• The space-time-bus ride?

    Best answer: the magic school bus
    Best answer: the magic school bus
    8 answers · 1 day ago
  • How far does a cord reach?

    7 answers · 10 hours ago
  • Do you believe there are infinite world of infinite possibilities?

    Best answer: The many worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics - all possiblities occur in an ever expanding decision tree (whether conscious choice or environmental interaction) is one of many possible reality interpretations of quantum mechanics. It is popular because it avoids some of the conceptual difficulties such as... show more
    Best answer: The many worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics - all possiblities occur in an ever expanding decision tree (whether conscious choice or environmental interaction) is one of many possible reality interpretations of quantum mechanics. It is popular because it avoids some of the conceptual difficulties such as wave function collapse, indeterminacy, etc. Howver, there is not a shred of evidence that it occurs even at the quantum level. Any one of the other reality explanations of quantum mechanics may be correct and they do not require ‘many worlds’.

    At a more realistic level, it has always been a thorn in the side of quantum mechanics to explain why the macroscopic world doesn’t show quantum behavior which we KNOW occurs in experiments at the atomic level. Decoherence is the usual explanation. A macroscopic object cannot be insulated from environmental interaction like a sub-atomic particle. This is like tossing two rocks in a pond and seeing clear interference of the two waves vs dumping a million rocks in the pond and seeing something totally different. There also can be internal interactions that results in decoherence of quantum effects. It’s also been proposed that once an object gets to a particular size, gravity will cause decoherence.

    The bottom line is that many worlds is just an idea to explain away some of the problems with our understanding quantum reality. No evidence supports it.
    12 answers · 3 days ago
  • Is Einstein mass increase equation an equation that really represents reality?

    Best answer: Sometimes Einstein made gross exaggerations in order to have formulas that would demonstrate the math.
    Best answer: Sometimes Einstein made gross exaggerations in order to have formulas that would demonstrate the math.
    5 answers · 10 hours ago
  • How fast does water absorb into a material?

    As a towel for example, How fast would you have to put it in and out of water so that the towel does not absorb any of the liquid ?
    As a towel for example, How fast would you have to put it in and out of water so that the towel does not absorb any of the liquid ?
    7 answers · 1 day ago
  • How is electricity and magnetism the same so it is called electromagnetism?

    Best answer: A changing magnetic field produces an electric field.
    A changing electric field produces magnetic field.
    So it was realised that electricity and magnetism as different 'faces' of the same thing - which we call electromagnetism.
    Best answer: A changing magnetic field produces an electric field.
    A changing electric field produces magnetic field.
    So it was realised that electricity and magnetism as different 'faces' of the same thing - which we call electromagnetism.
    7 answers · 3 days ago
  • What is the speed at which light travel?

    11 answers · 4 days ago
  • If you hung out of a car going 100mp/h and managed to land a punch on someone’s temple, how f’ed up would your hand be?

    Best answer: I think that the most likely outcome is that your arm would be ripped clean off. But that depends on the angles.
    If you hit it straight on then your arm would crush. The bone broken into 30 or forty pieces a cm or so long.
    But you wouldn't feel it at all. "No brain no pain".
    Best answer: I think that the most likely outcome is that your arm would be ripped clean off. But that depends on the angles.
    If you hit it straight on then your arm would crush. The bone broken into 30 or forty pieces a cm or so long.
    But you wouldn't feel it at all. "No brain no pain".
    6 answers · 2 days ago
  • What stops the electron from falling into the nucleus?

    Best answer: Probability
    Best answer: Probability
    6 answers · 2 days ago
  • What does matter look like at the sub atomic level?

    Best answer: Depends who you want to believe .. String theorists believe they are open and closed one dimensional strings vibrating in a 10 dimensional space. Quantum field theorists think they are oscillations in underlying fields but treat them as point particles Some quantum ‘realists’ think they are smeared over space,... show more
    Best answer: Depends who you want to believe ..

    String theorists believe they are open and closed one dimensional strings vibrating in a 10 dimensional space.

    Quantum field theorists think they are oscillations in underlying fields but treat them as point particles

    Some quantum ‘realists’ think they are smeared over space, others think they are localized particles whose dynamics are governed by ‘pilot waves’

    A particles spin defines a symmetry for a particle and MAY give us an idea about what a particle looks like if that concept even makes sense. A scalar particle, such as the Higgs boson, appears to perfectly symmetric. A spin 1 particle is symmetric about an axis. A spin 1/2 particle is symmetric under 720 degree rotation (yes, two consecutive 360 degree rotations brings it back to its original state), etc.

    Take your pick. It is likely that the concept ‘looks like’ is meaningless and only a mathematical description makes sense.
    9 answers · 4 days ago
  • If we are sitting on a bench are we really accelerating toward the center of the earth do we really feel the motion?

    Best answer: Yes, in order to stay on the surface of the earth instead of flying off into space, you are constantly being moved in a 24 hour circle. In "sitting still" you are actually folllowing a curved path around the earth's axis. This requires constantly changing direction, which is an acceleration. Can you... show more
    Best answer: Yes, in order to stay on the surface of the earth instead of flying off into space, you are constantly being moved in a 24 hour circle. In "sitting still" you are actually folllowing a curved path around the earth's axis.

