• If suicide is an unforgivable sin, why is Samson's death held up as redemptive?

    I've seen people here arguing that suicide is an unforgivable sin. So, I'm wondering how they rationalize this with the Biblical story of Samson. In it, Philistine leaders assemble in a temple. Samson is led into the temple, and he asks his captors to let him lean against the supporting pillars to rest. He prays for strength and God gives... show more
    I've seen people here arguing that suicide is an unforgivable sin. So, I'm wondering how they rationalize this with the Biblical story of Samson. In it, Philistine leaders assemble in a temple. Samson is led into the temple, and he asks his captors to let him lean against the supporting pillars to rest. He prays for strength and God gives him strength to break the pillars, causing the temple to collapse, killing him and the people inside. It is easy Samson as a cautionary tale, what with his arson of local wildlife, trusting his wives, and murdering people to settle a bar bet over some honey. But, as the promotion for the new movie put it, "God offered grace, redemption, and a fresh chance to fulfill his purpose." So, why is his final act of murder/suicide held up as a redemptive return to God? Why would God grant Samson the strength to complete an act that God did not want done?
    22 answers · Religion & Spirituality · 4 days ago
  • Why wouldn't God act even if the action will impinge upon the free will of humans?

    I've seen many theists this week claiming that God did nothing about the shooting this week in Florida as to not encroach upon free will. But, this explanation doesn't make a lot of sense to me from a biblical standpoint. I can think of no point in the bible where free will stands as a force that binds God's hands. In fact, there are... show more
    I've seen many theists this week claiming that God did nothing about the shooting this week in Florida as to not encroach upon free will. But, this explanation doesn't make a lot of sense to me from a biblical standpoint. I can think of no point in the bible where free will stands as a force that binds God's hands. In fact, there are many instances that run contrary to that notion. For example, Genesis 19 describes how Lot's wife was turned to a pillar of salt after she looked back at Sodom. If God can turn someone to salt after disobeying a command not to look at a city, what would prevent Him from turning someone to salt after disobeying a command like, "Thou shalt not kill?"
    Religion & Spirituality · 1 week ago
  • Did the biblical hero Samson inspire the name for the Firefox web browser?

    Shortly after an argument about a bet where Samson's new bride had revealed the secret to his riddle (that he had harvested honey from the carcass of a rotting lion), Samson returns to his father-in-law, only to find his father-in-law had given his new wife to one of the other wedding guests. The father-in-law has a magnanimous offer of a... show more
    Shortly after an argument about a bet where Samson's new bride had revealed the secret to his riddle (that he had harvested honey from the carcass of a rotting lion), Samson returns to his father-in-law, only to find his father-in-law had given his new wife to one of the other wedding guests. The father-in-law has a magnanimous offer of a replacement daughter, but Sampson seeks revenge. Judges 15:1 (NIV) Later on, at the time of wheat harvest, Samson took a young goat and went to visit his wife. He said, “I’m going to my wife’s room.” But her father would not let him go in. 2 “I was so sure you hated her,” he said, “that I gave her to your companion. Isn’t her younger sister more attractive? Take her instead.” 3 Samson said to them, “This time I have a right to get even with the Philistines; I will really harm them.” 4 So he went out and caught three hundred foxes and tied them tail to tail in pairs. He then fastened a torch to every pair of tails, 5 lit the torches and let the foxes loose in the standing grain of the Philistines. He burned up the shocks and standing grain, together with the vineyards and olive groves. So, is this story where the term Firefox came from?
    7 answers · Religion & Spirituality · 2 weeks ago
  • Did Frank Herbert borrow from elements of Voodoo for Dune?

    With books like Dune Messiah, the references to Christianity are clear. But, I'm wondering if other religious traditions shaped other elements of the story. For instance, Voodoo has Baron Samedi as leader of the Gede loa, a category of spirits of the dead. In Dune, we have Baron Harkonnen as the leader from Giedi Prime. House Harkonnen would... show more
    With books like Dune Messiah, the references to Christianity are clear. But, I'm wondering if other religious traditions shaped other elements of the story. For instance, Voodoo has Baron Samedi as leader of the Gede loa, a category of spirits of the dead. In Dune, we have Baron Harkonnen as the leader from Giedi Prime. House Harkonnen would be the house most associated with death.
    1 answer · Books & Authors · 3 months ago
  • If Jesus is fully man and fully God, why is Jesus not omniscient?

    I've seen it claimed many times that Jesus is fully man and fully God. However, in Matthew 24:36 and Mark 13:32, Jesus declares emphatically that only the Father knows the final day and hour. This rules out everyone else, including Himself, and necessarily means that no one but the Father is omniscient. If the properties of being God... show more
    I've seen it claimed many times that Jesus is fully man and fully God. However, in Matthew 24:36 and Mark 13:32, Jesus declares emphatically that only the Father knows the final day and hour. This rules out everyone else, including Himself, and necessarily means that no one but the Father is omniscient. If the properties of being God include being omniscient, how could Jesus be fully God without being fully omniscient? Matthew 24:36 But about that day or hour no one knows, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father.
    26 answers · Religion & Spirituality · 4 months ago
  • How do old earth creationists rationalize the concept of the Sabbath?

    A lot of modern Christians say the story of Genesis is not literal, that there were not six actual days of creation with a day of rest. Some argue it should be read as ages of perhaps thousands or millions of years. Aside from the obvious problems like that such as the 'age' of plants preceding the 'age' of the sun and stars and... show more
    A lot of modern Christians say the story of Genesis is not literal, that there were not six actual days of creation with a day of rest. Some argue it should be read as ages of perhaps thousands or millions of years. Aside from the obvious problems like that such as the 'age' of plants preceding the 'age' of the sun and stars and these ages having "evening and morning," how do they rationalize the concept of the Sabbath? There are versus such as the following: Exodus 20:11 For in six days the LORD made the heavens and the earth, the sea, and all that is in them, but he rested on the seventh day. Therefore the LORD blessed the Sabbath day and made it holy. If you don't believe in a literal Genesis but do follow the Sabbath, why do you venerate a process that never actually happened by mirroring it?
    9 answers · Religion & Spirituality · 4 months ago
  • How would you describe the taste of chicken?

    You've probably heard the cliché, "It tastes like chicken," used when describing a new or unfamiliar food. But, what does chicken taste like? How would you describe the flavor? If at all possible, please stay away from the comparisons like, "It tastes like turkey, or alligator." And saying chicken tastes like chicken... show more
    You've probably heard the cliché, "It tastes like chicken," used when describing a new or unfamiliar food. But, what does chicken taste like? How would you describe the flavor? If at all possible, please stay away from the comparisons like, "It tastes like turkey, or alligator." And saying chicken tastes like chicken doesn't help to describe it either.
    6 answers · Other - Food & Drink · 7 months ago
  • Is there a term for this concept in economics?

    Is there a term in economics for the practice of creating a good that requires further purchases of other goods produced by the same company? A few examples would be buying a printer, and then having to buy proprietary ink cartridges made by the company, or Keurig implementing systems into their coffee makers where you have to buy only their... show more
    Is there a term in economics for the practice of creating a good that requires further purchases of other goods produced by the same company? A few examples would be buying a printer, and then having to buy proprietary ink cartridges made by the company, or Keurig implementing systems into their coffee makers where you have to buy only their sanctioned coffee pods?
    3 answers · Economics · 2 years ago