• Have you ever worked in NASA?

    Best answer: I worked for a prime contractor, Grumman Aircraft, on Apollo
    Best answer: I worked for a prime contractor, Grumman Aircraft, on Apollo
    17 answers · Astronomy & Space · 1 day ago
  • Why did Einstein invent relativity?

    Time was doing just fine before he came along and bent it with his gravity machine and screwed up the whole flow of things. The speed of light wouldn't be relevant to frame of reference either. It would just do what it does best- shine at 186,000 mps, no questions asked. Sometimes scientists just just leave... show more
    Time was doing just fine before he came along and bent it with his gravity machine and screwed up the whole flow of things. The speed of light wouldn't be relevant to frame of reference either. It would just do what it does best- shine at 186,000 mps, no questions asked. Sometimes scientists just just leave well enough alone.
    18 answers · Astronomy & Space · 18 hours ago
  • Why do people think if they get a sex change that they are no longer what they were born as.?

    DNA cannot be changed no matter what you do if you are born a woman it says your a woman YOUR a woman...and same goes if your a dude....DNA cannot be changed so changing your sex is pointless
    DNA cannot be changed no matter what you do if you are born a woman it says your a woman YOUR a woman...and same goes if your a dude....DNA cannot be changed so changing your sex is pointless
    13 answers · Biology · 1 day ago
  • Is there a paranormal phenomenon to surviving a high speed collision head-on with a semi?

    Best answer: If true then yes it would have to be
    Best answer: If true then yes it would have to be
    10 answers · Paranormal Phenomena · 15 hours ago
  • Is this proof the earth is flat: when you fly half way around the world they always take the long way up north?

    to prove that it's round but on a map it shows there is a more direct route.
    to prove that it's round but on a map it shows there is a more direct route.
    9 answers · Geography · 7 hours ago
  • If you’re up to the task, what is 21 out of 42?

    Best answer: '42' divided by '21' eqals '2'
    '42' subtract '21' equals '21'.
    Best answer: '42' divided by '21' eqals '2'
    '42' subtract '21' equals '21'.
    12 answers · Mathematics · 1 day ago
  • If humanity were to send two interstellar craft, one with the spin of the galaxy and the other against the spin would one get there faster?

    So say humanity builds two interstellar craft and there happens to be a star 5 lightyears away on either side of us, one ahead of us the way the galaxy is rotating and one behind us. Would the craft going against the rotation of the galaxy get there faster?
    So say humanity builds two interstellar craft and there happens to be a star 5 lightyears away on either side of us, one ahead of us the way the galaxy is rotating and one behind us. Would the craft going against the rotation of the galaxy get there faster?
    8 answers · Astronomy & Space · 2 days ago
  • America has much more white people than Canada does. True?

    I take that back.....America is 100 percent white, and the statistics of the Canadian population are as follows: 60 percent black, 30 percent Arab, and 10 percent Asian. White Canadians have either been battered to death by the immigrants, or they moved down to the States. And they often enjoy how peaceful and... show more
    I take that back.....America is 100 percent white, and the statistics of the Canadian population are as follows: 60 percent black, 30 percent Arab, and 10 percent Asian. White Canadians have either been battered to death by the immigrants, or they moved down to the States. And they often enjoy how peaceful and white European America is! Civilized white Canada now forever belongs in the history books. Too bad, it was once a wonderful country. :(
    19 answers · Geography · 3 days ago
  • Is it possible to make a nuclear bomb even more powerful than the asteroid that killed the dinosaurs?

    Are we capable of creating a weapon even more powerful than the asteroid the killed the dinosaurs? For those who know. The asteroid's estimated energy is about 10 billion Hiroshima A-bombs about 100,000 EJ. Compared By contrast, the most powerful man-made explosive device ever detonated, the Tsar Bomba, had... show more
    Are we capable of creating a weapon even more powerful than the asteroid the killed the dinosaurs? For those who know. The asteroid's estimated energy is about 10 billion Hiroshima A-bombs about 100,000 EJ. Compared By contrast, the most powerful man-made explosive device ever detonated, the Tsar Bomba, had an energy of only 210 petajoules. But are we able to make a bomb that puts out more power than the asteroid that killed the dinosaurs. It doesn't matter how much money it costs, how long it takes to make it. As long as it's more powerful (no matter now much (slightly or a by a lot).
    13 answers · Other - Science · 2 days ago
  • In my own opinion, NASA is slow, what do you say?

