Crossing Knife and fork?

The phrase 'he crosses his knife and fork ' I know it is bad table manner but ,what does it mean?

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    The oldest idea I know of is that crossing kinfe and fork is to invite crosses, in the sense of bad luck, death, and crosses in cemetaries.

    As far as table manners, when at a formal eating event or better resturant in many countries, to place the untensil on the plate, or in the bowl signals one has finished the course.

    Servants know to take all away. Importantly, called silent dining, the silverware won't clatter when placed (not touching) on the plate or in the bowl.

    --That Cheeky Lad

  • 1 decade ago

    It is not bad table manners it is an old wives tale. You can see some of the supposed meanings in the other answers. The only table manners associated with knives and forks are that you place them, together, side by side, in the centre of your plate to signify you have finished eating. The waiter then knows that he can clear your setting and serve the next course. It is in doing this that you can inadvertently cross you knife and fork, leading to the old wives tales.

  • Travelling thorugh Europe it generally means that you are not finished with your meal. Most Europeans, particularly in the East stop halfway through a meal to have a cigarette and then continue afterwards. Knife and fork side by side ends your meal but the host or waitron will still ask if you are done.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Simple in the uk, when you put your knife and fork down when you have finished eating it should be done so that they are side by side, to just put them down and they are crossed shows you as a slob or under educated. Plus it is supposed to be unlucky because it represents the cross of Jesus.

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  • 1 decade ago

    When you lay your cutlery down in such a way that one is laying on top of the other but not parallel to it we say that the knife and fork are crossed.

  • 1 decade ago

    it means if you cross a knife and fork, there is going to be a fight.hope not,lol

  • 1 decade ago

    I didn't know about the etiquette side of things, but my nan told me it was bad luck

    So I never cross mine x

  • 1 decade ago

    It means the person isn't finished with his meal, I'm very superstitious and hate to see that as it means an argument is due.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Not socially educated. A slob. A lower class person.

  • 1 decade ago

    In my youth the saying was a visitors coming, it seemed to be true.

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