• What is "do you know the way?" in french, german and spanish?

    Best answer: In French, the answer to your question depends on what exactly you mean by "way", what you mean by "you" and also in what context you're saying it. Also, it depends if you are talking formally, neutrally or informally. There are 3 ways to ask questions in French. The inversion questions are... show more
    Best answer: In French, the answer to your question depends on what exactly you mean by "way", what you mean by "you" and also in what context you're saying it. Also, it depends if you are talking formally, neutrally or informally.

    There are 3 ways to ask questions in French. The inversion questions are formal, the "est-ce que questions" are neutral and the intonation questions (bascially an affirmative sentence with a question mark in the end) is informal.

    There are 2 "you" in French. The second person singular "tu" is for when you're talking to one friend, member of your family, person you feel close to, peer (particularly in school), child, animal or god. The second person plural is when you're talking to more than one person, whoever it is, or when you're talking to one person you don't know, someone above you (your boss, the mayor, the president, etc) or someone you want to show some extra respect or distance to.
    Additionally, "you" is often used in English as an impersonal subject when French would actually use "on".

    "Way" in English can mean direction or manner. They are translated into several different things in French depending on the information you want to convey.
    For example for a direction, it could be "direction" for a general orientation, "chemin" for a relatively short path or "route" for a longer path.
    For a manner, it could be translated "façon", "méthode", "mannière" or something else.

    So that makes at least 3*3*6 = 54 possible translations for what you asked. And that's not considering that sometimes, sentences are completely reformulated and do not include any of the words of the original sentence it's translated from.

    I know this is annoying and I'm not doing that to bother your. But I wanted you to understand that whenever you ask for a translation into an other language, particularly from a language as sloppy as English in term of grammar, you need to provide a maximum of context if you want to be sure you get what you are looking for.
    4 answers · 6 hours ago
  • Is zaro a word in any language?

    6 answers · 24 hours ago
  • What was the very first language?

    14 answers · 1 day ago
  • What is it called when humans watch people?

    When animals watch people it is called people watching. But what it called when people do it?
    When animals watch people it is called people watching. But what it called when people do it?
    15 answers · 2 days ago
  • I've been learning French for more than a year and still can't understand spoken French...?

    I can understand written french but I always get lost when I listen to spoken french on television or on the internet. Should I just give up?? Why is this??
    I can understand written french but I always get lost when I listen to spoken french on television or on the internet. Should I just give up?? Why is this??
    13 answers · 2 days ago
  • Does this sound natural in English?

    Best answer: Yes, it's perfectly clear.
    A British speaker would be more likely to write: ... but the lady told me it HAD already BEEN ADOPTED'.
    Best answer: Yes, it's perfectly clear.
    A British speaker would be more likely to write: ... but the lady told me it HAD already BEEN ADOPTED'.
    9 answers · 1 day ago
  • Why do native English speakers often confuse words like they're and their?

    Best answer: And don't forget the unforgettable there. Kids who grow up in the English speaking world learn much of their English at home, from their parents or guardians. So by the time they've hit the first grade, they've already learned bad English if their adults are not well educated. And even when they do... show more
    Best answer: And don't forget the unforgettable there.

    Kids who grow up in the English speaking world learn much of their English at home, from their parents or guardians. So by the time they've hit the first grade, they've already learned bad English if their adults are not well educated.

    And even when they do get to school, it's but for a few hours each day and even less studying English. So when they go home after school they get even more bad English from their parents et al. So yes they speak it every day, but with their peers and adults who are poorly educated. And to a point, speaking English does not differentiate between they're, their, and there as they are homonyms.
    25 answers · 5 days ago
  • Is there any problem about speaking English in Quebec (especially Montreal)?

    Best answer: Montreal is very much an English speaking city, so that won't be a problem. Quebec City is more French for sure, so definitely learn some key phrases- they will appreciate the effort that you put into that type of thing. You will be able to get by though, most people in the tourist industry in Quebec City speak... show more
    Best answer: Montreal is very much an English speaking city, so that won't be a problem. Quebec City is more French for sure, so definitely learn some key phrases- they will appreciate the effort that you put into that type of thing. You will be able to get by though, most people in the tourist industry in Quebec City speak some level of English.Once you are there among people that speak French you'll learn a lot more quickly than any lessons will teach you....and it will only cost you some time!
    6 answers · 7 hours ago
  • What do these symbols mean?

