confined space. Going full speed, a huge ship could need a quarter mile radius to turn, there would be lots of foam in the water and the rudders would have to take a big strain. Most unlike they would do that.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Can't tell you, it's classified. However, I can tell you that the Nimitz class do NOT have bow thrusters (or sideways propellers as I've seen them called here). Suffice it to say that it would be determined by sea state and the ships speed, among other things.

    Source(s): Father served in USS Intrepid, USS America, USS John F Kennedy, USS Independence, and USS Eisenhower
  • R4L
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    An aircraft carrier avoids having to do that. Its main arms are planes, so they don't need to be able to turn very fast. However, if it had to, I would say miles.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    If it had bow thrusters, it could turn in its own length.

    Mine hunters can do this too, using Voith Schneider propulsion units. Its like an egg whish/helicopter collective system. They can travel in any direction (not not terribly fast).

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    miles and miles.... it could turn on a sixpence... but it would capsize...

    a 90 degree course change will take anything upto five miles... the faster the boat is travelling the longer it takes, and the wider the arc.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I think it can turn on one spot, it probably has propellas on the side like hellicopters.

  • mar m
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    Miles. I would say two miles.

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