• Why do private planes crash more than airline planes ?

    Best answer: They operate under different rules and regulations. The regulations for airlines are designed to remove as much risk as possible to the flying public. The rules for private planes are not really there to protect the people in the plane from risk - the rules are there to prevent them from endangering other... show more
    Best answer: They operate under different rules and regulations.

    The regulations for airlines are designed to remove as much risk as possible to the flying public. The rules for private planes are not really there to protect the people in the plane from risk - the rules are there to prevent them from endangering other planes or people on the ground. The amount of risk that the pilot is willing to accept is up the pilot (and his insurance company). Airlines are not allowed to take risks

    Two examples of rules that make it legal for private pilots to do dumb/risky things: a private pilot can fly as low as they like as long as they are not near people, structures, or vehicles. Flying over the Chesapeake Bay at 5 feet of altitude is legal- but it's not safe. A private plane can fly under visual rules if there is 3 miles of visibility - but unless you know the area very, very, well, it's almost impossible to navigate visually with that little visibility.
    8 answers · 1 week ago
  • Who owns the airplanes of an airline?

    Best answer: It is really a matter of airline's preference and their financial resources. While some airlines own their aircraft, some prefer to lease them. most airlines follow of hybrid strategy of owning part of the fleet and leasing the other part. Leasing allows the airlines to get modern, fuel efficient aircraft... show more
    Best answer: It is really a matter of airline's preference and their financial resources. While some airlines own their aircraft, some prefer to lease them. most airlines follow of hybrid strategy of owning part of the fleet and leasing the other part.

    Leasing allows the airlines to get modern, fuel efficient aircraft quickly without big capital expense. This is especially attractive to low cost carriers such as easyJet or Spirit because their business strategy depends on flying the most fuel efficient aircraft and getting rid of them before they are due for expensive heavy maintenance. During economic downturns or if their expansion plans do not pan out the airlines can quickly downsize by returning the aircraft to lessors.

    Over the last several decades because of the favorable tax environment Dublin, Ireland became a world-wide aircraft leasing hub. Every major lessor has either its headquarters or a regional offce there. Some leasing companies specialize in leasing large passenger aircraft, some spacialize in regional jets and turboprops, some specialize in used aircraft, and some are leasing freighters.

    Today aircraft lessors control nearly half of world's aircraft order backlog and weld great influence with aircraft manufactures. When Steven Udvar-Hazy, then a chairman of International Lease Finance Corporation, a major aircraft lessor, criticized Airbus' proposed answer to Boeing 787, Airbus scrapped its plans, went back to the drawing board and came up with the A350, a much more credible competitor. Boeing had designed the 787 with the leasing companies in mind from the start. It offers customer a choice between the Rolls-Royce and General Electric engines, but the aircraft has a feature called a Common Engine Interface that allows one manufacturer's engine to be easily swapped for the other. This way a leasing company can offer an engine choice to the customer.

    Some airlines prefer to own their fleets outright. Singapore Airlines owns its aircraft and disposes of them after ten years. In the 1993 it even set up an aircraft leasing arm to lease the airline's excess aircraft to other airlines. It 2007 it sold the leasing operation to Bank of China.

    Some airlines may own some of their aircraft, while leasing others. American Airlines, for example, operated 35 Airbus A300s from 1988 to 2008, the airline owned 26 and leased 9. Air Canada sold several of its Boeing 787s upon taking delivery from the factory and leased them back. The transaction allowed the airline to preserve its capiatal while renewing its long range fleet. it also helped that Air Canada made about $18 million on the deal because of the great demand for the 787 production slots.
    14 answers · 1 week ago
  • Can pilots reduce cabin pressure in a commercial plane to make passengers unconscious?

    Best answer: Yes, the pressurisation can be cut from the cockpit.
    Best answer: Yes, the pressurisation can be cut from the cockpit.
    7 answers · 1 week ago
  • How Airfoils speed up the air and gain a low pressure on top of a wing?

    Hey, I was wondering how the top of an airfoils are speeds up and the pressure is lowered, I researched into this and most sources say that due to the constriction of the airflow along the top, The air is sped up... This would make sense if there was a ceiling on top of the wing constricting the airflow but theres... show more
    Hey, I was wondering how the top of an airfoils are speeds up and the pressure is lowered, I researched into this and most sources say that due to the constriction of the airflow along the top, The air is sped up... This would make sense if there was a ceiling on top of the wing constricting the airflow but theres not its just more air so wouldnt it just warp the higher streamlines up more and not really constrict the flow much, Or is it by nature the air simply gets closer together? Before you say this isn't how planes make lift I know it's not the true reason but I would like to know why this explanation comes to play and how it really works.
    9 answers · 1 week ago
  • Why small planes keep crashing almost daily?