    What do these symbols mean?

    9 answers · 4 days ago
  • Do you say "two number two" or "two number twos" when you order a meal at a fast food restaurant?

    Best answer: "Two number twos, please."
    Best answer: "Two number twos, please."
    12 answers · 3 days ago
  • If I killed myself. here "killed" past or past participle?

    Best answer: It's either the preterit tense (simple past tense) or the past subjunctive mood. Whether it's preterit or past subjunctive depends on what follows and/or the intended meaning. It is in the preterit tense if what you are saying is the past tense of "If I kill myself" (e.g., "If I kill... show more
    Best answer: It's either the preterit tense (simple past tense) or the past subjunctive mood. Whether it's preterit or past subjunctive depends on what follows and/or the intended meaning.

    It is in the preterit tense if what you are saying is the past tense of "If I kill myself" (e.g., "If I kill myself, I will never see my daughter get married."). It is in the past subjunctive mood if it creates an irrealis and what ensues uses the conditional mood (e.g., "If I were to kill myself, I would never see my daughter get married.").

    Basically, you have to decide whether it explains a past situation followed by a CONSEQUENCE that would also have happened IN THE PAST or it raises a hypothetical whose CONSEQUENCE would happen IN THE FUTURE if that hypothetical were to occur. If "in the past," then it is preterit, but if "in the future," then it is past subjunctive. To form an irrealis in the past whose consequence is also in the past, one must use the pluperfect subjunctive mood (e.g., "If I had killed myself, I would never have seen my daughter get married.").
    8 answers · 2 days ago
  • When people are devastated by a disaster or something, why do english people say to them god bless you?

    they aren t blessed by god. thats why they are devastated, don t they?
    they aren t blessed by god. thats why they are devastated, don t they?
    8 answers · 2 days ago
  • Does this sound natural in English?

    Best answer: You could say "with the US plan" or "in the US." But to say "with the US" is not standard English.
    Best answer: You could say "with the US plan" or "in the US." But to say "with the US" is not standard English.
    6 answers · 15 hours ago
  • How do I ask a question?

    6 answers · 24 hours ago
  • Is english a germanic language?

    Best answer: Yes. Its oldest roots are Germanic.
    Of course it has huge input from Latin and Greek too, often via French.
    Best answer: Yes. Its oldest roots are Germanic.
    Of course it has huge input from Latin and Greek too, often via French.
    9 answers · 3 days ago
  • I noticed something interesting at the mall the other day?

    Best answer: The same nationality does nat mean same mother tongues, especiall in South Asia. In some countries, such as Belgium, there may be such hostility between speakers of different official languages that English offers neutrality. Some native languages may lack the sophistication for ease of use in highly specialised... show more
    Best answer: The same nationality does nat mean same mother tongues, especiall in South Asia. In some countries, such as Belgium, there may be such hostility between speakers of different official languages that English offers neutrality. Some native languages may lack the sophistication for ease of use in highly specialised fields (engineering, medicine, business). Many experts in an international field may be forced to use English to foreigners that they get more used to speaking English at work, and of course, English now has the snob appeal that used to be enjoyed by French. the elites in pre-WW1 used French even at home: look at the opening pages of War and Peace.
    7 answers · 2 days ago
  • Why is it so hard to learn Chinese, Japanese and other Eastern languages?

    Best answer: 1. Almost every word is foreign to an English speaker. Unlike languages like French. 2. They are all in different language families from English (and often from each other. The Chinese languages, Japanese, and Korean, the three big Eastern languages, are in separate families. 3. They have very different... show more
    Best answer: 1. Almost every word is foreign to an English speaker. Unlike languages like French.

    2. They are all in different language families from English (and often from each other. The Chinese languages, Japanese, and Korean, the three big Eastern languages, are in separate families.

    3. They have very different grammar and grammatical concepts. Even if the structures are simple (which is not always the case), alien concepts are difficult to truly grasp, for an English speaker learning a first foreign language.