    Best answer: Because movies are FICTION. In fiction, you don't have to think about all the real practical problems. Starting with the money. It's incredibly expensive and Congress would rather spend tax money on something else. This is why the last three Apollo missions to the Moon got cancelled. JFK had announced... show more
    Best answer: Because movies are FICTION.

    In fiction, you don't have to think about all the real practical problems. Starting with the money. It's incredibly expensive and Congress would rather spend tax money on something else. This is why the last three Apollo missions to the Moon got cancelled.

    JFK had announced that "we choose to go to the Moon before the decade is out" so Congress found the money to do it, and also the country was scared that the Soviet Union might manage to do it first. It had already been first to launch something into space, first to launch an astronaut, first to actually get something to the Moon (though all it did was crash) and the first American attempt to launch something resulted in embarrassing failure when the rocket rose about 4 feet off the launch pad, came back down and blew up. That resulted in headlines of "Kaputnik". OUCH! There was a desperate need in the Cold War to find something NASA could do first and give one in the eye to the Russkies!

    So Congress put the money in and it got done, when Apollo 11 landed on the Moon in 1969. JFK's target had been achieved (shame he never lived to see it). But once it was done, why do it any more? Public feeling was that it was costing too much and there's also the Vietnam War to pay for. So Apollo got cancelled. (As we found out after the Soviet Union collapsed - under communism it could hide almost anything that went wrong - the Russians actually were trying for a manned Moonshot, but the huge N-1 rocket never worked so they gave up. It was too complicated and blew up every time they tried to launch it. So NASA would have been first anyway, but it also wanted to meet that target of "before the decade is out".)

    Space probes are much easier and cheaper, they don't need to eat, drink or breathe, they don't get bored, so if what you want to do with your space mission could be done just as well with a robot, of course you're going to do that. Send people for more than a few days and you have endless problems - food, air, water, clothes, exercise, and the psychological problems of being cooped up in a tiny space for ages. All of that for a start means you need a bigger rocket than has ever been built before.

    Space is BIG. It takes most of a year just to get to Mars, and apart from all those other problems, how do you stop cosmic rays and the solar wind giving all the astronauts radiation-induced cancer on the way?

    Of course in movies, you just ignore all the problems. And the normal solution in science fiction to deal with the huge distances is hyperspace - you just say there is this magical way of "jumping" from one place to another in an instant. But as far as anybody knows, hyperspace doesn't exist. Which means we're up against Einstein's theory of special relativity, which shows that it is impossible to travel faster than light - and even getting close to it, your spaceship becomes much heavier so it'll need some incredible fuel source. The next nearest star to the Sun is over 4 years away at light-speed - now how are you even going to get there, never mind anywhere further?

    Bear in mind also that 4 years is going at the cosmic speed limit all the way. You need to accelerate from zero and you can't do that too fast - the human body can't stand up to being accelerated too hard, and astronauts do training to get used to the g-forces they might have on take-off and landing. Accelerate too hard and they'd get squashed. Which brings me to the famous Star Trek joke - to stop everyone on the Enterprise getting turned into mush whenever it goes VOOM somewhere, the ship has "inertial dampers". How do those work? "Very well", said Gene Roddenberry. Of course - again they are the purest fiction.

    And you can't get to the cosmic speed limit - the ship itself would get too heavy. 100 years seems more realistic than 4.

    NASA is NOT slow, it just has the REAL universe to deal with.
    28 answers · Astronomy & Space · 4 days ago
  • When winter comes can I stand on the Sun?

    Best answer: Yes. There is a flight leaving soon, so book your seat now.
    Best answer: Yes. There is a flight leaving soon, so book your seat now.
    9 answers · Astronomy & Space · 10 hours ago
  • What am i seeing in my glass of juice and vodka?

    I just made a vodka apple juice, and while i was pouring the apple juice into the glass i noticed these stringlike things swirling around the glass. Ive seen this before in various liquids and it kind of reminds me of those eyefloater stringy things, i just never found out what it was and google dont know. They... show more
    I just made a vodka apple juice, and while i was pouring the apple juice into the glass i noticed these stringlike things swirling around the glass. Ive seen this before in various liquids and it kind of reminds me of those eyefloater stringy things, i just never found out what it was and google dont know. They pretty much fill the entire glass and are almost invicible and very thin. Could this be some molecular connection, like a really long thick bond that i can see with my eyes? What could it be? Like from a emperical, scientific point of view? Dont mind the spelling mistakes. Too drunk to spell.
    8 answers · Chemistry · 3 days ago