• Did science get evolution wrong?

    19 answers · 2 hours ago
  • Why do people believe in evolution?

    22 answers · 2 days ago
  • Can human beings change their genes?

    For example, one race is changed to another race by changing the genes. Are there such ability and technology for human beings? It seems that there is something called “genetic engineering”.
    For example, one race is changed to another race by changing the genes. Are there such ability and technology for human beings? It seems that there is something called “genetic engineering”.
    8 answers · 19 hours ago
  • Has eugenics ever really been disproven?

    We breed for faster and stronger animals. Things such as intelligence are part genetic, part environmental. Either way, by preventing the least talented from reproducing and/or raising children, society would, theoretically improve, right?
    We breed for faster and stronger animals. Things such as intelligence are part genetic, part environmental. Either way, by preventing the least talented from reproducing and/or raising children, society would, theoretically improve, right?
    8 answers · 16 hours ago
  • Can a Gorilla learn boxing?

    Best answer: Can a Gorilla learn boxing? The short answer is... NO Gorillas are very different than humans in their skeletal structure, and therefore have dissimilar body mechanics. Humans have proportionately long legs, and a mostly erect "S" shaped spine, where as Gorillas have proportionately short legs, feet... show more
    Best answer: Can a Gorilla learn boxing?

    The short answer is... NO

    Gorillas are very different than humans in their skeletal structure, and therefore have dissimilar body mechanics. Humans have proportionately long legs, and a mostly erect "S" shaped spine, where as Gorillas have proportionately short legs, feet that are more like hands, and a very hunched-over "C" shaped spine. A proper stance and footwork are the most important and fundamental components of boxing, and this would be impossible for a Gorilla. They could never be able to stand-up right without being extremely off balance, they could never achieve the right stance or move their feet the right way for throwing proper punches, and they could never move their upper or lower body like a boxer does.

    Gorillas are naturally inclined to fight in a way that supports their body's design. They don't exactly have a "natural punching" style, what they generally do in a fight is raise their very long and powerful arms up high above their heads... and with incredible power they POWER SLAM them in a downward motion with enough power to snap a Lion's spine! They also swoop their arms across their bodies in a sideways/horizontal motion at an attacker, but the striking power of this attack is not the real objective (although it will do serious damage), the main goal is to grab the other animal, and pin it down with one arm, so that the gorilla can raise his free arm up high, and power-slam it downward onto the pinned animal, likely killing it in one or two downward forearm/hammer-fist strikes. Gorillas also have incredibly formidable fangs, and can do very severe damage with their bites, and they DO bite in fights! In very close quarters, Gorillas can also use their incredible strength to literally tear animals apart with their hands, like humans rip cardboard! There was a case where gorilla researchers discovered a mangled body of a leopard near a gorilla band, and its lower jaw bone had been completely ripped OFF, its spine snapped, and its skull crushed, and torn in pieces! They observed very mild injuries to the male silver-back leader, that were clearly done by the leopard.

    Gorillas don't need boxing... and even if they did... they couldn't use it!

    Its NOT an intelligence thing... Gorillas are intelligent enough to learn sign language, so my guess is that they are probably intelligent enough to learn boxing basics, but... they're NOT designed for it physically.


    The power in boxing's punches come from the legs, the movement of the (human style) feet, and hip torque, these are things a gorilla could never do! If a gorilla were to throw jabs and crosses the sheer length and weight of their long arms would throw them off balance, and they would fall over on all fours. Given their strength... if they threw hooks it would spin them around, and again they would land on all-fours. They also could never move their feet like a boxer, stand upright with enough balance to execute dynamic boxing movements, and most importantly...

    A GORILLA CANNOT MAKE A PROPER FIST!!!

    A gorilla's hands are very different from a human's The gorilla, like other apes have very long fingers to grasp thick tree branches. The human is the ONLY primate that is able to make a proper fist!. A gorilla's fingers are too long to curl up into a proper fist, and given the physical strength of a gorilla... if they were to throw a boxing style punch, they would break their hands on whatever they hit!!! This is why when they use downward arm strikes the point of contact is generally the forearm, not the somewhat closed fist.

    So... yeah, unfortunately Gorillas CANNOT learn to box given their morphological design...

    However... IF BIG FOOT IS REAL... and, he matches the popular descriptions... HE ACTUALLY MIGHT BE ABLE TO LEARN TO BOX!!!

    The reason is because BIGFOOT supposedly stands upright, and has a more human-like spine and foot shape! I don't know it they would be able to make a closed fist like a human, or if it would be shaped more like a gorillas. So... I hope that helps!!!
    4 answers · 4 days ago
  • Can your baby get pregnant if you have sex while pregnant with said baby in your womb?

    Like can the cumm enter the baby's developing vagina and also get them pregnant? Cause if so then I might be in big trouble.
    Like can the cumm enter the baby's developing vagina and also get them pregnant? Cause if so then I might be in big trouble.
    5 answers · 59 mins ago
  • Is selective breeding one way a species can evolve?

    Best answer: Yes.
    It's not "natural selection" but it's one kind of evolution.
    It can even lead to speciations sometimes.
    Best answer: Yes.
    It's not "natural selection" but it's one kind of evolution.
    It can even lead to speciations sometimes.
    10 answers · 3 days ago
  • How can I evolve into a cheetah?

    Best answer: You can't. But if you keep trying and your kids keep trying, your 25,000th generation might be.
    Best answer: You can't. But if you keep trying and your kids keep trying, your 25,000th generation might be.
    7 answers · 2 days ago
  • How long does it take for suffocation to cause brain death?