    4. The more languages you learn, the easier the next one becomes, even if it's an Eastern language. Japanese was my fourth foreign language. I had also gotten a degree in teaching French, for which I studied linguistics and phonology as well. Japanese was far less difficult for me than if it had been my first foreign language before my teaching degree.

    5. Chinese and Japanese have very different writing systems, and they are not identical.

    Chinese languages require about 4000 characters for daily literacy (and there are tens of thousands that exist, some say even 100,000 or so, but many of those are rarely used).

    Japanese uses a subset of Chinese characters, about 2100 for daily literacy, but each character usually has at least two pronunciations (and sometimes more), based on the native Japanese word(s) and the Sino-Japanese word(s) that evolved from the original Chinese when the character was borrowed, often 1000 years ago or more. It also uses two syllabic scripts as well (together adding about 100 more symbols). The three form a single writing system, and all three can appear in even simple sentences. The Japanese system is considered slightly more difficult than the Chinese system, despite having fewer symbols.

    Korean has a its own true alphabet, which is not considered difficult. Vowels have distinct shapes from consonants. Letters often give clues to how they are pronounced. Letters are written syllable blocks, so there's no guessing at where a syllable begins or ends. Korean grammar makes it unnecessary to group letters into words.

    6. Korean, Japanese, the Chinese languages (and Arabic) are all level V languages, per the American Foreign Service Institute. A typical English speaker needs 2200 hours of study to reach competency in those languages (speaking, listening, reading, writing). Even if one element is fairly easy, like the Korean alphabet, other elements are more difficult resulting in the same number of hours needed. Level I languages, on the other hand, only require 600 hours of study (some vocabulary in common, far fewer completely alien ideas).

    7. Chinese languages have tonal systems, where using the wrong tone on a word usually changes the word's meaning.

    8. Japanese dialects have a pitch accent system, a very simplified type of tonal system, but only a few words change meaning (although the wrong tone sounds awful. It's like stressing the wrong syllable in English - harder to comprehend).

    9. Standard Korean has no pitch accent or tones, but some dialects do have pitch accent.

    10. Mandarin words do not change form for any reason, not even verbs. Tense is not expressed (but time can be indicated by time words). It expresses a very different array of verbal aspects, but not on the verb itself. Some find Mandarin grammar very easy in the beginning, but it's deceitful. Many structures with different meanings look very similar and are easy to confuse.

    11. Korean has freer word order and a fairly different word order. Some words do change form, and verbs do express tense.

    12. Japanese, despite being unrelated to Korean, is similar in word order, because they happen to both use the same types of grammar (agglutination and inflection). Japanese verbs do not express tense, but do express a few aspects, but very different from Korean, Mandarin, or English.

    13. Most East Asian languages, despite being unrelated (probably from direct influence on each other), lack words for a/an/the, and either have no true plural forms of nouns or plurals are used far more rarely. They also require counters to be used with numbers. Many also drop either certain types of pronouns or all pronouns when understood from context, and most also have a topic-comment structure, which is different from the subject-verb structure English usually uses.

    Japanese and Korean also have politeness levels as well as honorific levels of speech (expressing social relationships among speaker, listener, and those discussed). Japanese men and women sometimes speak a little differently from each other as well.

    14. Sometimes they think about things very differently. Two examples from Japanese:

    I'm hungry -- translated into Japanese and then back into English as literally as possible becomes:

    stomach-subject-emptied-is (and it can come in a normal or plain politeness level, depending on who you are speaking to and/or if it is a main clause or not).

    I love you -- translated back again, becomes two possible different things:

    fond (where I & you are understood from context) - often translated as I like/love you, and can be used with just about anyone (and cab in normal or plain politeness)

    love-doing-am (i & you are understood), and is sometimes used between lovers. It's rather strong.

    Compare that to French. I'm hungry = I have hunger. I love you = I you love (where the form of you indicates you are speaking to one person in a familiar way, and it's either a direct or indirect object). Most French sentences are closer to English wording, but even these are more familiar than the Japanese versions. And the Japanese versions don't express true tense (but it's to hard to grasp that from this alone).

    15. Summary: because they are very different from English, in almost everything, and from each other.
    12 answers · 4 days ago