• Why can't the position of planets at birth tell me about my personality or future?

    Astronomers- tell me why I can't rely on this. I simply won't believe it, until you set me straight.
    Astronomers- tell me why I can't rely on this. I simply won't believe it, until you set me straight.
    33 answers · 2 days ago
  • Who crate heaven and earth?

    40 answers · 3 days ago
  • Is it true that if aliens existed it would take them light years to get to Earth?

    How long would it take them to travel to Earth? Do you believe that aliens exist?
    How long would it take them to travel to Earth? Do you believe that aliens exist?
    44 answers · 3 days ago
  • Did you know Atheists at first saw the Big Bang Theory as a threat? Why did Atheists oppose the Big Bang Theory?

    The leading philosophers of ancient Greece showed no inkling of the concept of creation ex nihilo (equivalent of Big Bang) in time. For Leucippus (c. 490-430 B.C.) and Democritus (c. 460-360 B.C.), indivisible atoms were eternal in the void and creation of the world simply entailed them becoming packed or... show more
    The leading philosophers of ancient Greece showed no inkling of the concept of creation ex nihilo (equivalent of Big Bang) in time. For Leucippus (c. 490-430 B.C.) and Democritus (c. 460-360 B.C.), indivisible atoms were eternal in the void and creation of the world simply entailed them becoming packed or scattered, thus producing the world of things about us. Flash forward to the seventeenth century and we see a resurgence of philosophical atomism by theists Descartes, Gassendi, Boyle, and others. For centuries, atheistic materialists had assumed the eternity of the material world, a view seemingly harmonious with the “new atomism.” All of this also fit well with twentieth century astronomy’s standard “steady state” theory. The advent of the “Big Bang” theory of cosmic origins in the 30th century by a Belgian priest and astronomer Georges Lemaitre (1894-1966) changed all that. It thus met opposition for proposing a scientific hypothesis that the cosmos actually did have a temporal beginning like Christian theology had taught all along. Among the first to complain was Albert Einstein himself. Science had seemed to be in the atheist’s corner, until this upstart Big Bang theory was proposed – a theory that sounded too much like what atheists viewed as the “Christian mythology” of creation in time. Atheists from all corners of science went on to attack the Big Bang and still many do today. https://strangenotions.com/how-cosmic-ex...
    24 answers · 2 days ago
  • No UFOs, Right?

    If there are no UFOs, then we must admit that thousands of people around the globe that have seen a UFO are lying. So many are lying? Really? Can it be that the government is hiding UFO facts from the public to prevent panic?
    If there are no UFOs, then we must admit that thousands of people around the globe that have seen a UFO are lying. So many are lying? Really? Can it be that the government is hiding UFO facts from the public to prevent panic?
    28 answers · 3 days ago
  • If there are black holes, shouldn’t there also be dim holes?

    Best answer: Any gravitating object has a slight effect on the direction of light rays that pass near it without striking it. That doesn't make it a "dim hole" -- the light still passes by, but ends up on a slightly different trajectory than it would've had otherwise.
    Best answer: Any gravitating object has a slight effect on the direction of light rays that pass near it without striking it. That doesn't make it a "dim hole" -- the light still passes by, but ends up on a slightly different trajectory than it would've had otherwise.
    15 answers · 2 days ago
  • WHY DOES THE MOON GET HIT BY METEORS ETC?

    Best answer: The Earth gets just as many. Correct, it's in the way of just as much as the Moon is. However, there are three reasons why the Earth doesn't have so many obvious craters. (And more, such as plate tectonics, but I'll keep it to three.) 1. The Earth has an atmosphere. Most stuff heats up on the way... show more
    Best answer: The Earth gets just as many. Correct, it's in the way of just as much as the Moon is. However, there are three reasons why the Earth doesn't have so many obvious craters. (And more, such as plate tectonics, but I'll keep it to three.)

    1. The Earth has an atmosphere. Most stuff heats up on the way down as it's travelling fast, and it burns up, so only the really big ones hit the ground.

    2. Erosion takes place on Earth. Wind and water wear craters away eventually, so it's only the most recent ones - like Barringer Crater (also known as Meteor Crater) in Arizona - that are still visible. The Moon has no water and no weather, so this "scrubbing out" doesn't happen and craters get preserved forever.

    3. More than half of the Earth's surface is ocean. There is more chance of a big meteor landing in the ocean than on land. That would certainly cause a tsunami and flood all the coasts around where it landed, but it wouldn't make a crater.

    For example, do you remember the Chelyabinsk meteor in 2013? It came down as lots of people were driving to work and many of them had dashcams (so in case of an accident they have a video to prove what happened for insurance purposes). It flashed across the sky, became blindingly bright as it heated up on its way through the atmosphere, and exploded into smaller bits - that was all caught on cam. What a fantastic opportunity for scientists!

    Now where did the bits land? With all this cam footage from different directions, it was possible to work out where it came down and it turned out most of it landed in a lake miles from the city. So there's really almost nothing left of it to see. Scientists were able to dig up small pieces out of the snow and analyse what kind of meteorite it was, but the biggest bits landed in the lake.

    If that had headed towards the Moon, it would simply have crashed straight into the ground all in one piece and made an obvious crater.
    15 answers · 4 days ago
  • Are aliens real?

    If there is supposed to be 200+ billion planets or something like that there MUST be otherworldly life out there
    If there is supposed to be 200+ billion planets or something like that there MUST be otherworldly life out there
    8 answers · 10 hours ago
  • Do you believe in the existence of Extraterrestrial life on other planets not nessarly UFO and visitors and all that conspire stuff?

    Best answer: The odds that extraterrestrial life exists are astronomically high, because the cosmos is vast; the odds ET visits Earth are astronomically low, for the same reason. . If you want to see this question (or any other common question) asked and answered more times than you'll ever want to read, just use that... show more
    Best answer: The odds that extraterrestrial life exists are astronomically high, because the cosmos is vast; the odds ET visits Earth are astronomically low, for the same reason.
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    If you want to see this question (or any other common question) asked and answered more times than you'll ever want to read, just use that Search Answers tool bar at the top of the webpage. https://answers.search.yahoo.com/search?...
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    8 answers · 17 hours ago
  • Do you know how I can get to the moon?

    17 answers · 4 days ago
  • Do you wish that you could explore the entire Milky Way Galaxy?

    I wish I could that be fun!
    I wish I could that be fun!
    6 answers · 7 hours ago