• Teachers; 13yo on IEP still fails classes?

    He’s on an IEP for ASD, adhd & anxiety. I’m emailing his teachers weekly to be sure he’s on track. Not all of the teachers respond so I never know how things are going. Then we get report cards and I see he’s failed a class. Isn’t the point of an IEP is to prevent that from happening? The school thinks I’m... show more
    He’s on an IEP for ASD, adhd & anxiety. I’m emailing his teachers weekly to be sure he’s on track. Not all of the teachers respond so I never know how things are going. Then we get report cards and I see he’s failed a class. Isn’t the point of an IEP is to prevent that from happening? The school thinks I’m being ridiculous
    9 answers · 6 days ago
  • Are there any options for special needs students capable of grade level work if the school won't let them in mainstream classes? Outside of?

    Tutoring after school for enrichment?
    Tutoring after school for enrichment?
    4 answers · 5 days ago
  • I took an iq test from my psychiatrist. they told me i dont have learning disabilities. what is the issue i have called?

    https://mail.yahoo.com/d/folders/2/messa... thats a link to the assement conducted by my psychiatrist.
    https://mail.yahoo.com/d/folders/2/messa... thats a link to the assement conducted by my psychiatrist.
    7 answers · 1 week ago
  • Why do parents get so upset when their autistic kids forget to say “thank you” or use other manners?

    It’s 2018 and even with all the awareness of autism, autistic kids are still screamed at and punished for forgetting to say just a couple of words. It is very hard for people with autism to learn and remember these things. Please just let them get away with it. If someone doesn’t say thank you, just think they’re... show more
    It’s 2018 and even with all the awareness of autism, autistic kids are still screamed at and punished for forgetting to say just a couple of words. It is very hard for people with autism to learn and remember these things. Please just let them get away with it. If someone doesn’t say thank you, just think they’re autistic
    6 answers · 1 week ago
  • What do low functioning autistic teens do after graduating high school?

    I'm a bit concerned. I don't think my friends parents are going to put my friends brother through continued education until he's 21. he just graduated this month, age 18, and I don't think he's doing anything other than staying home and going on youtube. He can't live on his own or do much... show more
    I'm a bit concerned. I don't think my friends parents are going to put my friends brother through continued education until he's 21. he just graduated this month, age 18, and I don't think he's doing anything other than staying home and going on youtube. He can't live on his own or do much of anything for himself. What will become of this?? Please no rude answers as I am only concerned...
    8 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • My Child has Learning Disability and Autism, does he have to go to summer school?

    My child is 15 and goes to a public high school in New York state. He is almost failing all classes. He has a bad learning disability where he comprehends as a 5th grader, and he is in 10th grade. He also just been diagnosed with autism. Would he have to go summer school if he failed his regents, or it is illegal... show more
    My child is 15 and goes to a public high school in New York state. He is almost failing all classes. He has a bad learning disability where he comprehends as a 5th grader, and he is in 10th grade. He also just been diagnosed with autism. Would he have to go summer school if he failed his regents, or it is illegal for them to send him to summer school to retake his tests.
    10 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • What to do about autistic child who wears diapers at night?

    Our son is 7 and autistic. He has recently outgrown diapers during the day, but still wears them at night. The doctor says he will likely be out of them by age 10 or 11. I change him every morning, but my husband thinks we should teach him to change his own diapers. Husband thinks that it's not appropriate... show more
    Our son is 7 and autistic. He has recently outgrown diapers during the day, but still wears them at night. The doctor says he will likely be out of them by age 10 or 11. I change him every morning, but my husband thinks we should teach him to change his own diapers. Husband thinks that it's not appropriate at his age for me to be changing him. My opinion: - It's very difficult to change one's own diapers, especially for an autistic child. He's likely to make a mess, or not do a good enough job wiping himself. - It's not a skill he will need once he outgrows this. - It's MUCH easier for him. Changing one's own diapers is very difficult, esp for an autistic child. If I do it, all he has to do is lie down and let me do the work. - If I change him, I can use baby wipes. They do a better job cleaning than toilet paper. (And "flushable" wipes really aren't flushable) If he weren't autistic, this would be a very different situation, and then again he would have been potty trained years ago. Am I being reasonable? Or is my husband right?
    6 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • What kinds of sheltered workshop jobs are appropriate for someone who is non verbal?

    I have a student who will most likely be apart of a sheltered workshop. She is non verbal, hates loud noises and crowds, and has limited motor skills. What types of sheltered workshop jobs would be good for her?
    I have a student who will most likely be apart of a sheltered workshop. She is non verbal, hates loud noises and crowds, and has limited motor skills. What types of sheltered workshop jobs would be good for her?
    6 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • Can somebody who’s mentally challenged really can get better in life?

    Because- I’ve meet someone online, and she was once on a severe level, and she became very mild functioning after what she told me.
    Because- I’ve meet someone online, and she was once on a severe level, and she became very mild functioning after what she told me.
    5 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • Does being born with Aspergers mean I was born with a mental disability?

    Best answer: I have Asperger's and my opinion is that it is definitely a social disability, but can also be a useful intellectual asset. As I'm sure you understand, people with Asperger's can become obsessed with understanding every minute detail of a very limited topic. The trick is to learn to be comfortable... show more
    Best answer: I have Asperger's and my opinion is that it is definitely a social disability, but can also be a useful intellectual asset. As I'm sure you understand, people with Asperger's can become obsessed with understanding every minute detail of a very limited topic. The trick is to learn to be comfortable with who you really are and to use your obsession with details to your advantage.

    The first step is to accept that you are never going to be particularly popular, because you lack the social instincts that regular folks use to emotionally connect with each other. The chances are that you will have fewer friends because you don't enjoy participation in group activities or understand how to interpret other people's emotional states. It's likely you will have difficulty controlling your own emotions and may be prone to temperamental outbursts. It's not as grim as it sounds, because the older you get, the less you will care about being popular with others and the more comfortable you will become with being alone with yourself.

    On the other hand, you can learn to use your tendency to obsess with details and habitual repetition to your advantage. You can use Asperger's as a powerful study aid and focus down on the essential principles of even the most complicated topics -- assuming you can find a quiet distraction-free place to study. If you're like me, you will be able to learn most things by yourself because you will obsess with the incomprehensible details until you truly do understand.

    As an Aspie, you won't excel at the social games most people play but, if you take advantage of the alone-time your social handicap creates, you can become a powerful autodidact and master virtually any technical subject you put your mind to. The trick is to not use your social disabilities an an excuse for failure and to, instead, turn your tendency to obsess about details into a practical study-aid and powerful intellectual advantage. If you're like me, you'll care about understanding how and why things work the way they do and may have a real talent for math, science, and engineering.
    5 answers · 1 month ago