    Best answer: Why is it cars crash daily? Has to do with the numbers being used doesn't it. There are larger numbers of GA aircraft flying than you think.
    Best answer: Why is it cars crash daily? Has to do with the numbers being used doesn't it. There are larger numbers of GA aircraft flying than you think.
    7 answers · 1 week ago
  • What is the name of this aircraft?

    What is the name of this aircraft?

    Best answer: F-22
    Best answer: F-22
    3 answers · 7 days ago
  • Airplane and pressurization?

    Best answer: The pressure inside the airplane is maintained by the engines running (the pressurized air is taken from the engine compressor). Stop the engine, and the pressurization will go away. On top of that, there are pressure relief valves that could depressurize the cabin when activated. And since an aircraft is usually... show more
    Best answer: The pressure inside the airplane is maintained by the engines running (the pressurized air is taken from the engine compressor). Stop the engine, and the pressurization will go away.
    On top of that, there are pressure relief valves that could depressurize the cabin when activated. And since an aircraft is usually pressurized to something like the one existing outside at 5000 to 8000 ft altitude when cruising, when the plane lands, the pressure was already made equal to that of the outside.
    6 answers · 1 week ago
  • What is your favorite Cold War bomber aircraft?

    Best answer: My ears are still ringing from a fleet of B-52s that took off 40 years ago.
    Best answer: My ears are still ringing from a fleet of B-52s that took off 40 years ago.
    6 answers · 1 week ago
  • Do fighter jets fire one or two missiles a time at other aircraft?

    Best answer: They fire 1 at a time.
    Best answer: They fire 1 at a time.
    10 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Did the Red Baron have a customized plane (besides the paintjob I mean)? And how important was the plane itself rather than the pilot?

    Best answer: Manfred von Richthofen used planes as delivered from the factory. The red Fokker TriPlane associated with him was the type he died in, but he only scored 19 of his 80 kills in the Fokker. His first all red plane was an Albatros D.III, Serial No. 789/16. Most of his kills came in Albatros's, both the D.II and... show more
    Best answer: Manfred von Richthofen used planes as delivered from the factory. The red Fokker TriPlane associated with him was the type he died in, but he only scored 19 of his 80 kills in the Fokker. His first all red plane was an Albatros D.III, Serial No. 789/16. Most of his kills came in Albatros's, both the D.II and D.III versions.

    He had a reputation for excellent gunnery skills, but he was not known to be an excellent aerobatic pilot - his stick and rudder skills were average at best. Most of his kills were against inexperienced pilots.

    He developed a set of tactics that he taught to his squadron, including to attack from above with the Sun behind you. - one thing that has been consistent in aerial combat since WWI is that most pilots that get shot down never even see the plane that shoots them down.
    Many of those tactics are still used.
    7 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Will automation replace pilots in the airline industry due to pilot shortage?

    Best answer: No. Not in the foreseeable future. the 2-crew cockpit is here is stay for a long time.
    Best answer: No. Not in the foreseeable future. the 2-crew cockpit is here is stay for a long time.
    8 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Is there going to be a disruptive model in airline industry in the near future 2 or 3 years from.now?

    Best answer: The entire aviation industry is staid, slow moving, extremely safety oriented, and extremely conservative. Except for the paint on the aircraft, it's doubtful that a casual observer will note ANY differences in 3 years.
    Best answer: The entire aviation industry is staid, slow moving, extremely safety oriented, and extremely conservative. Except for the paint on the aircraft, it's doubtful that a casual observer will note ANY differences in 3 years.
    9 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • Why is it illegal to fly a drone around a commercial airline?

    Best answer: A drone that is ingested in to the engine of a commercial aircraft can cause a catastrophic failure of the engine. While a commercial aircraft can fly on one engine, it is particularly vulnerable when it is at take off or landing. The reason it is illegal is because it endangers people's lives.
    Best answer: A drone that is ingested in to the engine of a commercial aircraft can cause a catastrophic failure of the engine. While a commercial aircraft can fly on one engine, it is particularly vulnerable when it is at take off or landing. The reason it is illegal is because it endangers people's lives.
    15 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • Questions about Flight School?

    If one is on a solo flight, what will happen if one does something wrong and is about to crash? How challenging is learning to fly?
    If one is on a solo flight, what will happen if one does something wrong and is about to crash? How challenging is learning to fly?
    10 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • Aircraft maintenance or commercial pilot?

    Best answer: Can you afford a 4 year college degree and an additional $70,000-plus for flight training? If not, you don't really have a choice.
    Best answer: Can you afford a 4 year college degree and an additional $70,000-plus for flight training? If not, you don't really have a choice.
    9 answers · 4 weeks ago