    This requires constantly changing direction, which is an acceleration.

    Can you feel it? Well you can feel your weight. You can feel the gravitational pull of the earth. Around 1% of your weight is involved in moving you in that circle. Can you feel that 1% of your weight? Probably not. If I suddenly changed your weight by 1% you probably wouldn't notice it. But it can be measured.
    9 answers · 5 days ago
  • How do photons create a wave pattern based on..?

    Best answer: So, one of the big mysteries of quantum mechanics is the so called wave function collapse also known in a more general sense as ‘state reduction’. From a representational standpoint, a particle is described as a wavefunction. A single particle with multiple possible paths can interfere with itself since there is a... show more
    Best answer: So, one of the big mysteries of quantum mechanics is the so called wave function collapse also known in a more general sense as ‘state reduction’. From a representational standpoint, a particle is described as a wavefunction. A single particle with multiple possible paths can interfere with itself since there is a wave function for each possible path that the particle can take. Unobserved in the double slit experiment, the two wave functions for both slits can interfere with each other. Since the wave function represents a probality density of finding the particle at a particular point, you can get low and high probability areas at the detector due to the interference between the two paths. What happens at the detector is still the ill understood wave function collapse where the probability of finding the particle becomes 100% at the point it is detected.

    In the case of observing which slit the particle takes, if you can in fact detect the path, the wave function for the other slit becomes zero - since you know which slit it goes through the probability must be zero for the other slit. Therefore, you have a single wavefunction that does not interfere with itself. This changes the probabilities at the detector. The same wave function collapse occurs at the detector since you still have a wavefunction, albeit a non-interfering wave function
    4 answers · 3 days ago
  • Can the whole world blow up if the electric fizz of all the buildings malfunction?

    Best answer: No. Faults blow fuses or in extreme cases cause sections of the power grid to just shut down. Never heard of "blackouts" ?? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_major_power_outages Electrical power systems are built to stand overhead cables being struck by lightning, which causes a large overload every... show more
    Best answer: No.
    Faults blow fuses or in extreme cases cause sections of the power grid to just shut down.

    Never heard of "blackouts" ??
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_ma...

    Electrical power systems are built to stand overhead cables being struck by lightning, which causes a large overload every time it happens. The majority of the time things just carry on working, occasionally something trips or fuses go.


    A wire (cable) has to be massively overloaded to "blow up", the electrical system in general is built with overload protection, circuit breakers and fuses at every level so cables can never be overloaded if everything is used correctly.

    That's part of laws and regulations - at any point a larger cable "splits out" to smaller cables, each individual cable has to have circuit breakers or fuses so the smaller cable cannot be overloaded.

    It's nothing to do with cables blowing up, it is to prevent even a moderate overload that could overheat any wire or cable to the point it could cause a fire.
    eg. you have a fuse board or "consumer unit" in your house to protect all the cables from that, and rather larger things like these in the distribution system from power stations:
    http://www.electricalpowerenergy.com/201...

    That (fire) is the only real, destructive, hazard. If everything is used properly it should never happen.

    It takes something like someone stupidly overloading a cable, such as by running several electric heaters from the same outlet rather than one per outlet.
    And !!! they have bypassed the fuse that protected the cable to the outlet, because it kept blowing...
    That's just asking for a house fire.
    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DeTv4deVMAAG...


    Data cable work at low voltages and do not carry any power, as such. Most undersea cables are now fibre optic rather than copper, as fibre systems can handle far more data.
    (Submarine means under water).
    4 answers · 3 days ago
  • Give an example where finding the area under the curve is the same as finding the solution for a given equation?

    Best answer: Anything at all in which the result is the sum of a series of some small product. More mathematically known as an "integration". eg if distance = speed * time then total distance = sum ( speed * time) so if speed is not constant and it is plotted on the vertical axis with time on the horizontal axis then... show more
    Best answer: Anything at all in which the result is the sum of a series of some small product.
    More mathematically known as an "integration".

    eg if distance = speed * time then total distance = sum ( speed * time)
    so if speed is not constant and it is plotted on the vertical axis with time on the horizontal axis then the area under the graph is the total distance.

    Impulse = F.t
    so if you plot force on the vertical axis and time on the horizontal axis then the area under the graph is total impulse.

    V = at
    so if you plot acceleration on the vertical axis and time on the horizontal axis then the area under the graph is velocity.

    Work = F.d
    so if you plot force on the vertical axis and distance on the horizontal axis then the area under the graph is work.

    There are countless thousands of other examples. Calculating the moment of inertia for various bodies.
    Calculating the potential of a gravitational field.
    Or an electric or magnetic one for that matter.

    Just so many examples it would take books of them to get across the scope of your question.
    4 answers · 4 days ago
  • Is force required for an object to keep accelerating at a constant rate?

    Best answer: Yes. An object that is in motion will stay in motion without additional force, but it will not accelerate. Constant acceleration requires constant force.
    Best answer: Yes. An object that is in motion will stay in motion without additional force, but it will not accelerate. Constant acceleration requires constant force.
    8 answers · 7 days ago