    So let’s say someone stops breathing. There are NO interventions, for example, NO CPR. How long would it take for brain death to occur?
    So let’s say someone stops breathing. There are NO interventions, for example, NO CPR. How long would it take for brain death to occur?
    6 answers · 1 day ago
  • From your perspective, which one of the four possibilities after death I proposed has the greatest likelihood and correctness?

    After the death of people in various ways and suicide, does the death of people means non-existence forever, disappearring or being in an unknown realm such as heaven or hell? I think there may be these four possibilities after death, the first one: after death, the soul may be in another unknown realm or space.... show more
    After the death of people in various ways and suicide, does the death of people means non-existence forever, disappearring or being in an unknown realm such as heaven or hell? I think there may be these four possibilities after death, the first one: after death, the soul may be in another unknown realm or space. The second kind: the soul may exist in another form after death. The third kind: the existence of life may become reincarnation of other creatures after death. The fourth kind: Perhaps all the imagination and statements about death in reality are false, and after death the soul may not exist forever.
    6 answers · 1 day ago
  • Is there an alternative scientific theory/hypothesis to evolutionary theory, for how the many species of plants and animals came to exist?

    I mean that is NOT based on religious/theistic accounts, but an actual scientific hypothesis/theory which has the potential to be falsifiable..
    I mean that is NOT based on religious/theistic accounts, but an actual scientific hypothesis/theory which has the potential to be falsifiable..
    14 answers · 6 days ago
  • Moving of co2 form the cells?

    5 answers · 7 hours ago
  • Why do humans kill each other?

    Best answer: I feel like it's an evolutionary thing. Waaay back in the day, humans had to constantly fight and kill predators to survive as well as hunt and kill prey so they could eat. As time went on and we evolved and progressed to the point we're at now, the need to fight and hunt for survival is gone. But I think... show more
    Best answer: I feel like it's an evolutionary thing. Waaay back in the day, humans had to constantly fight and kill predators to survive as well as hunt and kill prey so they could eat. As time went on and we evolved and progressed to the point we're at now, the need to fight and hunt for survival is gone. But I think that primal urge/instinct is still ingrained in us, and might be the reason we do things like boxing and UFC, fist fights, or things like lots of exercise or playing videogames, anything to get that rush of adrenaline or release of anger and stress.

    I think people that kill can't find their outlet, and so that urge/instinct hits a tipping point to where they explode and the end result is murder.

    If you're looking for more surface reasons:
    Anger
    Hate
    Money (hired or life insurance)
    To get out of marriage
    To hide an affair
    Gang initiation
    Drunk (usually with anger)
    High (altered state of mind)
    A lack of care/concern for others lives
    Ego
    Power
    Government (Army)
    Control
    Etc, etc.
    34 answers · 1 week ago
  • Evolutionarily, why do we (most humans) find lizards scary (or, gross), when they can't really hurt us?

    Like, isn't that useless, to be scared or find lizards disgusting, if they can't really hurt us? Plus, they eat other insects that could hurt us..so they actually benefit us Don't say "I'm not scared of them"/"I don't find them gross". You *do* know that most others do...so... show more
    Like, isn't that useless, to be scared or find lizards disgusting, if they can't really hurt us? Plus, they eat other insects that could hurt us..so they actually benefit us Don't say "I'm not scared of them"/"I don't find them gross". You *do* know that most others do...so what's the reason, evolutionarily?
    12 answers · 5 days ago
  • Where do you think we go when we die?

    How I see it is why would we be dead forever? It’s hard to explain how I think. So think about this: why would we be DEAD FOREVER? I believe life is a cycle although the scientific part of being deceased says you loose your memory, etc I believe that. I believe that when we die we’re born again into another HUMAN... show more
    How I see it is why would we be dead forever? It’s hard to explain how I think. So think about this: why would we be DEAD FOREVER? I believe life is a cycle although the scientific part of being deceased says you loose your memory, etc I believe that. I believe that when we die we’re born again into another HUMAN not animal not any of that. However, how would this be true if the human population increased over years?
    15 answers · 6 days ago
  • How do animals see in the dark?

    Best answer: Animals that can see in the dark are known as nocturnal animals, and many of these animals are desert dwellers that evolved into nocturnal animals to avoid the extreme heat of the desert in the daytime.For one, they have big eyes. Nocturnal hunters like owls and cats have pupils that, when open wide, cover the... show more
    Best answer: Animals that can see in the dark are known as nocturnal animals, and many of these animals are desert dwellers that evolved into nocturnal animals to avoid the extreme heat of the desert in the daytime.For one, they have big eyes. Nocturnal hunters like owls and cats have pupils that, when open wide, cover the entire front of the eye. So do tree frogs, which have to be able to jump from branch to branch. In owls, eye size approaches the extreme: their eyes occupy over half the volume of their skulls.

    There are also physiological differences between the eyes of nocturnal and diurnal animals. Owls’ eyes are tubular, rather than spherical, with a very large lens positioned close to the retina. This structure allows a lot of light to register on the retina, but at the expense of flexible focusing. Owls are thought to be somewhat far-sighted. Tubular eyes cannot rotate in their sockets like the spherical eyes you and I have, so owls compensate with incredibly flexible necks that allow them to turn their heads 270 degrees.

    Many nocturnal animals have a mirror-like layer, called the tapetum, behind the retina, which helps them make the most of small amounts of light. Light that passes through the retina is reflected off the tapetum, giving the retinal cells a second chance to sense it. This makes some animals’ eyes shine in the glare of car headlights. The color you see is the pigment on the inner layer of the retina.

    At the heart of all vision is the retina, which contains two types of light-sensing cells: rods and cones. Cones account for color vision but require bright, focused light, whereas rods can sense very dim, scattered light, but don’t produce a color image
    9 answers · 5 days ago