• What is the difference between pie and cake?

    Best answer: A pie has a crust but a cake doesn't.
    A pie has a filling of some sort, but a cake doesn't.
    Best answer: A pie has a crust but a cake doesn't.
    A pie has a filling of some sort, but a cake doesn't.
    4 answers · 2 days ago
  • Somebody at school today said 'asking if im a racist is like asking if the pope is a catholic'. I'm confused what that means?

    Best answer: It's obviously true that the Pope is a Catholic (so that expression is often used to say that something is obviously true).
    Best answer: It's obviously true that the Pope is a Catholic (so that expression is often used to say that something is obviously true).
    3 answers · 17 hours ago
  • What does "Count me in" mean?

    Best answer: It means I will join, or I would like to be included.
    Best answer: It means I will join, or I would like to be included.
    5 answers · 17 hours ago
  • Does "warm milk" mean "hot milk" ?

    28 answers · 1 week ago
  • What is the meaning of "otherwise" in this context?

    Twain wore a white suit and a mustache, took his comedy act on the road, and otherwise made himself so conspicuous as to be widely thought of in his own time as a mere entertainer. This context is a little unclear to me. Dose "otherwise" in this context mean: in different way Thanks in advance.
    Twain wore a white suit and a mustache, took his comedy act on the road, and otherwise made himself so conspicuous as to be widely thought of in his own time as a mere entertainer. This context is a little unclear to me. Dose "otherwise" in this context mean: in different way Thanks in advance.
    5 answers · 22 hours ago
  • What's the difference between GOOD LOOKING, BEAUTIFUL, PRETTY, and CUTE to describe a woman's physical appearance?

    Best answer: I suppose it comes down to personal preference. I would use the first three with an older woman beyond a certain age (and your perspective on that changes with age), but I would not use 'cute'.
    Best answer: I suppose it comes down to personal preference. I would use the first three with an older woman beyond a certain age (and your perspective on that changes with age), but I would not use 'cute'.
    7 answers · 3 days ago
  • Please help .. What is meant by 'over a year' here? Is it more than a year?

    Context: For over a year, Szturmann hid and shared her food rations with the elderly woman.
    Context: For over a year, Szturmann hid and shared her food rations with the elderly woman.
    7 answers · 4 days ago
  • Is HAVE WENT commonly used in spoken American English?

    Best answer: Have went is not grammatically correct.
    Went is only used without the helper verb.
    So you could say, "We went", but not "We have went"

    Most people would say:
    Have you ever gone to the hospital because you...…
    or
    Did you ever go to the hospital because you...….
    Best answer: Have went is not grammatically correct.
    Went is only used without the helper verb.
    So you could say, "We went", but not "We have went"

    Most people would say:
    Have you ever gone to the hospital because you...…
    or
    Did you ever go to the hospital because you...….
    11 answers · 6 days ago
  • Why do the news readers say "an horrific" instead of "a horrific"?

    Best answer: Because they are ignorant. The letter "h" at the beginning of a word is a consonant and takes the indefinite article "a" before it, not "an". The initial "h" is not pronounced in French words and some French words kept their French pronunciation when they arrived in English.... show more
    Best answer: Because they are ignorant. The letter "h" at the beginning of a word is a consonant and takes the indefinite article "a" before it, not "an". The initial "h" is not pronounced in French words and some French words kept their French pronunciation when they arrived in English. The classic was "hotel" which the French pronounce 'otel. If that pronunciation is used in English then "an 'otel" is acceptable but always "a hotel" if you sound the "h".

    This extended to a few other words of French origin so we see "an 'istoric occasion". The problem is that people now sound the "h" but continue to use "an" and it sounds ridiculous. Not only that, I have seen it extended to words that were never French in the first place such as "an hysterectomy" and lots of other words with an initial "h".

    English has adopted the French words and they are English words now. The simple rules are:
    Rule 1. If you sound the initial "h" of a word, always use "a" never "an"
    Rule 2. You are speaking English not French so always sound the initial "h" except in the very few words such as "hour" where it is not sounded.

    Added: From Fowler's Modern English Usage 2nd edition

    "A" is used before all consonants except silent "h" (a history, an hour); "an" was formerly usual before an unaccented syllable and is still often seen and heard (an historian, an hotel, an hysterical scene, an hereditary title, an habitual offender). But now that the "h" in such words is pronounced the distinction has become anomalous and will no doubt disappear in time. Meanwhile speakers who like to say "an" should not try to have it both ways by aspirating the "h".
    12 answers · 6 days ago
  • Should there always be a comma after 'which' in a sentence?

    For example: The table, which my grandmother gave me, is very heavy. Is this right? Should you ALWAYS use a comma before 'which'?
    For example: The table, which my grandmother gave me, is very heavy. Is this right? Should you ALWAYS use a comma before 'which'?
    8 answers · 5 days ago
  • What is the name of this ring called?

    Okay so a couple of weeks ago, i heard that some people wear this certain type of ring that means that if you were to get injured in an accident or unconscious or something and the ambulance shows up, then they won't save your life or something. The ring means that u perfer to die if some thing like that... show more
    Okay so a couple of weeks ago, i heard that some people wear this certain type of ring that means that if you were to get injured in an accident or unconscious or something and the ambulance shows up, then they won't save your life or something. The ring means that u perfer to die if some thing like that happens. Do you guys know what's it called?
    6 answers · 4 days ago
  • Helped me a lot! - What's the subject of sentence?

    Best answer: That's not a sentence - it's part of a sentence.
    The subject has been omitted, although it would be understood to mean 'It/he/she/that helped me a lot,' so the omitted word would be the subject.
    Best answer: That's not a sentence - it's part of a sentence.
    The subject has been omitted, although it would be understood to mean 'It/he/she/that helped me a lot,' so the omitted word would be the subject.
    5 answers · 3 days ago
  • Is his a threat: yes or no? And why?

    “Life is short..let’s make it shorter” Is that a threat and can you explain?
    “Life is short..let’s make it shorter” Is that a threat and can you explain?
    9 answers · 5 days ago
  • How to we use " in effect" in a sentence?

    I have googled it but could not wrap my head around what is written.
    I have googled it but could not wrap my head around what is written.
    4 answers · 2 days ago
  • How do you spell decrepid?

    5 answers · 4 days ago
  • Why have Millennials come up with so many new slang names for things and concepts that already had names?

    Best answer: The only thing original is the words, but not the invention of words. Millennials are kind of messed up because we raised them that way. Our fault, not theirs. We failed them.
    Best answer: The only thing original is the words, but not the invention of words. Millennials are kind of messed up because we raised them that way. Our fault, not theirs. We failed them.
    4 answers · 3 days ago