• Did you know that Chinese Mandarin is more unintelligible and abstruse than we think......?

    Best answer: And the US had the Navajo Code Talkers during WWII for the same purpose
    Best answer: And the US had the Navajo Code Talkers during WWII for the same purpose
    16 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Can any German speakers explain this word order of this sentence to me?

    the sentence is"Ich möchte jetzt nicht essen. ich werde später essen", which translates to "I do not want to eat now. I will eat later" according to google translate. I don't fully trust google translate, but I haven't learned enough about know whether it's right or wrong. If I... show more
    the sentence is"Ich möchte jetzt nicht essen. ich werde später essen", which translates to "I do not want to eat now. I will eat later" according to google translate. I don't fully trust google translate, but I haven't learned enough about know whether it's right or wrong. If I translate it word for word it would say: "I want now not eat. I will later eat." This obviously doesn't make sense to me as a native english speaker. can somone explain to me the verb placements?
    13 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Is there a French word that equates to saying "nonsense"?

    Best answer: For a non vulgar one, "n'importe quoi" works. It literally means "anything" (more literally "doesn't matter what") but can also be used to mean "nonsense". In the same way, "n'importe qui", which literally means "anybody" (more literally... show more
    Best answer: For a non vulgar one, "n'importe quoi" works. It literally means "anything" (more literally "doesn't matter what") but can also be used to mean "nonsense".
    In the same way, "n'importe qui", which literally means "anybody" (more literally "doesn't matter who") can be used to mean "someone nobody cares about".
    "N'importe quoi" has a verlan version, "nawak", which only has the "nonsense" meaning and not the "anything" one. It's verlan, though, so it's colloquial, although I wouldn't say it's vulgar.

    You asked for "bullshit", which is vulgar. In this case, the word "connerie" means the same thing with more or less the same level of vulgarity. Literally, it means "stupidness" (more literally, "cuntness", although it's way less vulgar as how "c*nt" is used in English) and is more generally used to describe words or actions that are nonsensical or stupid.
    It's often used in the plural, so "This is bullshit" will correspond to "C'est des conneries".

    And finally, you have "bêtise". It also means literally "stupidness" (more litterally "beastness") and is mild enough that it's the version used by children. It's used the same way as "connerie" so it's often in the plural and "This is nonsense" corresponds to "C'est des bêtises".

    In a more academic way, the word "absurdité" also means the same thing as "nonsense". It's standard so you don't really have to be careful about when to use it, however, people will generally prefer using more colloquial words in everyday speech. "This is nonsense" would correspond either to "C'est asburde" (This doesn't make sense) or "Ce sont des absurdités" (This is nonsense).
    6 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Why do people find I strange when I hate it when they speak a language I don’t understand?

    Best answer: Maybe it's because of your reaction is excessive?

    I think ' hate ' is overreacting. Dislike is more appropriated in this type of situation. Personally I find it frustrating, when people do that. But no hate anyway.
    Best answer: Maybe it's because of your reaction is excessive?

    I think ' hate ' is overreacting. Dislike is more appropriated in this type of situation. Personally I find it frustrating, when people do that. But no hate anyway.
    19 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • What does "European war" mean in this sentence?

    Best answer: It means a war in Europe.
    Best answer: It means a war in Europe.
    7 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • How do you say 300 in Spanish?

    9 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • How many hours does it take to learn a language?

    if i'm currently at a B1 level (Pretty good intermediate) how many hours will it take me to reach basic/ pretty fair amount of fluency if i'm putting in around 20+ Hours a week?
    if i'm currently at a B1 level (Pretty good intermediate) how many hours will it take me to reach basic/ pretty fair amount of fluency if i'm putting in around 20+ Hours a week?
    11 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Can somebody please check if my English is easy to understand?

    Can somebody please check if my English is easy to understand?

    I'd like to start my own blog in English language but feeling not sure about my language Example of my writing is on a picture
    I'd like to start my own blog in English language but feeling not sure about my language Example of my writing is on a picture
    8 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • How come china has NO alpahbet ? can you read classical -chinese ? yes or no ?
  • Is Portuguese the worst language in the world?

    Best answer: No.

    There is no such thing. No objective way to make such an evaluation. A person's subjective opinion means nothing.
    Best answer: No.

    There is no such thing. No objective way to make such an evaluation. A person's subjective opinion means nothing.
    8 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • What does "the determination of Britain and France" mean in this sentence ?

    Best answer: "Determination" can mean simply to make a decision or a finding of fact (like to make a "determination" if a chick is a male or a female), but it can ALSO refer to a commitment to a decided course of action (like "to be determined" to gain the top marks in class, or in noun-form, to... show more
    Best answer: "Determination" can mean simply to make a decision or a finding of fact (like to make a "determination" if a chick is a male or a female), but it can ALSO refer to a commitment to a decided course of action (like "to be determined" to gain the top marks in class, or in noun-form, to "have the determination" to gain the top marks in class).

