MATHS can any 1 help me with ohms law?

ive just started my college coarse and i need to learn ohms law, does any body no a site o anywere i can learn ohms law from sratch cause i havnt a clue what its about. PLEASE HELP!!!!!!!!!!

Update:

well thank you for the help so far but i have look on sites but i was hoping for sumone to help me abit more with a site they no.

13 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Hi:

    Ohm laws is the following: Voltage ( E) = I (current in amps) * Resistance ( R in ohms)

    or V = I * R

    For a example: a Light bulb in a searchlight has 100 ohms resistance and 10 amps of current flows through it. What is the voltage?

    answer:

    V = 10 *100 = 1,000 volts

    Resistance(R) = V (Voltage) / Current (I)

    or R = V / I

    For example:

    A toaster wire has 120 volts applied to it and the amp meter says 10 amps of current is flowing what is the resistance of the wire?

    Answer:

    Resistance ( R) = Voltage (E) / Current ( I )

    R = E / I

    R= 120 / 10 = 12 ohms

    Current ( I ) = Voltage (V) / Resistance ( R)

    I = E / R

    for example

    On a Motherboard of a computer, a resistor has a value or 1,000 ohms and a voltage meter is connected to the resistor and it reads 15 volts. What is the current flowing thru the resistor?

    Answer :

    I ( Current ) = E (Voltage) / Resistance ( R)

    I = E / R

    I = 15 / 1000

    I = .015 Amps

    You should get some good books on Electronics, Electrical Engineering or Physics. It explain everything you want to know about Ohms Law and Electricity

    Hope this helps

    Source(s): Any book on Electronics, Electricity, and Electrical Engineering.
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  • Huge
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    The easiest way of learning Ohms Law is to remember the picture of a triangle with or the formulae inside; with this you need no more. Draw a triangle and put the letters in that represent Voltage, Current and Power. V for Volts, I for Current (Amps) and R (Resistance) in Ohms. (ie. V=IR). You can use the same method to remember the formulae to calculate electrical power.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Ohms Law.

    Wheel Example

    The unit of resistance is called Ohm in honor of a German scientice by the name of Georg Simon Ohm, who discovered that when a conductor has a resistance of 1 ohm than an emf of 1 volt will cause a current of 1 amp to flow through a conductor.

    Ohms Law. I = E/R or R = E/I or E = IR.

    DC. or Direct Current is one that the current always flows in one direction.

    The letter for Current is I and is expressed in amperes.

    The letter for voltage is E and is expressed in volts.

    The letter for resistance is R and is expressed in ohms.

    The letters for power or wattage are P and W and are expressed power and watts.

    The formulas for ohms law are.

    If you know R the resistance and E the voltage the formula for finding I current is I = E/R.

    If you know E the voltage and I the current the formular for R resistance is R =E/I.

    If you know I the current and R the resistance the formula for E voltage is E = IR.

    If you know I the current and E the voltage the formula for P power or W watts is P =EI.

    If you know W watts and I current the formula for E voltage is E = P/I.

    If you know W Watts and E voltage the formula for I current is I = P/E.

    Example<>If you have a 1200 watt or 1.2 KVA electrical device and the voltage is 120 volts, the amperage rating for this device is approximately 10 amps. I amperage = P or watts divided by E voltage. The K in KVA stands for 1,000.

    AC. or Alternating Current is one that the current periodically changes directions.

    The formulas for AC current involve impedance, effective value and Power Factor. But for home devices such as lights and appliances, there would not be much of a change when using the Ohms Law formulas above.

    The unit of resistance is called Ohm in honor of a German scientice by the name of Georg Simon Ohm, who discovered that when a conductor has a resistance of 1 ohm than an emf of 1 volt will cause a current of 1 amp to flow through a conductor.

    Ohms Law. I = E/R or R = E/I or E = IR.

    DC. or Direct Current is one that the current always flows in one direction.

    The letter for Current is I and is expressed in amperes.

    The letter for voltage is E and is expressed in volts.

    The letter for resistance is R and is expressed in ohms.

    The letters for power or wattage are P and W and are expressed power and watts.

    The formulas for ohms law are.

    If you know R the resistance and E the voltage the formula for finding I current is I = E/R.

    If you know E the voltage and I the current the formular for R resistance is R =E/I.

    If you know I the current and R the resistance the formula for E voltage is E = IR.

    If you know I the current and E the voltage the formula for P power or W watts is P =EI.

    If you know W watts and I current the formula for E voltage is E = P/I.

    If you know W Watts and E voltage the formula for I current is I = P/E.

    Example<>If you have a 1200 watt or 1.2 KVA electrical device and the voltage is 120 volts, the amperage rating for this device is approximately 10 amps. I amperage = P or watts divided by E voltage. The K in KVA stands for 1,000.

    AC. or Alternating Current is one that the current periodically changes directions.

    The formulas for AC current involve impedance, effective value and Power Factor. But for home devices such as lights and appliances, there would not be much of a change when using the Ohms Law formulas above.

    I also suggest a simple course in spelling.

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  • flori
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    actually Ohm's law comes under physics but you can get numericals based on ohm's law.

    according to Ohms law, current(I) flowing through a conductor(having resistance R) is directly proportional to potential difference applied across the conductor.

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  • Kes
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    Students (engineering?) often find the Ohm's Law Circle helpful in remembering the calculations that can be made. Good luck.

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  • Roy S
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    They really are making a mountain out of a molehill!

    The voltage across a resistance divided by the current flowing through it in amperes gives its resistance in OHMS.

    V/I=R if you must have a formula.

    RoyS

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  • 1 decade ago

    To remember the actual equation, i remembered it in the form;

    Voltage = Current x Resistance (V = C x R).

    So u can remember VCR, like the old type recorders...

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    start with wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ohm%27s_law

    ohm's law relates voltage V, current I, and resistance R.

    It is put together as follows:

    V α I (i.e. more current, more voltage, direct relationship)

    V α R (more resistance, more voltage, direct relationship)

    put it together:

    V= k*I*R ; now the units of V I and R are chosen so that k is "1"

    so we get

    V=IR

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  • 1 decade ago

    I = E/R

    current = voltage/resistance

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Just plug into your browser. What's the prob ??

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