• Am I an idiot?

    Best answer: Not at all. You’ve hopefully learned to frequently check what you’re preparing, regardless of what the instructions (oven temp, bake time, heat level) say. Practice makes perfect. Give it another try.
    Best answer: Not at all. You’ve hopefully learned to frequently check what you’re preparing, regardless of what the instructions (oven temp, bake time, heat level) say. Practice makes perfect. Give it another try.
    40 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • What method of cooking do you prefer to do the most?

    Best answer: I prefer to roast, there is nothing easier that roasting a leg of lamb, even the smell is scrummy.
    Best answer: I prefer to roast, there is nothing easier that roasting a leg of lamb, even the smell is scrummy.
    25 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Jam or butter?

    47 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • What to do when recipe is high heat but pan keeps over boiling?

    Best answer: Then don't follow the instructions! Lower the heat so the pan boils but doesn't boil over. Whoever wrote the instructions can't possibly know what YOUR stove is like, so use some common sense. Just follow "boil for X amount of time" and IGNORE the rest. Put it on whatever heat it needs to... show more
    Best answer: Then don't follow the instructions! Lower the heat so the pan boils but doesn't boil over. Whoever wrote the instructions can't possibly know what YOUR stove is like, so use some common sense. Just follow "boil for X amount of time" and IGNORE the rest. Put it on whatever heat it needs to achieve that.

    You may want to put it on the highest heat to get to the boil quickly, but after that turn it down to what it needs to keep it boiling. That almost certainly WILL be lower - the pan is hot now, so you need less heat to keep it boiling hot. Just enough to replace the heat it's losing from being in a kitchen that is cooler than boiling. How much lower can depend on the size of the pan, the size of the ring, how much water is in the pan - all of those have an effect on how much heat you need to keep it boiling.

    You just have to get to know your own stove. With mine, for example, 6 is the highest setting so I need that to get the water boiling, but once it's boiling, for cooking some vegetables in it I can turn it down to 4 or even 3. That'll keep it bubbling away. For pasta, I use a bigger pan with a lot more water on a bigger ring so the pasta has room to move around and not stick together, so to keep it on a good boil I need to turn it down only to 5. You really need to work this out for yourself. See what works for YOU with YOUR stove and remember that.

    Then there is a recipe I like which calls for simmering with the lid on for 30 minutes - putting the lid on keeps heat in so I find I need to turn it all the way down to 1 when I make that. It's still gently bubbling away inside and that's a simmer - so 1 is all it needs. But that's for one person, so if I make it for two and there's double the amount of food in the pan, I MIGHT need to turn it up to 2. I don't know - I haven't tried that yet!

    If water is boiling, putting up the heat any higher won't make it any hotter. Once water gets to 100C or 212F, that's the temperature it will stay. Apply even more heat and it just turns to steam. So you don't need to cook for longer. As long as the water is boiling, it will take the same time.
    22 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Simple Tomato Sauce and white rice recipe?

    Best answer: Put a cup of raw white rice and 2 cups of water in a pot, when it starts to boil, cover the pot and simmer on low for 20 minutes. Add a small can of tomato sauce to it, and season it with salt and pepper, onion and/or garlic powder if you like.
    Best answer: Put a cup of raw white rice and 2 cups of water in a pot, when it starts to boil, cover the pot and simmer on low for 20 minutes. Add a small can of tomato sauce to it, and season it with salt and pepper, onion and/or garlic powder if you like.
    8 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • What is the hardest thing to cook?

    45 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Cooking: When you follow a recipe correctly, and the food tastes 'blah', what is a good remedy?

    Best answer: Nope. There are waaaaaaaaayyyy too many recipes and different kinds of cooking to have a one fits all magic bullet. I once had a ...rather thick... book called “Let’s Cook It Right” that talked about what to be particularly careful of with various recipes and then also how to “fix” particular types of fails with... show more
    Best answer: Nope. There are waaaaaaaaayyyy too many recipes and different kinds of cooking to have a one fits all magic bullet.

    I once had a ...rather thick... book called “Let’s Cook It Right” that talked about what to be particularly careful of with various recipes and then also how to “fix” particular types of fails with that type of recipe ... but I only ever read through it, never actually used it and eventually gave it away.

    Your best way to make sure that recipes you follow come out as tasty as you expect is to use recipes from known sources that have been tested. Some chefs whose recipes will ALWAYS work right are Julia Childs, Ina Garten, Caprial Pence (ok, her black and white chocolate chip cookie recipe has something wrong with it - but it’s probably a typo). James Peterson. There are lots more but those are MY go tos.

    I also find a wealth of recipes on the internet. When I am pulling recipes off the internet I look at the comments and the stars. If a bunch of people have tried it and report good results, then it’s been tested enough for me.

    Some recipes are not tested. I won’t just try any old recipe, it’s a waste of time and ingredients and my energy. Sometimes if I want to make something specific, like say a Chili Colorado, I may look at a bunch of different recipes then cobble together my own. When I do this I always write down everything I do, make notes later on the results and in my notes suggestions on how to make it better. Then the next time I make that dish I follow my original notes plus the suggestions. Then that sheet get stapled over the last one...so I literally have a stack of stapled papers that detail the history of the development of a recipe and how I tested it. That’s how I developed my own recipes for both red and green enchilada sauces, beef stew with cinnamon and parsnips, my super secret cookie recipe...many more.

    That being said, I’m a good, experienced cook and for many things don’t use a recipe at all because I have enough cooking savy and experience to “wing it”.

    In baking tho, ALWAYS follow the recipe EXACTLY if you want the results the recipe promises. I will always try a baking recipe once before making any modifications so I can be sure I know the base I am riffing on.
    25 answers · 1 week ago
  • What is this yellow stuff on the pie?

    What is this yellow stuff on the pie?

    Best answer: Looks like custard to me. The Brits LOVE their custard with everything.

    And yes, over there it can be thick and creamy or runny and thin. They pour it over a lot of desserts.
    Best answer: Looks like custard to me. The Brits LOVE their custard with everything.

    And yes, over there it can be thick and creamy or runny and thin. They pour it over a lot of desserts.
    20 answers · 1 week ago
  • Has anyone ever had their instant pot cooker explode on them?

    Best answer: This will happen if you rush releasing the pressure in the cooker. Make sure all the pressure is released by giving it a couple more minutes. Terrible burns and scalds have been known to occur by pots being opened too soon, and it's often the face that gets it.
    Best answer: This will happen if you rush releasing the pressure in the cooker. Make sure all the pressure is released by giving it a couple more minutes. Terrible burns and scalds have been known to occur by pots being opened too soon, and it's often the face that gets it.
    9 answers · 1 week ago
  • Mold on a tortilla- can I just tear it off and eat the rest?

    I have one tortilla left for the wrap I'm making but there is a spot of mold on it, the size of a penny. Is it safe to get rid of that bit and eat the rest?
    I have one tortilla left for the wrap I'm making but there is a spot of mold on it, the size of a penny. Is it safe to get rid of that bit and eat the rest?
    21 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Where did scones originate?

    15 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Is there a substitute for Styrofoam cup?

    17 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • When a large bag of chips goes stale overnight, is there a way to make them crispy again?

    Best answer: Never done it but I would put them in a brown paper bag with the top partly open. Then check on them at 200 degrees. This should also drive off the staleness.
    Best answer: Never done it but I would put them in a brown paper bag with the top partly open. Then check on them at 200 degrees. This should also drive off the staleness.
    11 answers · 2 weeks ago