    In this case, Hitler had been abetted by military unpreparedness in both Britain and France, plus their leaders' sense that the people of both countries would prefer almost anything to second war in twenty years. When Hitler subsequently embarrassed the peace-parties of both countries by violating their agreement, the parties that favored war in both countries gained the upper hand, so that Hitler's next move was greeted with strong resolve (or "determination") to resist him militarily.
    6 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Should I first learn Frech or Arabic?

    Best answer: Whichever you think will be the most useful in your life.
    Best answer: Whichever you think will be the most useful in your life.
    10 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Does anyone remember growing up in the 70s and hearing the insult "Spaz'?

    Best answer: In the 1960s, when people with cerebral palsy were called spastics, the word - usually abbreviated to spaz - was used as a mild insult. As the word spastic was phased out of the English language by political correctness (The Spastics Society is now called Care), the insult lost its edge and children had to come up... show more
    Best answer: In the 1960s, when people with cerebral palsy were called spastics, the word - usually abbreviated to spaz - was used as a mild insult. As the word spastic was phased out of the English language by political correctness (The Spastics Society is now called Care), the insult lost its edge and children had to come up with other words to insult each other.
    8 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Do you recommend learning a few phrases in French when visiting Paris?

    I’m learning the general questions and answers, but didn’t know if there were other specific phrases suggested to learn as well. Thanks.
    I’m learning the general questions and answers, but didn’t know if there were other specific phrases suggested to learn as well. Thanks.
    13 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • What does "the Munich agreement" mean in this sentences?

    Best answer: It means that the idea that Hitler violated anything about the Munich Agreement was a fabrication to justify provoking Germany into a war. Britain actually supported the Munich Agreement until Roosevelt forced them to reverse their support under threats of complete withdrawal of military and financial... show more
    Best answer: It means that the idea that Hitler violated anything about the Munich Agreement was a fabrication to justify provoking Germany into a war. Britain actually supported the Munich Agreement until Roosevelt forced them to reverse their support under threats of complete withdrawal of military and financial support.

    Claims of violating the Munich Agreement seem to overlook a couple of details that contradict the concept of wrongdoing.

    One has to do with a similar conflict between Poland and Czechoslovakia over the Zaolzie region where ethnic Poles had been absorbed into Czechoslovakia by the Treaty of Versailles and demanded to be reunited with Poland, just as the ethnic Germans were in Czechoslovakia and Poland by the Treaty of Versailles. The West supported Poland but condemned Germany for the same thing.

    Another aspect to point out was that Czechoslovakia became a protectorate of Germany. Maybe a lot of people don't know what "protectorate" means - it means being under the protection of a larger, more powerful country. There's a big difference between "protectorate" and "occupation" and the word "protectorate" is being used for a reason. With Czechoslovakia being under the protection of Germany, the big question is "from whom?"

    The answer to this comes to light when it becomes known that while Germany and Czechoslovakia were squaring off over the Sudetenland issue, Poland and Hungary were busy helping themselves to parts of Czechoslovakia on their own - with Poland getting Zaolzie as noted above.

    Threats on Czechoslovakia's back door would have been one good reason to need "protected". The occupation of Czechoslovakia by Germany was never a territorial grab - the only area that went to Germany was the limited area of the Sudetenland.

    So, in summary, we have a case here where a "protectorate" status between Germany and Czechoslovakia is recognized and supported by mainstream history. And we learn that the "protectorate" status was established because Poland and Hungary were knocking on Czechslovakia's back door.

    But we have this threat swept under the rug by mainstream history because it detracts from vilifying Germany's actions. Britain originally supported the Munich Agreement until Roosevelt threatened them into reversing their support and instead, setting Poland up to provoke Germany into a fight, through which Britain could justify declaring war on Germany.
    7 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • What does "Exactly which" mean in this sentence ?

    Best answer: Simply omit "exactly" to make sense. And note that the verb should be plural, thus: "..program ARE not set pieces"

    In fact I would write "are not fixed". The expression "set piece" is not correct in that context.
    Best answer: Simply omit "exactly" to make sense. And note that the verb should be plural, thus: "..program ARE not set pieces"

    In fact I would write "are not fixed". The expression "set piece" is not correct in that context.
    6 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • What does "Hitler’s violation of the Munich agreement over Czechoslovakia" mean in this sentence?

    Best answer: Hitler agreed to enter only a limited part of western Czechoslovakia (the Sudetenland) where the was a large population of German ancestry. A few months later he broke the agreement by occupying the whole of Czechoslovakia.

    Violation means a going against an agreement.
    Best answer: Hitler agreed to enter only a limited part of western Czechoslovakia (the Sudetenland) where the was a large population of German ancestry. A few months later he broke the agreement by occupying the whole of Czechoslovakia.

    Violation means a going against an agreement.
    6 answers · 2 weeks ago