• What does the word Tithe mean?

    19 answers · 2 days ago
  • What is LITERALLY the opposite or like Reverse of "a needle in a haystack"? Like litteraly.?

    What is LITTERALLY the opposite of "a needle in a haystack"? Like a reverse would be of "a needle in a haystack". An example would be "a needlestack in a _______ ". Or something along those lines, the question is... What would fill up the blank?
    What is LITTERALLY the opposite of "a needle in a haystack"? Like a reverse would be of "a needle in a haystack". An example would be "a needlestack in a _______ ". Or something along those lines, the question is... What would fill up the blank?
    21 answers · 4 days ago
  • What does 'bud' mean in this sentence?

    'What's up bud?'
    'What's up bud?'
    10 answers · 8 hours ago
  • Does the copycat is different to impostor?

    I know the copycat means by doing and impostor means by appearance. Am I right?
    I know the copycat means by doing and impostor means by appearance. Am I right?
    8 answers · 3 days ago
  • Is badonkadonkdonk a real word?

    Best answer: Badonkadonk is a real word, badonkadonkdonk is not.
    Best answer: Badonkadonk is a real word, badonkadonkdonk is not.
    9 answers · 2 days ago
  • What does "get sent" mean according to this sentence?

    Best answer: It means the writer can't use proper English grammar.
    The sentence should be written:
    Pictures are sent to me all the time.
    People send pictures to me all the time.
    I receive pictures all the time.
    I get pictures sent to me all the time.
    Best answer: It means the writer can't use proper English grammar.
    The sentence should be written:
    Pictures are sent to me all the time.
    People send pictures to me all the time.
    I receive pictures all the time.
    I get pictures sent to me all the time.
    8 answers · 16 hours ago
  • "Undocumented immigrant" is wrong???

    Best answer: An Immigrant, per the USCIS, has followed our rules regarding immigration and granted some level of immigrant status. Before that, a person is either a "RESIDENT ALIEN" or "ILLEGAL ALIEN" and the insinuation of some impoliteness is just deceptive. It is NOT rude, mean, impolite to state that a... show more
    Best answer: An Immigrant, per the USCIS, has followed our rules regarding immigration and granted some level of immigrant status.

    Before that, a person is either a "RESIDENT ALIEN" or "ILLEGAL ALIEN" and the insinuation of some impoliteness is just deceptive. It is NOT rude, mean, impolite to state that a person is "SINGLE" or "MARRIED". It's their status.

    If a person is an alien, they are technically an alien. NOT an immigrant per LEGAL language.
    .
    12 answers · 2 days ago
  • Is the sentence correct - "There were a number of civilizations invented paper."?

    Best answer: No. Try: "A number of civilisations (independently) invented paper". But you could use: "There were a number of civilisations which invented paper" Just the addition of that one word makes the sentence "correct", but I still think that most native speakers would use the shorter... show more
    Best answer: No. Try: "A number of civilisations (independently) invented paper".

    But you could use: "There were a number of civilisations which invented paper" Just the addition of that one word makes the sentence "correct", but I still think that most native speakers would use the shorter version quoted by me earlier.
    8 answers · 4 days ago
  • People don't use words like "Temerity" much anymore? why?

    Best answer: In this case I would simply say it was rude.

    Audacious and temerity both imply a degree of courage, even if misplaced. Unless your host is likely to beat you up for your rudeness, there is no need to describe your behaviour as 'temerity'.
    Best answer: In this case I would simply say it was rude.

    Audacious and temerity both imply a degree of courage, even if misplaced. Unless your host is likely to beat you up for your rudeness, there is no need to describe your behaviour as 'temerity'.
    7 answers · 24 hours ago
  • Why are there so many "English Grammar" snobs forever watchful on Y/A, always ready to criticises the slightest flaw in your Grammar.?

    Best answer: The 'Grammar Police' are to easy too troal.
    Best answer: The 'Grammar Police' are to easy too troal.
    17 answers · 4 days ago
  • Does this sentence make sense?

    " Despite finding out her name, her biological parents wished her away with." Especially the "wished her away with" It sounded right in my head but I'm not sure how my English teacher would take it.
    " Despite finding out her name, her biological parents wished her away with." Especially the "wished her away with" It sounded right in my head but I'm not sure how my English teacher would take it.
    7 answers · 18 hours ago
  • Is "i've seen" a grammar mistake or a spelling mistake?

    I'm confused if a grammar mistake is the incorrect placement of words and also the incorrect writing.
    I'm confused if a grammar mistake is the incorrect placement of words and also the incorrect writing.
    7 answers · 18 hours ago
  • Does this English sentence sound strange?

    Most people aged 18 are high school students in Japan. I believe this sentence is grammatically correct, but couldn't find many sentences like this on the Net.
    Most people aged 18 are high school students in Japan. I believe this sentence is grammatically correct, but couldn't find many sentences like this on the Net.
    7 answers · 3 hours ago
  • Why do people use words like "Mendacity"? (where , how this word came into use?) it means "untruthfulness"? or simple "lying"?

    Best answer: mendacity is a particular way of lying, with mendacious meaning that you are a habitual liar, a person of low character who lies whenever you can get away with it. Everyone lies once in a while, often for good reason, but that is not mendacity. White lies are not mendacious, and an occasional lie is not... show more
    Best answer: mendacity is a particular way of lying, with mendacious meaning that you are a habitual liar, a person of low character who lies whenever you can get away with it. Everyone lies once in a while, often for good reason, but that is not mendacity. White lies are not mendacious, and an occasional lie is not mendacity.

    English is a wonderful language in that it has taken words from many different sources, words which mean essentially the same thing as a general idea, but have been employed to provide nuance or more specific aspects of the general idea. A mendacious person is a liar, but not all liars are mendacious people.
    6 answers · 24 hours ago
  • Is "Advanced" a verb or an adjective?

    i found a word "advanced" in Opera mini. is it a verb or adjective?
    i found a word "advanced" in Opera mini. is it a verb or adjective?
    7 answers · 1 day ago
  • How come in Canada they spell “favorite color” as “favourite colour” as in British English?

    Best answer: It's not just Canada that uses traditional English spelling, it's the English-speaking world except the USA. But since that's not what you asked, here's why. It all goes back to that Revolutionary War thing. The folks in the Thirteen Colonies were being taxed all to hell and back by the English... show more
    Best answer: It's not just Canada that uses traditional English spelling, it's the English-speaking world except the USA. But since that's not what you asked, here's why.

    It all goes back to that Revolutionary War thing. The folks in the Thirteen Colonies were being taxed all to hell and back by the English crown, and they wanted to distance themselves from England as much as possible. Just like in conflicts today, the guys behind the revolt against the crown knew the value of psychological warfare. Changing the spelling and / or pronunciation of certain words was a way to insult their enemy.

    The folks in what is now Ontario (Upper Canada at the time) might not have been happy with the English taxes either, but they had a different problem to deal with. That problem was called France, who owned a whole big piece of the land up there and were openly at war with England. The English eventually won control of Canada from the French, after a series of nasty battles, and many French Canadians are still cheesed off about it.
    9 answers · 2 days ago
  • What does it mean when they say somewhere is "based" ?

    For example Afghanistan is based.
    For example Afghanistan is based.
    6 answers · 22 hours ago